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Forum topic by Stohlie posted 10-22-2015 04:23 PM 495 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Stohlie

3 posts in 408 days


10-22-2015 04:23 PM

Hi all. I’m a woodworking novice and need some help. I’m making a barnwood (2x) table and the 45’s are already joined and the 5 center boards fit snugly in the frame. My questions:
Can I force a bow out of one of the centerboards.. Without it warping whole table top?
Should middle boards be snug? Will boards expand and crack frame?
Table is rustic … Rough side up, bottom planed, for outside patio, not going to be a fine furniture pc


6 replies so far

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ForestGrl

445 posts in 547 days


#1 posted 10-22-2015 09:30 PM

I’m no expert on tables, but especially if it’s an outdoor table, the boards are going to expand and shrink with the weather, even with a finish on it, so you need a design that permits that. First thing to make sure of, in terms of your question, is that the terminology is accurate. So, just in case, take a look at the picture on this page right) and verify it’s a bow of which you speak. If it’s not, tell us what kind of warping that board has. :-) Then you’ll need some advice from table-builders about what kind of design and specific technique will work.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

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Stohlie

3 posts in 408 days


#2 posted 10-22-2015 09:56 PM

The center boards (which i havent attached yet)have various twists and bows that I can fix to suit me by clamping .. I plan on using pocket screws to assemble … My fear is that when I remove the clamps the whole table top could warp from the …pressure (?). Am I just being paranoid

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ForestGrl

445 posts in 547 days


#3 posted 10-23-2015 03:30 AM


The center boards (which i havent attached yet)have various twists and bows that I can fix to suit me by clamping .. I plan on using pocket screws to assemble … My fear is that when I remove the clamps the whole table top could warp from the …pressure (?). Am I just being paranoid

- Stohlie

Nope, you should be concerned. Wood is going to do what it needs to, responding to inherent tension. I seriously doubt your clamps and pocket screws will prevent that. Still, I’d sure like some table-builders to pitch in on this thread! They can give you specifics. Might be helpful if you could post a picture or two.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

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Yonak

979 posts in 982 days


#4 posted 10-23-2015 04:31 AM

Stohlie, I agree with Forestgrl. The best way to deal with the warping boards is to use them in their relaxed state. That is, re-surface the crooks out of them. Of course, they may not end up being the size you want after cutting them flat and square. That would mean you’ll either have to re-work your design, get other boards or be satisfied with a table with crooked boards. It is rustic, after all. Do you plan to bring it inside or cover it when not in use ?

Outdoor tables normally are made with gaps between the boards for the top (think of a picnic table or a deck). This allows water to drain between the boards and not puddle plus, if you have a frame around it, the wood movement will not stress the frame.

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Stohlie

3 posts in 408 days


#5 posted 10-25-2015 03:26 AM

It will be on a covered patio and covered for the winter. The purpose behind not planing both sides was I wanted the roughsawn finish on the top… If I plane or sand the boards flatter I ll lose this finish..

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Yonak

979 posts in 982 days


#6 posted 10-25-2015 02:09 PM

It seems like the best solution may be to plane the bottoms of the boards flat and as parallel to the tops as possible and live with a somewhat rocky top.

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