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Pellet Stove Heat: Anyone have one that's 6" exhaust?

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Forum topic by ForestGrl posted 10-18-2015 03:53 AM 614 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ForestGrl

445 posts in 547 days


10-18-2015 03:53 AM

Topic tags/keywords: pellet stove shop heat

We picked up an older Englander pellet stove last week for the shop, it has 6” outlet on top of the stove, to hook up to 6” stove pipe. The pipe will have to go straight up almost 8’ before it hooks to the box that goes through the ceiling/roof to the “chimney” that’s above roof (metal thing with cap). Does anyone out there have one like that? I understand that pellet stoves don’t draft the way wood stoves do, just hoping it will do OK with such a long run to the roof. Our old pellet stove used 3” or 4” pipe, and there was a blower right next to the exhaust pipe to assist the exhaust.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)


11 replies so far

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1634 days


#1 posted 10-18-2015 11:47 AM

All stoves draft the same way. The draft controls may be in different places but cold air goes in the bottom and hot air goes up the stack. The early pellet stoves were just wood stoves with a modified firebox. The blowers were added to make the pellet stoves burn more efficiently and allowed the use of smaller diameter pipe.

You want to make sure you have the right clearances completely around the stove and chimney.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17143 posts in 2567 days


#2 posted 10-18-2015 12:01 PM

The important thing for draft is that the outside top of the chimney is above the peak of the roof for it to draw good.

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2324 posts in 1758 days


#3 posted 10-18-2015 01:44 PM

With a wood stove a long run of pipe gives you good draft. You also can’t have more than 180 degrees (I THINK!) worth of elbows in the run (including cleanout) but it sounds like you have zero and should be good. I’d go online or contact them for an installation manual. You may be able to use a reducer to use smaller pipe. And whether or not it should be double wall should be determined before you hook it up/

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

3341 posts in 2547 days


#4 posted 10-18-2015 07:41 PM

The pellet stove I am familiar with that had a 6” pipe did not have a damper in the stove, so you had to
put a section of pipe with a damper installed above the stove. If you are not sure whether or not your
stove has a damper the Englander home site has a way to contact them and you might be able to get
an owner’s manual for the stove. As dhazelton suggested, contact them for an installation manual as
well as the owner’s manual. Without this information, you will not be able to operate the stove at
maximum efficiency or safety. The stoves are a great idea and I used one for several years until the
price of pellets went from $90 a ton to over $200 a ton and it became much less expensive and way
easier to heat with natural gas.

-- As ever, Gus-the 77 yr young apprentice carpenter

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

841 posts in 2437 days


#5 posted 10-18-2015 09:59 PM

We have a small “normal” wood stove that uses 6” pipe. We have 11’ ceiling and then another 8’ or 10’ triple wall chimney pipe above that. It seems to draft fine. No elbows in run.

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 547 days


#6 posted 10-19-2015 03:14 AM



All stoves draft the same way. The draft controls may be in different places but cold air goes in the bottom and hot air goes up the stack. The early pellet stoves were just wood stoves with a modified firebox. The blowers were added to make the pellet stoves burn more efficiently and allowed the use of smaller diameter pipe.

You want to make sure you have the right clearances completely around the stove and chimney.

- johnstoneb

Seems the early pellet stoves like this one we just bought were designed so they could be exchanged with a wood stove that used 6” pipe, so I’m hopeful everything will be fine. The pellet stove that we’re junking out was more advanced but looks older; it used 4” pipe. We sunk quite a bit of $$ into the piping for that one! Then a couple months after we got it set up, there was a power surge and “poof” went the control panel (this was probably 7 years ago), and I spent a couple hundred or more paying someone to rig up a work-around, which never worked all that great and was really a PITA. When I recently discovered the auger motor was toast, I started looking around a used stoves and found this one.

Yes, all the clearances are appropriate. It’s helpful that pellet stoves don’t require as much distance as wood stoves, which was the first option we tried eons ago.

