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No4 - Restoration - Opinion

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Forum topic by Mambrax posted 10-20-2015 05:52 PM 714 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mambrax

139 posts in 952 days


10-20-2015 05:52 PM

I’m restoring a No4 Stanley. Nothing special there. However it’s clearly a 1942-45 model due to the black paint left over on the handles. I’m on the fence : do I keep the black to restore it original condition or do I finish the wood “classic”
Please give me your opinion !
Cheers,

-- Let's do the best we can !


12 replies so far

View lepelerin's profile

lepelerin

478 posts in 1785 days


#1 posted 10-20-2015 06:03 PM

it’s a matter of choice. How would you prefer it. What do you intend to do with it, sell it, use it ???
Your choice is the answer.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13713 posts in 2079 days


#2 posted 10-20-2015 06:10 PM

It depends on you!

Any chance of adding more ‘whorwartwotypes’ to the arsenal? If so, you’ll want to treat them the same, just from an OCD perspective. That said, the wood under the paint hasn’t amounted to much in the ‘looks’ category, so paint would work fine. Getting it to look like rosewood will be tough, in other words.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1735 posts in 599 days


#3 posted 10-20-2015 08:13 PM

I have done 2 planes that had the painted knob/tote. I stripped them both down to bare wood and finished with BLO. It doesn’t look like rosewood, but it doesn’t look like paint either. I just like the look of the hardwood and the feel of oiled wood. Doesn’t make ‘em work any better though! Like the others said, if it’s a user, do it any way you damn well please :) If you want to paint it hot pink and wrap it with duct tape, it’s nobody’s business but yours.

If, on the other hand, you intend to sell it, I’d stick with the paint. Keeping it as true as possible to it’s original condition will most likely get you a better selling price.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Mambrax's profile

Mambrax

139 posts in 952 days


#4 posted 10-20-2015 09:31 PM

First thanks,
Two : I’ll be keeping it for myself.
Three: I thought it will be historically significant to restore to the original condition with black handle, and a nice piece of conversation. I think it’s need to see how world event will influence apparently non related thing.
Thanks

-- Let's do the best we can !

View Don W's profile

Don W

17958 posts in 2028 days


#5 posted 10-20-2015 10:07 PM

Once I strip it, it doesn’t get painted again, even if I’m selling it. I personally think it sells better. Maybe, maybe not. I’ve also found rosewood under that black paint.

But as others have said, make it yours.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View Mambrax's profile

Mambrax

139 posts in 952 days


#6 posted 10-20-2015 10:23 PM

Oh, yes, it’s rosewood for sure on mine. Thanks for the input.

-- Let's do the best we can !

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3652 posts in 1726 days


#7 posted 10-20-2015 10:42 PM

I totally agree with DonW. He’s the Master Jedi of hand planes here. As he says, do.

View upchuck's profile

upchuck

540 posts in 1125 days


#8 posted 10-21-2015 01:35 AM

Mambrax-
WWII wood working planes were pushed out the door with many different parts and procedures left out or added. Pushed out the door I believe is the phrase. Shipping was the critical shortage for much of the war period. Until the Liberty Ships were cranked out in great numbers the U-boats were sinking ships faster than they could be built. And a certain percentage of each shipment ended up at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. They need 100 #4 planes in England? Order 130. Especially during the early years of the war. By the summer of 1943 the U-boat threat began to diminish.
There was never a shortage of Rosewood during WWII. There was a shortage of ships to move the Rosewood from Brazil to the United States. Rosewood was a “nonessential”. Beech works just as well for handles and knobs. Planes were made with the parts on hand. I suspect that your WWII with Rosewood was made in 1942 before the supply ran out and they had to substitute domestic hardwoods. Does your blade have a date stamp on it?
Also:


Three: I thought it will be historically significant to restore to the original condition with black handle, and a nice piece of conversation. I think it s need to see how world event will influence apparently non related thing.
- Mambrax

Wood working tools were related to the war effort. Planes and spoke shaves were “essential”. The Brits used wood for the frames and structural parts of some of their better and faster airplanes.
chuck

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2190 posts in 941 days


#9 posted 10-21-2015 12:05 PM

If its really rosewood, then I would remove the paint.

Have you dated the plane accurately? I wouldn’t go only by the black paint on the handles.

Go here.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2098 days


#10 posted 10-21-2015 06:26 PM

I’ve run into both kinds. One that I thought was beech turned out to be rosewood. It’s easy to make rosewood look great.

The No 4 in front is rosewood, the one in the back on the right (a No 7, type 18) is beech. Even though I stained it, it came out very light.

[The one on the left in the back was painted orange but also was rosewood (type 13 or so, no 7).]

The No 4, was received looking like this. v

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2098 days


#11 posted 10-21-2015 06:31 PM

You can lightly sand the bottom of both knob and tote on a flat surface covered with sandpaper to reveal if it’s dark or light wood. Make sure both are rosewood.

View Mambrax's profile

Mambrax

139 posts in 952 days


#12 posted 10-21-2015 09:28 PM

Upchuck : very interesting remarks. The point I’m trying to make here is simple: looking past the simple performance to replace any object in it’s historical, cultural and economical contest make it that much more interesting, IMO. Here, with your comment I learn somethings (never though that Britain did import any kind of woodworking tool during the war), which make that little restoration project that much more interesting.
Thanks,

-- Let's do the best we can !

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