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Forum topic by Gixxerjoe04 posted 10-29-2015 01:14 AM 820 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1036 days


10-29-2015 01:14 AM

I always here people say when buying lumber, you should let it acclimate to your shop for a couple weeks, month, varying answers. Also here of people bringing wood into their house if they have a garage shop like a lot of guys do. So what are your alls standards when it comes to this topic? I don’t see any point in letting acclimate to my particular shop, my shop is my garage that isn’t insulated, the mills I buy my kd wood are basically in big garages and in my state, so don’t think there would be much difference in environment. The other guys who say they put their wood in their house before a project, I just don’t see that very feasible, my wife is really nice but I already bring enough dust in the house, if I started bringing in rough lumber I might be looking for a new place to live haha. So what’s everyone’s rule of wood thumb before starting a project. Also do you joint and plane, then let it sit for a week or so and do it again to bring to final thickness(just another random question that is in the same ball park I thought). Main reason I ask is because I’m going to start on a table in the near future and don’t want to make it and bring it in and it warp or something.


17 replies so far

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fuigb

403 posts in 2417 days


#1 posted 10-29-2015 01:32 AM

Other than sheet goods I let everything sit for a week or two or more before doing a thing. This goes for the good stuff from the mill and the cheap dimenaional crap from the big box. I’m in a garage too, nonetheless I’ve experienced a lot less warping and checking by letting nature have her way. And no, I don’t do a dang thing -I.e. plane or joint- until my cooling off period has passed. Rushing things usually has resulted in disappointment.

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

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TheFridge

5764 posts in 946 days


#2 posted 10-29-2015 01:39 AM

Talked to a fellow recently, who talked of build a hundred tables or so, and he told me to at least surface the faces and sticker for a week or 2. I’m kinda in the same boat as you since I’ve never built a panel bigger than 2’x2’ and don’t want to screw up the tables I’m going to build.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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bearkatwood

1194 posts in 471 days


#3 posted 10-29-2015 01:41 AM

I buy my lumber kiln dried from a retailer nearby, and I have learned the hard way to leave it alone for AT LEAST a week. As soon as the wood leaves the kiln it begins to take moisture back into it and if it happens at an accelerated rate it can build up stresses in the lumber. It might have been kiln dried three months to a year ago and retailers don’t worry about what moister content the wood is at when they sell it; it’s kiln dried that’s good enough. In a perfect world I would put it in a curing room in the heart of the shop, (hoping to get there someday) that is set at a constant temperature and humidity until it has stabilized. Then I pull out the lumber to be used and draw out my patterns a bit over-sized and rough cut them out. This gives the stresses in the wood that are still held up a chance to relax and get to know their new shape. Then cut to the finished pattern shape and plane and mill as needed. I live in a climate with high humidity so I keep dehumidifiers in my shop and try to maintain a constant dry climate for the lumber. If you are building with seasonal movement in mind it shouldn’t be a problem to make a chair in Arizona and ship it to Florida the wood will move, but you have made allowances for this so it will move in harmony with the piece. If the wood is not seasoned correctly before construction you could have a chair arm or back spring out of place, a dresser side could decide to curl and stop up all the drawers. When I first started out I was commissioned to make a set of wooden dinner plates from some local Myrtlewood. I went to my supplier and picked out the lumber. I took it home, milled it up and put finish on it. I went back to the shop the next day to package them and found they had turned into bowls. So my best advice is to leave the wood in your shop for as long as you can put up with before you get to it. Hope that helped.

-- Brian Noel

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1036 days


#4 posted 10-29-2015 01:53 AM

I had bought some kiln dried 2×4’s from lows to build a shelf in my garage, obviously they aren’t dried under 10% or whatever mills usually do it to. I let them sit in my garage, didn’t sticker them or anything, just laid on the ground. Every freaking one warped, one looked like a dang screw, and they were straight as an arrow when I bought them. Of course my question is regarding rough hardwood and not lowes lumber.

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bearkatwood

1194 posts in 471 days


#5 posted 10-29-2015 02:02 AM

By laying them on he ground if you have concrete especially they can react very badly. That is a very important aspect to sticker it.

-- Brian Noel

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1036 days


#6 posted 10-29-2015 02:06 AM

What about when they’re on a lumber rack off the ground, should I sticker them then? I haven’t mainly because my racks are full and haven’t had enough room to do so.

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bearkatwood

1194 posts in 471 days


#7 posted 10-29-2015 02:15 AM

If you are trying to season them and acclimate them you should definitely sticker them, you can use thin stickers, but they need that air flow.

