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Forum topic by poopiekat posted 12-13-2009 12:16 AM 914 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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poopiekat

4226 posts in 3201 days


12-13-2009 12:16 AM

Topic tags/keywords: plane

I have a few old planes that are not nice to look at, mostly some pretty bad rust on them. I’ve hung onto them, thinking someday I’d find a way to resurface them, tune them up, with new thick cutters, and keep them close to the workbench. Rotary wire brushes and flap-wheel sanders are hopeless. When some reviews came out about this product called “Evapo-Rust” I hurried right down to the Lee Valley store and bought a gallon. Boy, was I disappointed when I used it!! I put in a variety of tool parts in a plastic container plus a rusty nail or two just to see the results. I was not happy with the results, despite following the instructions to the letter. Nothing came out any better than when it was immersed. Now… next question: I want to build a sandblast cabinet, capable of getting the job done of cleaning and surfacing small metal parts. I’m thinking ‘black beauty’ media material, (silicone carbide?), followed up by ground walnut shells.
Has anyone here on LJ resurfaced small metal tools and parts? What media worked best for you? Has anyone done the reverse-anode method in Borax and water, and gotten good results?
Or… is this why there are so many totes and knobs for planes listed on eBay…because the planes they were on got scrapped. Who knows the right way to do this?

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!


7 replies so far

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BlankMan

1488 posts in 2820 days


#1 posted 12-13-2009 12:36 AM

How long did you let it soak? I think the directions say 30 minutes, if that’s what you did that could be why it didn’t work. Let it soak overnight, or a full day, don’t be impatient, the stuff works and works well. I haven’t found anything yet that it did not remove the rust from. If it can clean up the drill chuck pictured in the link below I would think it could clean up your planes.

Evapo Rust Examples

I’ve got more personal examples I can show too.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

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poopiekat

4226 posts in 3201 days


#2 posted 12-13-2009 01:09 AM

Thanks, Blankman!
The parts I used were of minimal value, and so I let them soak for up to 48 hours. Some came out after 24, with monitoring every few hours. I was so optimistic for good results!! Knowing that it might not be effective on anything but steel or cast iron, that’s why I put in a few examples of things that are definitely magnetic. The only possible explanation otherwise is that I perhaps had too many items in too little solvent?
GMman….man does not live by link alone…..I’m asking for feedback from people who restore tools, thank you.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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MedicKen

1610 posts in 2929 days


#3 posted 12-13-2009 01:17 AM

Did you wire brush the parts after soaking? Put a wire brush on a 6 or 8” bench grinder and brush the parts after the evaporust.FYI Borax and water will NOT work. You must use Washing Soda for the best results and a good 12V charger

-- My job is to give my kids things to discuss with their therapist....medic20447@gmail.com

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BlankMan

1488 posts in 2820 days


#4 posted 12-13-2009 01:29 AM

Hey when I first bought it I picked it up at HF and only bought a quart because I had absolutely no confidence what so ever that it would work being that HF was selling it. Next day I went and bought 2 gallons. With all the stuff I’ve been restoring I think I’m up to 10 gallons now.

It only works on ferrous material that be iron and steel. Don’t know that you put too much stuff in it, don’t think so because when I was doing these drill press tables that were 18”x18” and bases 18”x 24” it cleaned them up right fast. Well, that being 24 hours or so. The one pictured was small comparatively. But it beats any other process like wire brushes or wheels or sanding and gets in places you can’t. But don’t be skimpy with it, when you’re soaking something make sure it’s covered well and at room temperature. Don’t know for sure but it’s possible cold might affect it.

It should work until it turns black and then some. Once mine turns black I continue to use it but have noticed the parts get a gray coating on them if left in too long, but that could be due to that part too.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

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poopiekat

4226 posts in 3201 days


#5 posted 12-13-2009 01:34 AM

Thanks, MedicKen!
Yes, I’ve wirebrushed, both manually and rotary brushed…. yes, I misspoke, off the top of my head, I have a box of washing soda for a future project. I’m guessing I used too little solvent, though everything was immersed. It was black after about 4 hours, and that was 2 plane cutters, 2 chipbreakers, 1 cap iron, two long-rods (Stanley 45) and a few rusty steel screws and nails, all in about 16 ounces of Evapo-Rust, covered by about one inch of solvent. At $30/gallon Canadian, I could just buy replacement irons and cutters cheaper than restoring them in solvent. I’ll just do the items that are not easily replaced, for that money…

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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BlankMan

1488 posts in 2820 days


#6 posted 12-13-2009 01:42 AM

Oh and you don’t really have to monitor it, it really only attacks the rust and not the base metal so there is really no such thing as leaving it in too long. I read up on it when I first started using it and it only reacts with the rust molecules (iron oxide) and not the iron in the base metal. If I remember correctly that was due to the oxygen atoms in the rust molecules i.e. it being iron oxide.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3316 posts in 3290 days


#7 posted 12-13-2009 02:11 AM

I just use mineral spirits and wet dry sand 320 grits. By keeping the paper wet with the m.spirits it keep the dust partial from becoming airborne. A little elbow grease and you’ll be amazed at how the metal cleans up right before you restoration eyes…also letting the part just soak in mineral spirits before sanding helps. Any brass part I use steel wool and a fine tooth brush size brass brush. This method allow you to salvage the natural patina of some of the old old planes but if your into shine brite metal just keep on sanding either way this is the method I use and will continue to use on all my restored planes….Blkcherry

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