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Forum topic by WayneC posted 10-21-2007 03:36 AM 958 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WayneC

12292 posts in 2785 days


10-21-2007 03:36 AM

Topic tags/keywords: video editing camera

I broke down and purchased a video camera. What do I need software wise to be able to edit and process video for posting on the site? All of my computers are running Microsoft operating systems.

I assume I will also need a hosting site such as you tube. Any suggestions or recommendations?

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov


17 replies so far

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2849 days


#1 posted 10-21-2007 12:02 PM

here’s the Wood Whisperer’s tutorial re: posting. As to editing, I ‘ll have to leave that up to a PC user.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

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Dekker

147 posts in 2569 days


#2 posted 10-21-2007 01:05 PM

If you can get your hands on it, Adobe Premiere is great. If you have WindowsXP or Vista, I believe there is basic video editing software included with the operating system – Start – All Programs – Accessories – Windows Movie Maker (I have never used it so I can not comment). Nero's Ultra is another option.

-- Dekker - http://www.WoodworkDetails.com/

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12292 posts in 2785 days


#3 posted 10-21-2007 02:30 PM

Thanks. Looks like Nero is probaby the best one to experiment with. At least from an affordability perspective.

Deb, thanks for the posting link.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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furnitologist

198 posts in 2701 days


#4 posted 10-21-2007 09:54 PM

Hi Wayne:

I work with Apple. Windows user speak of Premiere as Dekker mentions and they do have a Premier elements I believe just like PhotoShop elements.

There are numerous video hosting sites, Vimeo, Blip, You Tube, a quick google will provide many options. They key to selecting a hosting site is how long your playtime is for a video you’ve produced. Also, how easy it is to distribute your video from your selected host. David is playing with this now. He could probably provide more depth there than I.

Although the pictures are nice, audio is important and might be worth an extra purchace of a mic. Now a way around that would be to shoot your video, capture it to your computer, then do a voice over into your camera while watching your edited version. Then capture your new audio and layer it into your timeline. Sometimes it looks funky but over time you’ll get good at shooting, knowing you will voice over. Also don’t forget that you’ll use a purchased mic for your personal stuff and people will love watching home video with good audio.

As for your lighting, start out with those contractor lamps from home depot and bounce them off the ceiling, theses camera do a very good job of finding the right exposure. Also get familiar with white balancing your camera, and stay with your settings. Make white balance a priority.

The other issue is to find a quality level that you define. Video can get very time consuming. One disadvantage that I have found by doing a video blog is that my wife (Gigi) and I don’t experiment shooting any longer. I think that is half the fun of having a video camera, another creative outlet. We are rethinking this now, as Gigi likes…no loves shooting video, but is finding the blog style we are on; to be restrictive for her. I believe your video comes out better if you have somebody else shooting, in her case, shooting video is her outlet as woodworking is to us LJ’s. I guess my point here is always think to experiment and have fun with it.

Just keep throwing out your questions….............Neil

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mot

4911 posts in 2724 days


#5 posted 10-22-2007 02:37 AM

Wayne, get Pinnacle Studio. I’ve used them all, it’s easy, intuitive and will provide the best bang for the buck. The others are no slouch, but what are you trying to do? Produce Brittany Spears videos, or woodworking videos?

Pinnacle Software

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Woodminer's profile

Woodminer

69 posts in 2625 days


#6 posted 10-22-2007 06:07 AM

One plea: Please be sure to have enough volume on your recordings. Much better to be so loud that we have to turn it down, than to have everything turned up to the max and still not be able to hear or make out words.

One suggestion: Set things up so that you can look at a monitor while you record. This is vital if you’re trying to do this by yourself. I did some segments for someone on lathe tools. Drew a square on a board and made sure that everything was in the square. It worked, but could have been better had I been able to see what I was actually presenting. I agree with Neil about better if someone else is shooting, so long as that someone is following YOUR script and not being “artsy-fartsy” about the video. Hope that won’t offend anyone.

