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Stanley #5 with a knick in the iron

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Forum topic by Shane posted 10-26-2015 01:13 PM 983 views 0 times favorited 30 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Shane

294 posts in 1278 days


10-26-2015 01:13 PM

I’m having trouble with my #5. I’m very new to hand planes and I’m not sure how to repair the iron so that I can sharpen it when it has a knick out of the end of the iron. Any help would be appreciated.


30 replies so far

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1147 days


#1 posted 10-26-2015 01:19 PM

It depends how deep the knick is. If it’s very shallow I will just sharpen the iron as normal until the knick disappears. If it’s a deep knick I will grind the blade back at 90 degrees to the grinder/wheel/sandpaper/etc. until the knick is gone creating a flat on the iron than return to the bevel to recreate the edge. Both ways work I just find the 2nd method is a bit faster but it can remove a lot of steel very quickly since you are removing just a edge of steel.

As long as you have good length on the iron you should be fine grinding the knick away. They happen from time to time and just something you have to work with.

View Ripthorn's profile

Ripthorn

1406 posts in 2452 days


#2 posted 10-26-2015 01:24 PM

If you do grind, just be careful not to get it too hot, as you can ruin the temper on the blade if you grind too heavily handed.

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1546 posts in 3228 days


#3 posted 10-26-2015 01:37 PM

Ripthorn is absolutely right. A grinder can quickly ruin the blade’s temper.

Maybe it’s time to treat yourself to a new blade. A Hock blade and chipbreaker will make the old #5 perform as never before.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1471 posts in 2105 days


#4 posted 10-26-2015 02:48 PM

If you have a diamond stone it should be no problem to remove the nick by hand using a honing guide. (And it won’t ruin the temper of the blade.) Even with sandpaper on a flat stone, I’ve done it.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 947 days


#5 posted 10-26-2015 03:53 PM

Grinding a deep nick back with a diamond stone is a lot of work (too much for me).

I grind the edge back to good metal.

I do this by marking a square line across blade back with a ‘sharp’ sharpie and grind it square to the line.
If you have a bench grinder jig you don’t need to do this.

Then regrind the bevel to 25 degrees. You will have a hollow ground blade, which makes sharpening a lot faster. Then I hand sharpen to 27.5 or 30 degrees (basically a secondary bevel).

If you’re slightly off square, you can correct that when sharpening.
It about the only time I will use a honing jig.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Shane's profile

Shane

294 posts in 1278 days


#6 posted 10-26-2015 04:30 PM

Thanks guys, I will try to square it off and then resharpen.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1471 posts in 2105 days


#7 posted 10-26-2015 04:38 PM

According to my old machinist friend, you need to keep a cup of water by the grinder and grind, dip, grind, dip to keep the edge cool. Don’t let it get near red hot. I personally would not grind it – and certainly not square, since that will use up more steel than necessary. You can square it up with the honing jig if you keep most pressure down on the wheel and relatively light pressure on the edge of the iron – so that the wheel, rather than the existing edge – controls the angle.

It all depends on how much time you are willing to put into it. It might take an hour with sandpaper – a 1/2 hour with the diamond stone to start and sandpaper to finish. That’s all the way to razor sharp. If you square it on the grinder, you’ll then have to grind the new bevel which will also take time.

When using the honing jig I count my strokes. 100 strokes, take a look, 100 more etc. It helps alot with the patience thing. ;-) You’ll need to use a stone or sandpaper to flatten the back anyway. You might as well do the bevel there as well. Yeah, you might have a cramp in your hand, but you’ll get used to it.

-Paul

View Don W's profile

Don W

17971 posts in 2034 days


#8 posted 10-26-2015 05:05 PM

you square it because it will not over heat as easy, and you still only remove as much as the depth of the nick, so you don’t use any more of the iron.

grind, dip, grind, dip to keep the edge cool works just fine. Go slow is still faster than by hand. Make sure the stone is dressed slightly higher in the middle and keep the iron moving.

As was already stated, make the iron flat for at least 1/8” from the edge.

If it takes more than 10 or 15 minutes, its become a career.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

14627 posts in 2150 days


#9 posted 10-26-2015 05:12 PM

Come on up to the Dungeon Shop this evening! Not only will I show you how to do this sort of thing, you’ll wind up with a well fettled plane, ready to go.

Need the address? PM for details!

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13738 posts in 2085 days


#10 posted 10-26-2015 05:14 PM

“If it takes more than 10 or 15 minutes, its become a career.”

Love that!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View bearkatwood's profile

bearkatwood

1214 posts in 478 days


#11 posted 10-26-2015 06:10 PM

You could use it to make tongue and grove joints ;)
Jokes,
all the answers above are great. Love that career bit!

-- Brian Noel

View Tim's profile

Tim

3119 posts in 1428 days


#12 posted 10-26-2015 06:39 PM



Ripthorn is absolutely right. A grinder can quickly ruin the blade s temper.

Maybe it s time to treat yourself to a new blade. A Hock blade and chipbreaker will make the old #5 perform as never before.

- 8iowa

A grinder can take the temper out of a blade quickly, but there’s no reason to be afraid of them. For one thing if you ruin the temper the blade isn’t ruined, it’s just not as hard and will dull faster. For another it’s not that hard to learn to grind without ruining them. Definitely don’t grind anywhere near red hot, in fact if you stop when it’s hot to the touch you’ll be well below ruining the temper which takes more like 400 degrees.

As others said, depending on how deep the nick, grind square first to the bottom of the nick then grind in the bevel almost all the way. The thinner metal is harder to grind without overheating it. Then either grind much slower and dunk more often or just finish the last bit with the coarsest stone you have or some sandpaper.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13738 posts in 2085 days


#13 posted 10-26-2015 06:48 PM

If you work with edge tools (planes, chisels, etc), the time will come that a grinder is in play. Hand cranked or power, doesn’t matter, but they’re tools to get used to.

Grind, dip, grind, dip. That’s more than advise, it’s a mantra.

Give it a try. If replacing the cutter were your first option, there’s no penalty for messing up your OEM cutter.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1471 posts in 2105 days


#14 posted 10-26-2015 07:11 PM

I want to clarify that I wasn’t criticizing anybody’s advice to grind. I’m just not comfortable using a grinder. I only use mine to sharpen lawn-mower blades. I’m cautious to a fault and more patient than is probably good for me. So, I have “ground” with sandpaper. I’m sure it’s a bad use of my time. I’m trying not to sharpen anything for awhile – ‘cause I get caught up in just sharpening this and that and never doing any woodworking.

-Paul

View SignWave's profile

SignWave

321 posts in 2502 days


#15 posted 10-26-2015 08:14 PM

I have a hybrid approach for when I need to restore an edge. I find that the risk when using a grinder is greatest at the tip (i.e. the cutting edge of the bevel), so when I have a damaged edge that I need to grind back a lot, I grind on the underside of the bevel and avoid the tip. This removes the bulk of the material while minimizing the risk of ruining the heat treatment. I still grind/dip/grind/dip though.

Then I use sandpaper and a flat surface (granite tile) to remove from the cutting edge and restore the shape of the bevel. Since the grinder removed the bulk of the material, it is faster to get the bevel back to where it needs to be. Once the bevel is re-formed, I use wetstones to sharpen.

As always, YMMV. I just find this combination of methods seems to shorten the time it takes, while reducing the risk from grinder damage. It isn’t the most simple way, though.

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

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