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Forum topic by agallant posted 10-28-2015 01:13 AM 796 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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agallant

530 posts in 2353 days


10-28-2015 01:13 AM

Any recommendations or things to look our for when buying a router to mount to a tablesaw? I am picking up my new tablesaw on Friday and would like to use it as a router table too. I figure I can get a router plate at woodcraft when I but the saw and wanted to get a $100 +/- router from Home Depot


13 replies so far

View ElChe's profile

ElChe

630 posts in 803 days


#1 posted 10-28-2015 01:55 AM

Table mounted routers can get expensive like the Porter Cable and Milwaukee big boys. And then you end up having to get a lift so that you can adjust bit height above the table. A reasonable compromise is a Bosch 1617 evs with a 1125 base that allows above table adjustment with a hex key. It’s going to be more than 100 dollars. But other than panel bits it is a great router.

Variable speed, above table adjustment make life a lot easier.

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

View panamawayne's profile

panamawayne

69 posts in 926 days


#2 posted 10-28-2015 02:21 AM

I have the big Milwaukee and it’s been great, I believe you can drill a hole in the table for above table adjustment, i don’t mind bending a little to adjust it though.. variable speeds are great, especially with big bits and the soft start is nice as well.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2698 days


#3 posted 10-28-2015 04:36 AM

I have two Bosch 1617’s and a Triton 3 1/4 hp. They work well. One Bosch and the Triton are table mounted. I use the other Bosch in a plunge base for hand held operations.

FYI. Buy a router with a fixed base if it will be mounted under a table. O buy one that has a plunge base with the provision for removing the springs. That is what I did with the Triton.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View wbrisett's profile

wbrisett

201 posts in 1815 days


#4 posted 10-28-2015 09:37 AM

You don’t mention what type of saw (cabinet, hybrid, etc.), which can play into this. I personally like the option of taking a wing off a cabinet saw and using that with a replacement wing for the router. I like this because there are some limitations of using a router in a tablesaw and if you have room or decide that having a router on the saw isn’t for you, you can put the wing back on the saw.

I have a router on my saw and I do that because I have the Incra fence system which allowed me to easily use it with a router. However, I have messed up a few pieces on the router (imagine that!), and then needed to switch things over again to cut some additional pieces on the saw before I could use router again. It’s not a major thing, but a minor inconvenience that can drive a person crazy. So, that’s a consideration that honestly I didn’t think about enough before switching things over. That said, it is nice to have everything in a more compact space.

As far as routers go, I like panamawayne, have the big Milwaukee in my table because of the adjustable speed and the ease of making changes above the table (I should note that this is helped with the woodpecker lift). At the time I put the Milwaukee in the table a few years back, Triton was having some issues getting their product into the US due to huge wildfires (or so I was told). If I could have gotten my hands on the Triton, that would have been the router I would have gone with because of real ease of adjustments above the table. And that really can’t be understated… So think about these when looking for a router.

You never said what you want to do with your router, but usually when putting a router in a table you have something in mind (I was building cabinets and cabinet doors when I initially installed mine), and depending on what you want to do, you should keep horsepower in mind. I had no issues with a big 3 ½ HP router pushing all the oak from I used from the cabinets, but that’s overkill for some jobs. But certainly think about what it is that you want to use the router for, that will determine how big a router you need.

Also I, like several others here I’m sure, have multiple routers. I leave the big Milwaukee in the table 100% of the time. I have a smaller 2 ¼ HP Milwaukee that I use for out of the table jobs. The 3 ½ HP router is just too big to be comfortable using out of the table (I’m sure folks do it all the time, but I just find the size and weight too much to deal with).

Good luck!

View agallant's profile

agallant

530 posts in 2353 days


#5 posted 10-28-2015 10:57 AM

@Wbrisett

Saw: Sawstop 1.75 PCS with 52” rails

As for what do do with the router for starters I need to make some built in cabinates and will need it for the doors but there have been other times where I thought a router table would be useful.

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2410 posts in 1981 days


#6 posted 10-28-2015 11:12 AM

Maybe you have a space issue, maybe not. But I had a router in my last table saw, and swore I would never do that again. It is a bit like using a Shopsmith, having to change over by removing the safety guard on the table saw, lowering the blade, setting up the router, etc. And if you have overhead plugs, like I do, you would probably disconnect the router plug while using the table saw.

