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Forum topic by myxology posted 10-19-2015 01:09 PM 701 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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myxology

43 posts in 702 days


10-19-2015 01:09 PM

Topic tags/keywords: dust collection garage

I’m getting ready to re-do the dust collection in my garage. I have a Harbor Freight dust collector that I’m going to move outside, build a little “lean to” style shed around it, and run the ducting into the shop through a vent that is already in the wall. Do I need to add anything else to it, like a cyclone or anything like that? I figure now that its outside I don’t need to worry about it.

I’ve seen conversations about noise with the neighbors (and I do have a neighbor’s house really close to that wall) but my neighbors are very cool and I’m hoping the “shed” will keep the noise down. I’m a little concerned about very fine dust filling up in the shed. Should I be? I was thinking maybe I’d better ventilate the shed a little too. Nobody will ever be “in” the shed, but I was thinking fire hazard for some reason.

I’d love to hear some thoughts on this. I’m not a professional at all. This is a hobby and I don’t have thousands of dollars to spend on this. This just seemed like a better option than having the DC unit take up space in my garage and that it would also reduce the fine dust in the garage.

Thanks!


7 replies so far

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3125 days


#1 posted 10-19-2015 01:17 PM

I don’t know what part of the country you are in, but if the air in your shop is conditioned (heated/cooled), venting outside without make-up air could be a problem.

I wouldn’t just vent into your shed without a cyclone or separator to catch the bulk of the dust & chips. It could be a real mess to clean out and, as you point out, a potential fire hazard (the bin on my DC filled up this weekend and I was out of bags, so I emptied it into the fire pit and lit a match. 5 hours later, it was still smoldering and smoking like crazy).

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 638 days


#2 posted 10-19-2015 01:21 PM

I am planning on doing the same thing.

Things I am considering:
1. Heat / Cooling lost by having conditioned air pass outside. I plan to insulate the addition.
2. Are you planning to return the air back into your shop? I plan to use a high MERV filter to allow air to return to my shop. If necessary I will add a couple of small box fans (6” fans from computer equipment) to move the air through the filter and back into my shop.
3. Use a Oneida Super Dust Deputy to remove as much as possible prior to the air passing through the HP dust collection.
4. I have already added a Wynn Nano canister filter in place of the upper bag on my HF dust collector.
5. I will keep the remote on/off control inside the shop.

I hope this helps, and if you think of anything else please let me know.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2152 days


#3 posted 10-19-2015 01:28 PM

I have my dust collector in the garage adjacent to my shop and have never felt like I was losing an appreciable amount of heated air. If you have a planer, I would definitely build a chip separator.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8242 posts in 2890 days


#4 posted 10-19-2015 01:46 PM

I took the filters off my HF DC and vented it straight out side. With a cyclone in line ahead of the DC it’s self, I get minimal dust out the vent. If it were a concern (it’s not, rural area with no neighbors close) I could have vented the dust in to a drum.
As to heated air loss: 24X16 shop with 10’ ceiling and very well insulated. Heated with a 5 plaque flameless Procomm wall mounted unit. The unit has been in use 8 years. The DC was vented outside 5 years ago. There has been no increase in fuel usage over the years and certainly no noticeable infiltration of cold air while using the DC.
One caveat….it seldom gets colder than -5 around here and that’s at night.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View clin's profile

clin

510 posts in 458 days


#5 posted 10-20-2015 12:18 AM

Venting conditioned air outside may be a big deal. While your AC or furnace may keep up and your shop stay comfortable, that’s still a lot of conditioned air to be blowing outside.

For example, if you we moving 1,000 CFM of air, a shop the size that Gene stated (24×16 x 10) has about 3,800 cu. ft of volume. At 1,000 CFM all of the air in that space would be replaced in 3.8 minutes. I’ll defer to others actual experience, but it’s hard for me to believe you wound’t notice that. Of course, if your dust collector is only on while actually making cuts, than I can see how it might not be an issue.

However, regardless of lost conditioned air, you still need to replace the air. So you will need some way for new air to enter the space. Keep in mind that if replacement air is restricted from getting into the shop, this is no different than any other restriction in the dust collection.

Similarly, with the DC located outside in a shed, you still must ventilate that shed. All the air being sucked into the DC has to go somewhere. If the air can’t get out of the shed, that is a restriction no different than plugging the hose. So you want the exhaust air to be able to exit the shed to the outside with minimal restriction.

I’m new to woodworking and DC, but am an engineer with experience with airflow. So take any of this with that in mind. I would also put a cyclone on the system. If venting to outside I would NOT add any filtering. The cyclones do an amazing job and based on the reading I’ve done, the fine dust outside dissipates and degrades pretty fast outside. So for a hobbyist, I think the environmental impact is essentially nonexistent.

Noise could be any issue. If you run the exhaust vent through a baffle, this will cut the noise quite a bit. You’d be surprised how much noise reduction you can get just running a short length of foam lined duct (1 foot). Note: Foam is on the inside. A longer duct is better. For your shed, perhaps consider running the exhaust vent near the top, down along the side, then out the bottom (or vice versa). Whatever works best.

If it were me, I’d build the shed as easy as possible and see how much of a noise problem you have. Then modify if need. And as always, if on good terms with your neighbors, address the issue before you do it. That way when you do, they’ll know what that new noise is. If they sort of feel they’ve be asked for input already, they’ll be much less likely to be annoyed by it.

-- Clin

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8242 posts in 2890 days


#6 posted 10-20-2015 06:16 PM

For example, if you we moving 1,000 CFM of air, a shop the size that Gene stated (24×16×10) has about 3,800 cu. ft of volume. At 1,000 CFM all of the air in that space would be replaced in 3.8 minutes. I’ll defer to others actual experience, but it’s hard for me to believe you wound’t notice that. Of course, if your dust collector is only on while actually making cuts, than I can see how it might not be an issue.

Clin, I agree. Mine only runs when the particular tool is being used.
I’m a hobbyist and retired. 8 hr. shop days are the norm, but I’d guess the DC is only running maybe 2-3 hrs of that.
Dispensing with the bags saves me tons of space and a lot of hassles. For me, it’s worth the negligible heat loss. With a 35 gal. metal can as my separator receptacle, I may not lose as much heat as you’d think.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View myxology's profile

myxology

43 posts in 702 days


#7 posted 11-16-2015 11:56 PM

Gentlemen, thanks for the feedback. It looks like I may want to make a cyclone or a thein baffle, then? I live in Northern California, so the weather is almost never a factor. Most of the time I leave my garage door open while I’m working, especially in the summer. It does get cold enough for a heater in there, so I’ll have to address that at some point, I guess. If I were to put in a small air conditioner I could always partially open my garage door for the makeup air.

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