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refurbish old whetstone

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Forum topic by kcrandy posted 12-12-2009 02:09 AM 1450 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kcrandy

285 posts in 2897 days


12-12-2009 02:09 AM

I have an old (50 years at least) whetstone that has some pits and a few paint splatters on one side. Wondering if there is a process to refurbish a old whetstone.

-- Caulk and paint are a poor carpenter's best friends


5 replies so far

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patron

13537 posts in 2806 days


#1 posted 12-12-2009 02:14 AM

all i’ve ever heard of ,
is rubbing it on flat cement

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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kcrandy

285 posts in 2897 days


#2 posted 12-12-2009 05:17 AM

Wow, is this a great site, or what? Fast response. I think I can find some flat cement.

-- Caulk and paint are a poor carpenter's best friends

View cosmicturner's profile

cosmicturner

403 posts in 2860 days


#3 posted 12-12-2009 04:37 PM

Thanks I have a few of them

-- Cosmicturner

View 1yeldud1's profile

1yeldud1

301 posts in 2507 days


#4 posted 02-15-2010 04:31 AM

As a tool maker what I do is get the “grit” from the table of a surface grinder, cylindrical grinder or pedistal grinder and sprinkle a small amount of it on a flat plate of steel—about twice the size of your stone. Moisten this “grit” with some type of oil (WD40 – light motor oil – etc) then procede to work the combination stone in a circular motion adding “grit” and oil as required. This “grit” is actually the reminants from dressing a grinding wheel – ask anyone in the toolmaking business and I’m shure they would get you a small box full with no problem – as this is a commodity that generally gets thrown in the trash as they clean their grinders.

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kcrandy

285 posts in 2897 days


#5 posted 02-18-2010 04:59 AM

1yeldud1
Thanks so much. best answer yet!

-- Caulk and paint are a poor carpenter's best friends

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