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Turning a Circular Saw Into a Table Saw

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Forum topic by wmgworks posted 10-20-2015 03:58 PM 1665 views 0 times favorited 41 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wmgworks

193 posts in 449 days


10-20-2015 03:58 PM

I’ve been spending a lot of time thinking about a multi tool workbench – one that integrates a miter saw, drill press, router table, etc. I have a small shop so making things multipurpose will be a necessity. As for table saw, the ones I can afford most people seem to think are not that good. I’ve seen lots of really cool ideas on making a table saw station out of a circular saw and I find this very appealing. When shopping around, I’ve seen that most really good quality circular saws are less expensive than decent table saws. I would think a lot of the extra money of a really good table saw goes into the table itself, the fence, the miter gauge and other stuff. A lot of that can be made by hand as well. If I turned a pretty good circular saw into a table saw, what would I be missing out on?

Thanks!

-- Butchering wood since 2015


41 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3553 posts in 1232 days


#1 posted 10-20-2015 04:02 PM

Not much other than you will be limited to the 7-1/4” blade instead of 10”. 10” miter saw mayne another option. In the early 80’s Sears used to sell the table for circular use. I used mine for several years and nothing else making musical instruments.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3686 posts in 1730 days


#2 posted 10-20-2015 04:11 PM

I had one of those Sears tables. It worked decently on small stuff. Your limited by the lack of torque. A circular saw getting it’s cutting power by it’s speed. There’s really no torque. Like I said it worked ok on smaller stuff. I’m much happier with my Delta X5 nowadays.

View wmgworks's profile

wmgworks

193 posts in 449 days


#3 posted 10-20-2015 04:29 PM



Your limited by the lack of torque. A circular saw getting it s cutting power by it s speed. There s really no torque. Like I said it worked ok on smaller stuff. I m much happier with my Delta X5 nowadays.

- BurlyBob


Ok educate me a bit. How does torque factor into making a cut? Does that mean the less torque you have the harder it is to cut certain materials?

-- Butchering wood since 2015

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4226 posts in 1663 days


#4 posted 10-20-2015 04:33 PM

How about a circular saw in a box…


(More info here: http://www.owwm.org/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=161452 )

Cheers,
Brad

PS: There is no reason you cant find a nice used cabinet saw for the price of a used C-man contractor saw… you just need to be patient and persistent.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View wmgworks's profile

wmgworks

193 posts in 449 days


#5 posted 10-20-2015 04:37 PM

^^^^^ That’s really cool! Thanks for sharing it

-- Butchering wood since 2015

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johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1637 days


#6 posted 10-20-2015 04:40 PM

Torque is what in necessary to get something started and to maintain its speed under load. Horsepower will maintain a speed unloaded but drop off rapidly under load.
You are right a lot of the money in a table saw goes into the table, the fence, the miter. Money also goes into the motor and drive system the trunion that holds the blade to the table and allows for different depth on the blade and different angles accurately. Accuracy is something you will struggle with when you try to mount a circular saw on a table.
Even the jobsite saws are better for use as a table saw than trying to adapt a circular saw to a table.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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wmgworks

193 posts in 449 days


#7 posted 10-20-2015 05:08 PM

I should also mention a major limiting factor in my shop and that is power. I live ina townhouse complex where 2-3 of us share a single 20 amp 120v circuit between our garages (since they are on house power). I’ve peeked into my neighbor’s garages and none of them are running anything other than their garage door openers. So I will get the entire 20 amps to myself most of the time. Most of the tablesaws I have been looking at don’t go over 15 amps. Do the higher torque saws require more amps anyway?

-- Butchering wood since 2015

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2194 posts in 945 days


#8 posted 10-20-2015 05:28 PM

Have you checked Mattias Wandel’s video on youtube?

I actually started out ww’ing by screwing a circ saw to a piece of plywood.
Looking back compared to what I have now it was pathetic, but it cut wood fairly accurately.

If I may suggest the ideal ww’ing method of a very small shop person is hand tools.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 1951 days


#9 posted 10-20-2015 06:25 PM

WTH?

California has some of the toughest rules for construction in the book.

How would someone reset a circuit breaker if it tripped?

Who pays for the electricity used?

Some of the bigger circular saws draw as many amps as a contractor table saw….

Just some things to think about.

“I should also mention a major limiting factor in my shop and that is power. I live ina townhouse complex where 2-3 of us share a single 20 amp 120v circuit between our garages (since they are on house power). I’ve peeked into my neighbor’s garages and none of them are running anything other than their garage door openers. So I will get the entire 20 amps to myself most of the time. Most of the tablesaws I have been looking at don’t go over 15 amps. Do the higher torque saws require more amps anyway?”