One great bit of video recording is Jimmy Clewes first trilogy of DVDs. The camera work is stellar. Actually much better than in trilogy number two, IMO. One of the things on the first set is a little outtake from the videographer who actually went to Jimmy’s classes to see what it is that turners want and/or need to learn. As a result, he came away with a real understanding of what would make those videos powerful teaching tools. It worked. If you’ve not seen them, find a way to watch them. The camera gets up close and personal to show tool technique in a way that I’ve not seen in anyone else’s videos.

Neil will tell you to shoot what’s important and focus on that, but to make sure it’s actually IN THE PICTURE! We don’t need to see the back of your head or the backs of your hands in a close up. What are you making and how are you doing it? What do I need to do to make my stuff good, too??

Hope it helps.

-- Dean, Missouri

View Tony's profile

Tony

978 posts in 2718 days


#7 posted 10-22-2007 12:23 PM

Wayne – DITTO. I was about to ask the same question about the software – my wife just purchased a new video camera which I may or may not be allowed to use.

we have just used it on holiday, I have got to somehow reduce the image quality (size of file) for use on the web the standard 720*576 vieo produces too big a file 1 min 30 sec = 75MB.

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2724 days


#8 posted 10-22-2007 03:35 PM

Tony, the online video hosting sites, like blip.tv, youtube.com, jumpcut.com and several others convert the video to a Flash format that greatly reduces it’s size. You can keep it in relatively high resolution and then upload it. Users will get a Flash version that will be a somewhat attenuated resolution to your original….but remember with conversions, garbage in = garbage out. Upload the best you can get away with.

Cheers!

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12292 posts in 2785 days


#9 posted 10-23-2007 06:58 AM

Wow. Thanks everyone for the great tips.

I will get the Pinnacle Software as suggested. Probably next week along with a Network Storage device. I will look into microphones. I saw some at Frys that were over a hundred dollars (blue tooth). Hopefully there are some less expensive options available.

Tony, you will have to work on your wife.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View SteveRussell's profile

SteveRussell

101 posts in 2648 days


#10 posted 10-25-2007 05:44 PM

Hello Wayne,

I’ve been producing woodturning educational DVD videos for the last few years and although my equipment is all high-end professional stuff (we have about $25,000.00 invested thus far in equipment and software), I have used other editing suites and equipment as well. You will find that video editing is a sink-hole for your money. :-o It swallows up large chunks of change and it’s a hungry beast… It’s more challenging to edit on a Windows platform, but it can be done.

Pinnacle is good software, but I would take a look at Adobe’s Creative Suite 3 as well. Dreamweaver and Flash are great programs, if you’re just getting up to speed with video. Whatever you get, try to get some DVD instructional programs that will walk you through the screen shots as you learn. Video editing can be challenging, but if you take it one step at a time, it’s a piece of cake. If you can’t find any instructional software, email me and I will give you a good website that sells this type of material.

We shoot with a Sony DV camera and run dual Windows and Apple NLE workstations (Non-Linear Editing) with a G5 DP Mac running Final Cut Pro and a Windows XP workstation running Adobe Creative Suite 3. Adobe’s CS3 cost about $1,500.00 for the whole suite, but you don’t need many of the programs that it includes. Final Cut Pro is also $1,200.00 – $1,500.00+, but it also includes some programs you don’t really need. You can purchase just the program you want from Adobe, so the cost will be a lot less than the suite if you just need one program.

I agree on the idea of using a supplemental monitor when recording if possible. We use two Sony studio monitors, one in the film studio and one in the editing room. You will also need some good sticks (tripod) for your camera. You might be able to use and old camera tripod for this, if you have one. Also think about lights. Halogens are great, but they get really hot. The latest units use daylight (color corrected) fluorescents, in light boxes… Sweet.

