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Forum topic by daddywoofdawg posted 10-19-2015 05:44 PM 692 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1035 days


10-19-2015 05:44 PM

I’m in a wheelchair and haven’t got a tablesaw because it to me doesn’t seem safe to use at a sitting height.My question to other chair users,do you use a tablesaw?if so what do you do to make it safe, as a standing person safe?


7 replies so far

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fivecodys

581 posts in 1096 days


#1 posted 10-19-2015 06:02 PM

I remembered seeing this. Hope it’s helpful.

http://blog.woodcraft.com/2012/01/the-wheelchair-woodworker-shop/

-- Chem, Central California

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Brinth

68 posts in 383 days


#2 posted 11-19-2015 10:29 PM

I am a wheelchair user (after a combat wound) and i use a table saw and a lot of different tools.

I think it is safe enough. I have not changed so mutch else than having it on Wheels so i can push it around. And my table saw weight 185 kg
The only thing i always do is to have a crosscut sled on. That Means a piece of Wood between me and the Wood i cut so it can grip the Wood. It is sitting in my sliding table. The handle of the sliding table stops it from running backwards.
If i am afraid of pieces of Wood flying back i just use a wooden board to put on top on the saw, crosscut sled and above the sawblade to catch the small pieces.

I am also using bandsaw, and with iron: welding, cutting torch and mutch more
As a wonded soldier i even use all kind of wepons except hangranades

I even climp on ladders and i can not use my leegs (i have a compleete T11)

-- Brinth, Denmark - "nothing is impossible and everything goes; if you have the will (and the time) to do it"

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dhazelton

2322 posts in 1757 days


#3 posted 11-19-2015 11:28 PM

My first thought is what Brinth said – a kickback when your face is at table height could kill you. How about lowering the saw?

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daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1035 days


#4 posted 11-19-2015 11:32 PM

Brinth: do you have any photos of the saw set-up? “The only thing i always do is to have a crosscut sled on. That Means a piece of Wood between me and the Wood i cut so it can grip the Wood. It is sitting in my sliding table. The handle of the sliding table stops it from running backwards.
If i am afraid of pieces of Wood flying back i just use a wooden board to put on top on the saw, crosscut sled and above the saw blade to catch the small pieces.”

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CueballRosendaul

484 posts in 1600 days


#5 posted 11-22-2015 04:24 AM

Sawstop is coming out with a small contractor job site saw very soon which might have enough safety features and easy to make lower to the floor or roll-under configuration. The best thing that comes to mind though is what the guys on Fine Woodworking’s podcast recently said about band saws. With a properly tuned band saw, you can do all the major tasks of a table saw. You run into a throat depth limitation, but how often are you using a board over 14” wide anyway. A typical band saw on a steel stand would be easy to chop down to accessible height too.

After learning proper setup from Snodgrass ( the guy who cuts the reindeer at wood shows ), my band saw is pretty amazing even though it’s a 50 year old Delta. With a fence, feather boards, miter slot, good blades and guides you’ll be in business. Invest in a benchtop jointer or a nice bench plane to clean up the edges.

And don’t be afraid to reach out tot the manufacturers representatives for help and advice. They may have done some customizations for other woodworkers in the past.

-- Matt CueBall Rosendaul. I don't think I've ever had a cup of coffee that didn't have cat hair or sawdust in it.

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Brinth

68 posts in 383 days


#6 posted 11-22-2015 08:27 PM

My setup is not so special.
It is a cross-cut like everybody else is using (the homemade kind). Just a Little bigger than normal. I just made it so big i can put a jig on for making wooden bowls, dowels, and so on on my table saw.

One problem with a band saw and a wheelchair is that Wood pieces so big that you have to move is a problem. you use both arms in steering the Wood pieces so you can not drive around. There a big table saw is mutch better.
Another problem with a band saw is that the chair always have to be braked or else you push your selv back – and if it is to heavy you tilt backwards. The tilting problem can be solved with just have the chair with the side to the machine.

I dont have any photos right now but i can take some tomorro. I have “homework” in my workshop the hole day.

-- Brinth, Denmark - "nothing is impossible and everything goes; if you have the will (and the time) to do it"

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daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1035 days


#7 posted 11-23-2015 01:25 AM

ya I have the same problem,need to lower mine thought it was a good height but seems sometimes it a shoulder height.
I designing a wheelchair friendly “jig”that would work on a table saw that would be safe for chair users.
And starting a wheelchair woodworker FB group, and blog.The sites will be called Able woodworkers.I’ll post when they are up.

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