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View wmgworks's profile

wmgworks

193 posts in 449 days


#10 posted 10-20-2015 07:17 PM



Have you checked Mattias Wandel s video on youtube?

I actually started out ww ing by screwing a circ saw to a piece of plywood.
Looking back compared to what I have now it was pathetic, but it cut wood fairly accurately.

If I may suggest the ideal ww ing method of a very small shop person is hand tools.

- rwe2156

I have seen his videos and that build is amazing! It inspired me to do more research on turning hand tools into stationary ones.

I did woodworking 20+ years ago when I was still in high school. And while I remember a lot of it, there are a lot of things I have forgotten (probably for the better). And I don’t plan on making lots of the same thing at the same time. Mostly one off smallish projects. So, to me, converted hand power tools may be good enough for now, know what I mean?

Hand tools are something I have thought quite a bit about. I’m sure I will build up a collection over time and may even use them more than power tools at some point. But not yet

-- Butchering wood since 2015

View wmgworks's profile

wmgworks

193 posts in 449 days


#11 posted 10-20-2015 07:23 PM



How would someone reset a circuit breaker if it tripped?

Who pays for the electricity used?

Some of the bigger circular saws draw as many amps as a contractor table saw….

Just some things to think about.

- Dallas

The HOA pays for the house power (garages, outside lights, etc) so they figure that’s all we need for a garage. And for 99% of the people here that’s true. I just have to be difficult.

If the breaker trips, most people call one of a couple people on the HOA board. But, they’ve told me in the past to just go in the box when I had a problem one time. So, if I flip it I can fix it.

-- Butchering wood since 2015

View wmgworks's profile

wmgworks

193 posts in 449 days


#12 posted 10-20-2015 07:25 PM

Have you checked Mattias Wandel s video on youtube?

I actually started out ww ing by screwing a circ saw to a piece of plywood.
Looking back compared to what I have now it was pathetic, but it cut wood fairly accurately.

If I may suggest the ideal ww ing method of a very small shop person is hand tools.

- rwe2156

I have seen his videos and that build is amazing! It inspired me to do more research on turning hand tools into stationary ones.

I did woodworking 20+ years ago when I was still in high school. And while I remember a lot of it, there are a lot of things I have forgotten (probably for the better). And I don t plan on making lots of the same thing at the same time. Mostly one off smallish projects. So, to me, converted hand power tools may be good enough for now, know what I mean?

Hand tools are something I have thought quite a bit about. Because of he power issue AND because I love traditional techniques. I don’t plan on having more than one tool on at a time. But turing on the saw with the shop vac on may trip a breaker. I don’t know yet. If that happens I will HAVE to switch to hand tools. I’m sure I will build up a collection over time anyway. But not yet

- wmgworks

-- Butchering wood since 2015

View wmgworks's profile

wmgworks

193 posts in 449 days


#13 posted 10-20-2015 07:26 PM

Have you checked Mattias Wandel s video on youtube?

I actually started out ww ing by screwing a circ saw to a piece of plywood.
Looking back compared to what I have now it was pathetic, but it cut wood fairly accurately.

If I may suggest the ideal ww ing method of a very small shop person is hand tools.

- rwe2156

I have seen his videos and that build is amazing! It inspired me to do more research on turning hand tools into stationary ones.

I did woodworking 20+ years ago when I was still in high school. And while I remember a lot of it, there are a lot of things I have forgotten (probably for the better). And I don t plan on making lots of the same thing at the same time. Mostly one off smallish projects. So, to me, converted hand power tools may be good enough for now, know what I mean?

Hand tools are something I have thought quite a bit about. Because of he power issue AND because I love traditional techniques. I don t plan on having more than one tool on at a time. But turning on the saw with the shop vac on may trip a breaker. I don t know yet. If that happens I will HAVE to switch to hand tools. I m sure I will build up a collection over time anyway. But not yet

-- Butchering wood since 2015

View bearkatwood's profile

bearkatwood

1205 posts in 476 days


#14 posted 10-21-2015 12:58 AM

I started out with a jig saw that I screwed upside down to a board and a chop saw. I wish I had not the phobia of hand tools that I did back then or I would have started down the handtool path much sooner. My learning has taught me how to use power tools to their best advantage, but sometimes it is best to unplug. I love that saw in a box, if you could attach it to a workmate it would make a great jobsite/ remodel tool.

-- Brian Noel

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7172 posts in 2262 days


#15 posted 10-21-2015 01:13 AM

Get a ShopSmith. The best thing going for a small shop.
Check out this blog. http://lumberjocks.com/shipwright/blog/series/4678

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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