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Trunnion Adjustment needed

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Forum topic by Douglas Bordner posted 2502 days ago 3483 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Douglas Bordner

3963 posts in 2695 days


2502 days ago

Try I as might to avoid it, it looks as though I will need to adjust my table saw trunnions. I have heard that the PALS system makes this not so daunting, and I wondered if anyone has experience with this, or general trunnion adjustment in general.
Thanks for your time and knowledge.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.


21 replies so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12262 posts in 2729 days


#1 posted 2502 days ago

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6647 posts in 2611 days


#2 posted 2502 days ago

Hi Douglas;

What is the problem your having EXACTLY?

What is the PALS system, I’ve never heard of that.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2668 days


#3 posted 2502 days ago

Hey Douglas,

I use the PALS on both the front and rear trunion bolts on my saw. If the front is withing a range that allows for you to set your saw from just the rear trunion, then the PALS make this VERY easy. If you have to make an ajustment on the front, then it’s more daunting as the right front bolt is really hard to get to in a contractors saw. I recommend the PALS with 5/5 stars.

Lee, PALS are a trunion ajustment tool made by In Line Industries. They work really well. You could machine them yourself, but they are cheap and hassle free.

Tom

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View coloradoclimber's profile

coloradoclimber

548 posts in 2699 days


#4 posted 2502 days ago

Douglas,

You are having a blade to mitre slot alignment problem?

Are you talking a contractors saw or a cabinet saw? I’ve run across multiple videos on the web on this topic, for both types of saws. I’ve adjusted the top, not the trunnions, on a cabinet saw.

Adjusting the alignment on a cabinet saw is pretty simple, loosen the bolts holding the table top to the cabinet, tap the top around until you get it where you like it, tighten it back down. Similar on a contractors saw but since the trunnion is mounted to the table top from the bottom you have to get underneath and loosen the trunnion from the top. Then tap the trunnion around under the saw relative to the table then tighten it all back down.

Or are you talking some other trunnion adjustment?

View coloradoclimber's profile

coloradoclimber

548 posts in 2699 days


#5 posted 2502 days ago

I just looked at the PALS. It looks like it trades the “tapping the trunnion” method for turning screws to push things around. Looks like it ought to work. I’ve never adjusted the top to trunnion alignment on a contractors saw so these might make it simpler. But on a cabinet saw the loosen and tap methods works very well, simple and no problem getting it dead on.

You might try the tapping it method before you pony up for the PALS. It’s free to try and it’s not like you’re going to hurt anything. If the tapping method doesn’t work for you you can always buy the PALS and use those.

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2668 days


#6 posted 2502 days ago

Climber…the nice thing about PALS is that you can get things as close to perfect as your measuring system allows for…ie, using a micrometer, or using some mechanical square. You can creep up on square. There is then a locking nut that attempts to keep the entire thing in square. The big problem with contractor saws is that when you tilt some of them to 45 degrees, they come out of alignment. Mine being one of them. Waiting for Dug to give some more specific info.

Cheers!

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3963 posts in 2695 days


#7 posted 2502 days ago

First off, it’s a Jet 10˝ contractor’s saw. Trouble seems to be a lack of parallelism with the miter slot. The rear of the blade pinches the wood on a rip cut, and in adjusting the fence to clear up the burning etc, it looks to me that the rear of the blade is perhaps a 16th closer than the front to the miter slot. Tom, when you say “If the front is withing a range that allows for you to set your saw from just the rear trunion”, how do you determine that range? I have heard it’s best not to loosen both trunnions, just the rear, at least at first. I do not have the A-line-it slot riding extrusion, but I do have a dial indicator, with a heavy base.