Sound is another factor… While wireless setups are nice, you don’t really need them. You can get a great clip on wired mic for about $100.00 if you camera has the correct XLR input. The list goes on and on… You can see how I have so much invested, and we’re just small fry. You can also get pretty good results on the cheap, but you have to be willing to scrounge around and make do with more complicated setups. You might consider purchasing some used equipment as well. That’s a good way to get your feet wet without breaking the bank.

After you get all of your equipment, you need to start learning how to use the camera. Forget about auto-focusing… It will not work well if you’re moving around in a video demo. You have to learn how to manually focus. Also, you need to learn about zebras (for exposure) and push-focus, so your zooms are all in focus. We recently got a remote Lanc controller that’s really sweet and allows metered zooms, along with on/off and focus. You may also find that you have to set your camera exposure manually. Auto exposure does not work in many situations. We set everything manually. Gee… I hope I did not scare you off… :-o

If you end up doing lots of video (it can be addicting), consider getting an editing deck. I use a Sony model ($1,800.00) that was some of the best money I’ve ever spent. If you use your camera to upload video into your computer, it causes wear on the camera internals. That’s not a problem for the occasional videos, but if you do lots of it, you can end up wearing out critical components. That’s where a deck comes in… You take the DV cassette out of the camera and load it into the deck. No extra wear and tear on the camera and you upload the video from the deck. Decks also allow you to search for scenes via their timecode, which saves you TONS of time.

Also remember that when you’re editing on your computer monitor, you will not be seeing the same image color later on your TV. You will need an NTSC monitor for that, which allows you to edit using TV parameters. Lots to learn, but that’s half the fun of it… :-) If you have any specific questions, please do not hesitate to contact me. Good luck to you and best wishes in all of your videography efforts.

Steve Russell
EWW, WVP, EWWFS
The Woodlands, Texas

-- Better Woodturning and Finishing Through Chemistry... http://www.woodturningvideosplus.com

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12292 posts in 2785 days


#11 posted 10-27-2007 05:30 AM

Wow. Thanks for all of the great advise. I’m just getting started and want to do a few posts for fun. Sounds like there is a lot to learn and like woodworking a lot that can be invested.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 3015 days


#12 posted 10-27-2007 06:43 AM

you’ve got some great advice here… it can be as easy or hard as you want it to be. Too add a bit to what Steve said, it may be a big money hole… it’s also a big time hole too! Having worked on a weekly tv show back in college (not a class, just something a bunch of friends and classmates did in our “spare” time (you know when we should have been studying, sleeping or out getting drunk). Good times.

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View SteveRussell's profile

SteveRussell

101 posts in 2648 days


#13 posted 10-27-2007 11:41 PM

Hello Wayne,

Glad to hear I didn’t scare you away… :-) Video is really a lot of fun and it can be done on the cheap, with some proper setup. We produce and sell DVD videos, so we’re pretty deep into the production and distribution aspects of DV and all that entails… If I can ever help you, please do not hesitate to contact me. Take care and all the best to you and yours!

Steve Russell
EWW, WVP, EWWFS
The Woodlands, Texas

-- Better Woodturning and Finishing Through Chemistry... http://www.woodturningvideosplus.com

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SteveRussell

101 posts in 2648 days


#14 posted 10-27-2007 11:47 PM

Hello Scott,

You are so right… Time seems to disappear (as well as available hard drive space) when editing video. We have a Terabyte of video storage space and we have to really watch it, or we will run out of space on the NLE workstation.

I think that you enter some kind of warp hole when editing video… Seconds in your mind, are actually hours… :-o You think you’ve been at it for a few minutes and you look up and half the day has passed.

Wow, a weekly TV show… Impressive! Sounds like you had your hands full. :-) Take care and all the best to you and yours!

Steve Russell
EWW, WVP, EWWFS
The Woodlands, Texas

-- Better Woodturning and Finishing Through Chemistry... http://www.woodturningvideosplus.com

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12292 posts in 2785 days


#15 posted 10-28-2007 12:18 AM

Thanks Steve. I think I am going to buy a little NAS device and decide on software this week.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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