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Forum topic by Cashew posted 10-20-2015 01:58 AM 628 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Cashew

5 posts in 417 days


10-20-2015 01:58 AM

I’m trying to ID the following wood, I think its a form of Ash. Have never worked this wood before, but lost a section of he tree during a large wind. I’m afraid I will have to trim some branches before more fall and risk hitting the “Tiki Room”.

I have a fair amount dead and wonder if its worth turning or cut it for burning. Need to fill up the log rack to make the wife happy for winter nights.

Thanks in advance,
Cashew


13 replies so far

View Alster's profile

Alster

99 posts in 2681 days


#1 posted 10-20-2015 02:03 AM

Looks like honey locust to me.

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firefighterontheside

13520 posts in 1323 days


#2 posted 10-20-2015 02:15 AM

I thought the same…...leaves look like locust.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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IHRedRules

92 posts in 943 days


#3 posted 10-20-2015 02:16 AM

I second the honey locust. It sure isn’t ash of any Michigan type.

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

486 posts in 1087 days


#4 posted 10-20-2015 03:20 AM

Walnut also has compound leaves like that. The tree shape is certainly consistent with walnut. Does the tree have thorns at all? If so…honey locust. If not, I’d say walnut.

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 988 days


#5 posted 10-20-2015 03:32 AM

I would say it doesn’t look like an ash tree to me. Ash trees have opposing branches. Plus, there are too many leaves on each stem.

The leaves don’t seem to be the right shape for walnut. One of the locusts would be a good guess.

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BurlyBob

3695 posts in 1732 days


#6 posted 10-20-2015 04:13 AM

I agree with locust.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1943 days


#7 posted 10-20-2015 11:52 AM

Thornless honey locust. A horticultural variety bred to be planted in city landscapes. Fruit should be a pod. Look again at the leaves and you will see that some are twice divided. This is called bi-pinnate compound. A mix of once divided (pinnate) and twice dividdd (bi-pinnate) is a characteristic of honeylocust. The wood is coarse grained and very beautiful.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2410 posts in 1981 days


#8 posted 10-20-2015 12:08 PM

Here’s a picture of Honey Locust leaves from Iowa State Forestry Division website. Looks the same to me.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View Cashew's profile

Cashew

5 posts in 417 days


#9 posted 10-20-2015 03:24 PM

No thorns, so I’ll take Honey Locust for 100 points. Thanks to all, I really appreciate it. I’ll cut up and save for turning. Bought the house about 10 years ago, fully landscaped and very nice. I’m not a landscaperand my thumbs are not green enough, have lost 2 pines so far, and another unidentified ornamental that was gorgeous it has not yet fallen and have not cut any pieces yet. I’m hoping that one has as pretty inside as the color show it put on each year. I trimmed back our bushes and was surprised how nice they were inside. I do need to trim back more and can see some pen blanks getting made as well.

I’ve cut some blanks for drying, but my PID I got might have been too cheap to setup properly. I might get a better one to add to my light bulb cabinet kiln. Need to get workshop cleaned up and some projects off the bench. Each day seems like I’m 2 more days behind. That first photo I didn’t add, wish that planner was mine and the shop it’s in.
Well wishes to all,
Cashew

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 988 days


#10 posted 10-22-2015 08:49 PM


Thornless honey locust. A horticultural variety bred to be planted in city landscapes. Fruit should be a pod. Look again at the leaves and you will see that some are twice divided. This is called bi-pinnate compound. A mix of once divided (pinnate) and twice dividdd (bi-pinnate) is a characteristic of honeylocust. The wood is coarse grained and very beautiful.

- Danny

Danny, I assume a leaf can still be pinnate or bi-pinnate even if the leaflets or branches are not opposing, but staggered ?

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

486 posts in 1087 days


#11 posted 10-22-2015 09:06 PM

I see the double compound nature of the leaves now. I think that makes walnut unlikely. Another tree that can be double compound is the Kentucky Coffee Tree.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1943 days


#12 posted 10-23-2015 12:58 AM

Yonak,

I think that I understand your question, and the answer is yes. Some bi-pinnate compound leaves are alternating on the branch, versus opposing.

On this excellent tree ID website, the pic on the left is a bi-pinnate compound leaf and the pic of the leaf with thorns on the right is pinnate compound. All on the same tree.

http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID=30

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 988 days


#13 posted 10-23-2015 01:08 AM

Danny, thank you for that pictorial explanation. I understand now. I also understand why I don’t see any of those trees around where I live.

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