-- Brian Noel

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1036 days


#8 posted 10-29-2015 02:20 AM

Dang, now I gotta figure out how to make that work with so much wood and so little room. Can’t wait to move and build a little building just for wood.

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bearkatwood

1194 posts in 471 days


#9 posted 10-29-2015 02:25 AM

One thing you can do is to pick your battles. Place the wood that you are not going to get to within the next few months outside stickered again with a roof to protect from rain and sun. Then mill up some stickers and stack your lumber up in order to be used. If you can make multiple stacks works good so you can cherry pick. You will be surprised the crazy areas you find to store it.

-- Brian Noel

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jmartel

6565 posts in 1610 days


#10 posted 10-29-2015 02:46 AM

The wood I buy usually sits for a while solely due to the fact that I buy whenever I find a good deal on craigslist and figure out what I’m going to make with it later.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2527 days


#11 posted 10-29-2015 02:56 AM

I tend to buy in bulk 400-500 bf at a time. My last house my shop was in the 3 car garage. I’m lucky now and have wood storage in my shop sufficient to keep it all in my shop. I let my stock set a couple weeks from the store minimum. I then take a piece and cut it and mill it and see what happens. I keep it stickered till its ready to use.

I take it down rough to about flat and skip planed. I sticker it and let it sit and watch it. If it starts moving better to catch it early. (1 week)

I then take it down to almost final dimensions and let it set again (at least a couple days)

Final dimension and let it set over night.

I know it’s a lot but give it time. Also, when thicknessing wood, I make sure to take equal amounts off both sides of the board.

Also accept you will get some boards that just don’t cooperate and move. chuck em in the kindling bin, if you use it you will only regret it. (don’t ask me how I know)

One thing I’ve learned over the years is patience. Burned my butt a couple times in my youth, and I lerned an expensive lesson. Good Luck and cheers.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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bearkatwood

1194 posts in 471 days


#12 posted 10-29-2015 03:19 AM

I agree with that kindling pile comment, On the good side it keeps the shop warm.

-- Brian Noel

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rwe2156

2187 posts in 940 days


#13 posted 10-29-2015 12:35 PM

Gixxer,

The issue is 1)fluctuating humidity, not the absolute humidity itself and 2) unequal moisture content on 2 faces. This is why resawing can be such a PITA.

Little things matter, too. For example, I have had wood cup because I stupidly put the panel under a fan. I also had a board cup because I left it under the task light on my bandsaw. It can happen in a matter of 30 minutes.

I recommend focusing on the environment of your shop. My shop is in a converted horse barn. It is not insulated, but it is fairly well sealed. I make sure the windows are closed and the doors are shut at night especially in the summer when the humidity always goes to 95% in the early morning.

I am fortunate to have a small climate controlled studio off my shop where I do my carving and designing.
I frequently sticker my freshly milled boards in there if I’m anticipating a storm or weather change.
I also do a alot of shrink wrapping and put boards in plastic bags to slow down the process.

You are correct in what you say about incremental millings. I usually take two or three light passes over the planer on on each side of the board (this is what’s important). I’ll do this 3 or even 4 times until I get to final thickness. If the wood is stable you don’t need as many steps. I also weight the boards down when stacking. I’ll usually put a couple heavy timbers (I’ve even used concrete blocks and cargo straps) especially with wide boards.

For your tabletop, I would sticker the wood inside the house if you think your shop environment fluctuates too much.

As far as the time necessary, that depends on what state your wood is in and the %humidity in your shop.
For example, if starting from rough air dried timber, I would expect to sticker the wood for at least a week between millings. If kiln dried and/or S3S lumber, it would be a few days probably.

Of course I would watch the wood and if its very stable maybe only a few days. I don’t use a moisture meter but probably should. I’ve done ok just watching the wood.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1036 days


#14 posted 10-29-2015 01:10 PM

Dealing with taking equal parts on both sides, usually I don’t pay attention enough to exact amounts of close to it. One confusing part is, if your board is cupped or bowed, it might take multiple passes on one side to get it flat while only a couple on the other. How do you get the exact amount of each side if you take, let’s say a 1/4” from the center of the board but just a 1/16” on the sides because then it’s flat?

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bearkatwood

1194 posts in 471 days


#15 posted 10-29-2015 01:22 PM

That is why letting the wood acclimate completely to your shop is so important. If you are patient and can wait months with the wood in your shop you can mill it without too much concern about milling equally. It really makes a big difference in how your work will go together. Patience grasshopper.

-- Brian Noel

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