I think a much better option, one that I do use and like very much, is the Bosch RA1171 table. There are many reviews on it here and elsewhere. My favorites are it is actually a cabinet, so it catches all the down shavings. There is an exhaust port on the down side, but a lot of the chips will get captured by the cabinet. You can also store accessories in the cabinet. Metal plate that is very favorable for Bosch router. (I am biased since I own three Bosch units, one in my table and one 1617 for freehand, and one 1619 free hand that is my hog!

My past experience in router tables on table saws are you do this when you have some space limitations. But the changeover issues outweighs the benefits, IMHO.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View agallant's profile

agallant

530 posts in 2353 days


#7 posted 10-28-2015 10:10 PM

UPDATE:

Didn’t take me long but I was at wood craft after work picking up what I needed to make a router table out of my tablesaw and I saw a Bosch RA1171. I figured for $160 it was a better option and less effort. My shop is 14X36 and its strictly for my wood working, no lawn mower or anything so I think I can swing the extra space.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2698 days


#8 posted 10-29-2015 01:28 AM



UPDATE:

Didn t take me long but I was at wood craft after work picking up what I needed to make a router table out of my tablesaw and I saw a Bosch RA1171. I figured for $160 it was a better option and less effort. My shop is 14X36 and its strictly for my wood working, no lawn mower or anything so I think I can swing the extra space.

- agallant

The Bosch 1617 combo kit should work nicely with that table. Leave the fixed base attached to it. Slip the motor out and use it in the plunge base for other work. :-)

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View bearkatwood's profile

bearkatwood

1213 posts in 478 days


#9 posted 10-29-2015 01:49 AM

My vote is for an above the table height adjustment, mount a power switch with safety shutoff to the face of the table frame, If you can get a second fence to use as a router fence would be good or add in some t-track and build one. Build a box to house the router and hook it up to dust collection. If the table allows, build a drawer to house bits. One of those eliminator quick change collets would be nice…. Hmmmm, that’s all I can think up right now. If you have to wait a bit and save to get the good stuff, do it. You will kick yourself later if you go with so so. Quality tools can really make a difference.

-- Brian Noel

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7224 posts in 2842 days


#10 posted 10-29-2015 09:31 AM

Get one with variable speed, ample power, and preferably decent quality….Bosch, Milwaukee, DW, PC, Hitachi, Triton, Makita, etc. $100 is on the light side, but if that’s it, I’d check out the current Craftsman lineup.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4823 posts in 2515 days


#11 posted 10-29-2015 09:49 AM

I bought for $25.00 a hardly used 3HP Bosh router.

and a lift:

the table is Benchdog bought on Amazon:

-- Bert

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

16957 posts in 2655 days


#12 posted 10-29-2015 09:56 AM

Triton Routers are one of the few that do not require a lift for above the table adjustments. However it is more than 100. I have had mine on my table saw for yrs now and love it.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2698 days


#13 posted 10-29-2015 09:43 PM



UPDATE:

Didn t take me long but I was at wood craft after work picking up what I needed to make a router table out of my tablesaw and I saw a Bosch RA1171. I figured for $160 it was a better option and less effort. My shop is 14X36 and its strictly for my wood working, no lawn mower or anything so I think I can swing the extra space.

- agallant

I was at Lowe’s today and looked at that router table. It appears to have a multitude of hole patterns that will allow you to use almost any router. And yes, the Bosch 1617 has above the table height adjustment when you use the supplied hex key. It does require two wrenches to change bits.

The Triton will crank the entire bit above the table and locks the shaft so only one wrench is needed. It is an awesome machine. I would think all of the makes that are 3 1/4 hp are awesome also.

Note: I did notice the opening in the table isn’t very large…maybe three inches. If you p;an to use a rasised panel cutter in the future to cut panels for doors and/or drawer fronts, you will be in trouble. The big cutters are about 3 1/2 inches in diameter. I had the same problem with my shop buit table. I solve the problem by adding a piece of hardboard to make an auxiliary table top. I cut a large hole so the cutter would fit. Then I installed he cuter from above the table. I had just enough adjustment to cut the panels. Yep, I used the Bosch 1617. I ran it at it’s slowest rpm and made several passes until I got the desired look of the panel.

Hope this info helps.
Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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