What would you suggest as a first step in the diagnostic progression to rule out “out-of range”-ness? I used to know a guy that would do the whole thing if you bought the PALS hardware, but:
A) I’m cheap
B) With winter coming on I usually don’t do much in the garage shop after the pre-Christmas wooden gift push
C) It’s been broken relatively speaking for some time and I have managed to work around it for a bit now and
D) I’m cheap

Thanks, fellows.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View Sawdust2's profile

Sawdust2

1467 posts in 2719 days


#8 posted 2502 days ago

Positron-Annihilation. Lifetime Spectroscopy

Oh, now I see the link

-- No piece is cut too short. It was meant for a smaller project.

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3963 posts in 2695 days


#9 posted 2502 days ago

I’ve heard that Lifetime Spectroscopy can be painful.

Frankly at first read Lee I thought:
A) You were responding accidentally to another post
B) You spent most of Saturday night in a sweat lodge with a parcel of peyote buttons
C) What is my sudden fascination with outlining my responses.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2668 days


#10 posted 2502 days ago

Douglas,

When I bought my tablesaw, the blade was not in alignment with the mitre slot. When I moved the trunions as much as I could, it was closer, but still not on. I had exhausted the range of simply adjusting the rear trunion. I had to adjust the front as well. That’s what I meant. You find that out by moving the trunion and if you get adjustment perfect, then you’re golden. If it doesn’t get all the way there without overshooting, then you have to adjust both.

Also, with trunion adjusting, from the back of the saw, I’d loosen both back bolts, and the one that is on the right hand side of the front…WHILE LOOKING FROM THE BACK! Hit the rear trunion in the direction you want, with a dead blow hammer. Measure the alignment. Go back and forth as needed. If you just loosen the rear trunion and gain alignment, it won’t last as you have built some tensions into the system by not loosening that front bolt a smidgen.

Just my way.

With the pals, you eliminate that “hit it with a dead blow hammer,” step and can just creep up on it.

Cheers!

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Sawdust2's profile

Sawdust2

1467 posts in 2719 days


#11 posted 2502 days ago

You go ahead and google “PALS system” and see what you get.

-- No piece is cut too short. It was meant for a smaller project.

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 2628 days


#12 posted 2501 days ago

Douglas – sorry that I didn’t read everything stated above, but I have done this before after reading the Duginske text that Wayne referred to above. It was really simple: just slightly loosened the rear and knocked it where I wanted, dead even with the miter slot. I did have to crack the front bolts loose too, and would anticipate that you’d have to do the same if you’re really off by 1/16” from front to back of the blade. I’d be happy to copy the necessary pages from the book and sewnd them to you. Also, have you checked your blade for runout? Not that the blade would be off by that much, but it could contribute to the distance to the slot, if it’s not true. I’d check that first to be sure the blade is within .003”

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2668 days


#13 posted 2501 days ago

How about googling PALS alignment and see watcha git.

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View coloradoclimber's profile

coloradoclimber

548 posts in 2699 days


#14 posted 2501 days ago

If the saw is aligned at 90 but off at 45 the table is tilted front to back with the trunnion. To compensate you need to shim the table to trunnion. Remove the front or back table bolts on a cabinet saw, and I assume front or back on a contractors saw, add some shims, tighten it all back up. If the table is already aligned at 90 you should only need to remove the front OR back and not need to loosen the other side.

I have done this adjustment on a cabinet saw. Same one I had to adjust the table alignment. Same one I had to grind the freaking trunnions on to get reach full 90 and 45. Yes, as a matter of fact, it was a Grizzly. Grizzly 1023 Cabinet saw to be exact. I was not impressed. Although after many hours of work it did turn out to be a reasonable saw.

View coloradoclimber's profile

coloradoclimber

548 posts in 2699 days


#15 posted 2501 days ago

Douglas,

I’ve done this on a cabinet saw and it sounds like at least Dorje and Tom have done it on a contractor saw. It really is not daunting at all. It looks like it might be more of a drag on a contractors saw just because you have to get under the saw. On a cabinet saw it is simple, and pretty much fool proof, there is no reason not to do it.

Google table saw adjustment, or table saw alignment, or something like that. I know I’ve seen multiple videos on just this procedure.

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