LumberJocks

any good planer/jointer honing stones (without removing the knives from the machine) ?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by willhime posted 10-20-2015 06:36 PM 743 views 1 time favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View willhime's profile

willhime

81 posts in 999 days


10-20-2015 06:36 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jig question planer jointer sharpening

I’m trying to find the efficacy of a honing stone that sharpens or hones the knives while still in the machine. The range I’ve found on Amazon is roughly $15-50. Are these just gimmicks, or actually worth buying ? As a sushi chef, I’m all good on unaided sharpening on wet stones, but it would be really nice to not have to go the extra mile and remove them, sharpen, hone, then putting them back in.

Brands I found are:
Steelex
Ouyzaab
WoodRiver
Big Horn

-- Burn your fire for no witness


7 replies so far

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 690 days


#1 posted 10-20-2015 07:33 PM

One thing I have done is set my out feed table about 2 thousands below my knifes and then make my infeed the same height. Then clamp a board to the indeed to rest a stone against. If the stone is 6” long the board clamped to the indeed would be 3” from the cutterhead. Place one layer of thin paper on the stone. Back up, turn the jointer on, resting the heel of the stone against the board slowly lower the stone to the cutter head and work it back and forth.

Oh, get right with God first.

I won’t do it again. Height is perfect but it puts a radius on the edge which affects performance.

As far as the stones you mentioned, I wouldnt. Send them out to be pro ground.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1735 posts in 598 days


#2 posted 10-20-2015 07:56 PM

As a machinist, I always had a drawer full of different stones for different purposes. I still have that drawer in my wood shop and router bits, drill bits and saw teeth see them often. For what you’re talking about, a fine india stone and a translucent Arkansas stone are what I would recommend. I prefer small “slip stones” that I can use a diamond stone to shape as I need them. That’s what I would use for a quick hone or a “touch-up”. You’ll need to know your business with free-hand sharpening though. I would use some machinists dye to make sure you are honing the bevel all the way to the edge and hone both adjacent faces. Also, with a planer/jointer, you’ll want to make sure take the same # of strokes with each stone on each knife. Otherwise you’ll have to reset them to the same height which kinda defeats the purpose. Generally speaking, honing in this manner is not going to give you an edge that will last very long. It will give you a clean, sharp edge if done properly though.

BTW, those stones assume the use of HSS blades. If you have carbide, you’re gonna want diamonds.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1140 days


#3 posted 10-20-2015 07:59 PM

Are your planner knives indexed with pins in the planner? If so if you sharpen them you will change the position of the knives in relation to the rollers. My understanding is knives with index pins are disposable and not suppose to be sharpened. A jointer is a different story however and those can be sharpened. I have never tried any of the in machine options but as long as the jack screws are set snug (not overly tight) against the bottom before removing them reinstalling them should be pretty close and those you can probably sharpen by hand.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4852 posts in 2273 days


#4 posted 10-20-2015 08:00 PM

I say replace them. Standard jointer knives are very inexpensive, and honing in place will never be quite as good as a new set of knives. Recycle the old ones, because having them resharpened costs more than a new set.

If you get tired of messing with jointer knives, upgrade to a segmented cutterhead with carbide inserts.

Good luck with it.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

423 posts in 585 days


#5 posted 10-20-2015 11:05 PM



I say replace them. Standard jointer knives are very inexpensive, and honing in place will never be quite as good as a new set of knives. Recycle the old ones, because having them resharpened costs more than a new set.

If you get tired of messing with jointer knives, upgrade to a segmented cutterhead with carbide inserts.

Good luck with it.

- pintodeluxe

I’d be worried about what I might do to the tables. OP mentioned jointer/planer so I’m guessing it’s what I know as “jointer”. Would seem that sharpening in place would require alignment of one or more knives anyway. Reminds me though to “suck it up” and buy the holder for the Tormek ($$ouch). I think I have 3 sets waiting.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

686 posts in 1258 days


#6 posted 10-21-2015 12:36 AM

I sharpen my knifes in the jointer I also sharpen my knive out of the machine.My jointer has a pin that holds the head in the same place for every knife.That maybe the differance for those that don’t find it worth while.
I do a much better job than any sharpening sevice,I start at 40 degree,After the bevel angles gets past 45 time to send them out for regrinding they come back to me @ 38. Then the whole thing starts over.I use M2,T1, and some steel knives called opti steel,that has a black coating on the face.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2187 posts in 940 days


#7 posted 10-21-2015 12:08 PM

By the time knives are dull, then need grinding, not honing.

Resharpen or buy new blades.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com