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Cutting window sills on table saw

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Forum topic by ChrisBarrett posted 10-19-2015 08:26 PM 1007 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ChrisBarrett

99 posts in 523 days


10-19-2015 08:26 PM

So I replaced a window sill yesterday, I cut the outside edge to 14 degrees and needed to match the inside cut to the same angle on those little dog legs that sit outside of the siding. One of those cuts is possible, one is not. It would require feeding the lumber backwards to the table saw.

Is there any way of making this cut besides by hand or jigsaw?


10 replies so far

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ChrisBarrett

99 posts in 523 days


#1 posted 10-19-2015 09:17 PM

As a general idea, how do you, or can you, cut angles on a table saw where you need the blade to tilt in the other direction?

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Kazooman

628 posts in 1418 days


#2 posted 10-19-2015 09:43 PM

Sorry, Chris, I just can’t seem to wrap my brain around just what you are asking. I assume that you are referring to a long sill piece and that there are angle cuts along the edges to match the desired slope of the piece.

Can you post a drawing or picture of what the end of the piece you are trying to make?

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Ghidrah

667 posts in 687 days


#3 posted 10-20-2015 01:31 AM

I’m missing it too. The length of the sill isn’t relevant, I cut the inner and outer angles 1st, then if the interior part of the sill is level instead of at an angle I cut the exterior bevel to shed water to the drip. I then make the 2 int/ext cuts for frame and sill and 1 ear with a right hand circ then for the 2nd ear I use my left hand circ. When done I finish the cuts with a hand saw to prevent over cutting

-- I meant to do that!

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bondogaposis

4034 posts in 1816 days


#4 posted 10-20-2015 01:41 AM

This is what is really handy about using hand saws, if you can draw the line on wood then you can cut it. No complicated set ups.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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ChrisBarrett

99 posts in 523 days


#5 posted 10-20-2015 03:04 AM

Ghidrah answered I believe, using a right hand circ for one ear and left hand circ for the other. I did end up using a rip hand saw for the “other” ear notch that couldn’t be done on the table saw.

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jerryminer

528 posts in 907 days


#6 posted 10-20-2015 08:16 AM



.... couldn t be done on the table saw. – ChrisBarrett

These cuts actually CAN be done on the table saw. One end is straight-forward—-you feed in to your line and stop. At the other end, you set the board on the saw with the blade retracted, turn on the saw, and raise the blade up into the board, feeding through as needed.

I raise the blade to the intended final height with the saw OFF and make a mark on the fence where the leading edge of the blade lines up with the top of the board, then retract the blade, set the fence, line the board up with the mark on the fence, and go.

No harm in using a hand saw or jigsaw, though. Those work too.

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ChrisBarrett

99 posts in 523 days


#7 posted 10-20-2015 01:30 PM

Jerry, so would there be a risk of the board kicking back using that method?

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Ghidrah

667 posts in 687 days


#8 posted 10-21-2015 03:33 AM

Chris Barrett,

I might think a couple 4 times before I tried that, it can be done but it is dangerous like climb cutting with a router the blade does track but you’d need to clamp the item in place to prevent it from rising with the blade and or taking off and or wrecking the material. Heck if you’re adamant using the TS for the entire process you could easily rip the length of the sill for the ear angle then glue the 2 pieces back together once the frames side cuts were made.
If it was me and I didn’t want to own a lefty, I’d use a hand saw for the odd cut, it’s so much harder to wreck the material, yourself. Lefties have come in handy for me over the yrs for the odd cuts, (the only reason I ever had for using worm drives). Consider one of the multi tools for added dimension in your woodworking

-- I meant to do that!

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jerryminer

528 posts in 907 days


#9 posted 10-21-2015 06:26 AM


Jerry, so would there be a risk of the board kicking back using that method?

- ChrisBarrett

I suppose there is always SOME risk of kickback, but the risk here is extremely slight, IMHO. Typically, the board itself has substantial weight and is resting almost entirely on the outfeed support (outfeed support is very important here—-I always use a run-out table). One could clamp a stop to the fence to prevent kickback, but I typically place one hand on the work—or on a push-stick, if there isn’t safe room for a hand, while the other hand raises the blade.

I use this same technique for other “plunge cuts” on the table saw—interior cuts for plywood cutouts, etc.

To Ghidrah’s point about the similarity to climb-cutting with a router: This (climb-cutting) can also be done safely, but it does take some thought and care. I don’t advise using this—or any other—technique to anyone who feels uncomfortable about it. If you’re more comfortable with a left-handed circ. saw, or a hand saw, or a jig saw, by all means use those methods. I’m just responding to the “can’t be done on the table saw” concept.

For me, plunge-cutting with a table saw is very useful in a lot of situations, and—-again, for ME, it is simpler and quicker, since I’m already standing there at the table saw, to make the cut then and there.

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ChrisBarrett

99 posts in 523 days


#10 posted 10-21-2015 01:41 PM

Next sill I do I’ll give that method a try. If it doesn’t work out I’ll use my left hand circ saw. Thanks for all the tips guys! I have at least 3 more sills that are completely rotted out.

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