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Forum topic by Kurt T. Kneller posted 10-26-2015 02:13 AM 666 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Kurt T. Kneller

104 posts in 825 days


10-26-2015 02:13 AM

I have just completed my router table cabinet and and getting ready to build the top.
I have a few questions and am looking for some advice.
My plan is to use (2) layers of 3/4 MDF and (1) layer of 3/4 baltic birch. Both sides will be laminated. The top will be trimmed with 3/4” red oak.
My questions are as follows:
1) should I route the openings first before laminating – I worry that I may crack the laminate during rolling – what have you done?
2) should I trim first or laminate first – I feel that laminating first then adding the trim would help protect the edge of the laminate, but on the other hand it probably would be easier to laminate over the trim
3) as far as attaching the trim – I was thinking of using biscuits between the trim and plywood, glue and clamp
or should I just use glue clamps and brads

I have been working on this for most the summer and I really like how it has turned out so far. I would really hate to screw this up now.

Any advice or recommendations would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

-- Start with ten, end with ten.......


6 replies so far

View bearkatwood's profile

bearkatwood

1194 posts in 472 days


#1 posted 10-26-2015 12:42 PM

I have always like to trim first and then add on the laminate cut close to the right size. Then come back with a trim router and either a flush trim bit or a 45 angled bit to give the trim a little accent. If you have the laminate down well, use a good bit and work slowly it shouldn’t crack on you.

-- Brian Noel

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bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2528 days


#2 posted 10-26-2015 02:46 PM

I built mine back in 2003 (I think), and used Norms plans. I used two pieces of 3/4” mdf sandwiched together and screwed to keep in tight, and banded in oak, and topped with formica, and trimmed. I then routed for the plate. I used a woodpecker’s PRL, and spent the 10$ to buy the template. Used a pattern bit, and had enough material that i did a practice piece, to make sure my technique was down pat. Worked fine and she’s still goin strong today.

https://flic.kr/p/96WU78

Good luck and cheers

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1738 posts in 599 days


#3 posted 10-26-2015 07:21 PM

I used 2 layers of 3/4 MDF laminated on both sides as well. I did my glue up then laminated both sides at the same time. After laminates were cured, I went around with a flush trim bit then did the hardwood edging with glue and brads. After that was all done, the last thing was to do the cutout and routing for the plate and miter channel.

Can I ask what the purpose of the layer of BB ply is? That seems like a bit of overkill unless you’ve just got a really big table without much support.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Kurt T. Kneller's profile

Kurt T. Kneller

104 posts in 825 days


#4 posted 10-26-2015 07:59 PM



I used 2 layers of 3/4 MDF laminated on both sides as well. I did my glue up then laminated both sides at the same time. After laminates were cured, I went around with a flush trim bit then did the hardwood edging with glue and brads. After that was all done, the last thing was to do the cutout and routing for the plate and miter channel.

Can I ask what the purpose of the layer of BB ply is? That seems like a bit of overkill unless you ve just got a really big table without much support.

- HokieKen

The extra layer of plywood is for better attachment to the cabinet. The table is not overly large about 24 X 40.
The cabinet is rather heavy and will be rolled around to use. I also have the added weight of a lift and thought the plywood would help keep things flat. There is adequate framing below for support.

-- Start with ten, end with ten.......

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HokieKen

1738 posts in 599 days


#5 posted 10-26-2015 08:08 PM


The extra layer of plywood is for better attachment to the cabinet. The table is not overly large about 24 X 40.
The cabinet is rather heavy and will be rolled around to use. I also have the added weight of a lift and thought the plywood would help keep things flat. There is adequate framing below for support.

- Kurt T. Kneller

I see. I was just curious since that’s more “beef” than most tables I’ve seen. I’m always leery of using dissimilar materials when flatness is a concern for reasons of having the 2 faces balanced. I don’t see why it should be a concern for you though since both materials are stable and the 2 outer pieces will be the same.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Kurt T. Kneller's profile

Kurt T. Kneller

104 posts in 825 days


#6 posted 10-27-2015 01:08 AM


I see. I was just curious since that s more “beef” than most tables I ve seen. I m always leery of using dissimilar materials when flatness is a concern for reasons of having the 2 faces balanced. I don t see why it should be a concern for you though since both materials are stable and the 2 outer pieces will be the same.

- HokieKen

Now that you mention it and the more I think about it, it does seem like overkill. I think that I’ll omit it and use the BB for some table saw / router table jigs.

Thanks to all that have commented.

-- Start with ten, end with ten.......

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