This 6-wheel dolly, holding the “new” stove, was a godsend—had never seen one before:

We’re lucky to have a young friend who’s big, strong, and works with motors and other heavy things every day. Hubby, on the right, planned the exchange and lifted the stove out of the truck with his motor lifter. I had cleared lots of room for it to come into the shop for the exchange.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 547 days


#7 posted 10-19-2015 03:18 AM



The important thing for draft is that the outside top of the chimney is above the peak of the roof for it to draw good.

Jim

- Jim Jakosh

Check!

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 547 days


#8 posted 10-19-2015 03:25 AM


The pellet stove I am familiar with that had a 6” pipe did not have a damper in the stove, so you had to
put a section of pipe with a damper installed above the stove. If you are not sure whether or not your
stove has a damper the Englander home site has a way to contact them and you might be able to get
an owner s manual for the stove. As dhazelton suggested, contact them for an installation manual as
well as the owner s manual. Without this information, you will not be able to operate the stove at
maximum efficiency or safety. The stoves are a great idea and I used one for several years until the
price of pellets went from $90 a ton to over $200 a ton and it became much less expensive and way
easier to heat with natural gas.

- Bluepine38

I’ve not seen any pellet stove that had a damper. I do plan to call Englander tomorrow and see if they can tell me what model this stove is, and see if they can give me some help and point me to the manual. Would that natural gas was an option, but I live on an island, and they’ve never figured out a way to pipe gas to us and run the miles of pipe in such a rural area. Propane is the only gas option, and it would probably be more expensive at this point (cost of stove, installation, lease a tank, etc., etc.).

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 547 days


#9 posted 10-19-2015 03:35 AM



We have a small “normal” wood stove that uses 6” pipe. We have 11 ceiling and then another 8 or 10 triple wall chimney pipe above that. It seems to draft fine. No elbows in run.

- hotbyte

That’s very good news! That’s 2-1/2x as many feet as we have. We happen to have about 15’ of 8” pipe languishing under a tarp, I think hubby bought it cheap with the idea to resell, and never did. We can get a coupling that’ll fit between the 6” stove and the 8” pipe. If it doesn’t burn well with that, will have to fork out for 6” pipe. :-(

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View bandit571's profile (online now)

bandit571

14556 posts in 2145 days


#10 posted 10-19-2015 03:41 AM

Three things I used to burn in my old pellet stove

Wood pellets…..pricey
Cherry Pits…..a lot less pricey
Corn…..cheap, but needs to be DRY as a popcorn far…...

Out in the woodshop on North Main street ( a metal, 2-1/2 car garage) I used a “Barrel stove”. I got a kit of parts, the front door, the legs, a grate, and a stove pipe collar. Sabre sawed an old 55 gal steel drum to fit the parts. Barrel laid on it’s side. Stove pipe went straight up through the roof. Burned about anything available in the stove…shop never had any mistakes….they went right into the stove. Now and then, pipe needed to be cleaned out….handful of blank rifle rounds tossed into the back under the stove pipe opening…...BOOM all the built up soot went right up and out the top….Had to go up and place the spark-catcher back onto the pipe.

On that pellet stove for the house at that time….we went from a HUGE 1964 Williams fuel oil forced air monster to the pellet stove….$1000 for the oil for one season..vs…$500 for the pellet stove’s fuel and cost. $350 for the stove $139 for a ton of pellets. Had one elbow to go from the stove and into the chimney’s thimble right behind the stove. Used a concrete like board to sit the stove on.

House I rent nowadays has gas. Shop doesn’t need it’s own heater.

Just my $0.02 worth…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 547 days


#11 posted 10-19-2015 03:42 AM



With a wood stove a long run of pipe gives you good draft. You also can t have more than 180 degrees (I THINK!) worth of elbows in the run (including cleanout) but it sounds like you have zero and should be good. I d go online or contact them for an installation manual. You may be able to use a reducer to use smaller pipe. And whether or not it should be double wall should be determined before you hook it up/

- dhazelton

I’d prefer to use double-wall, don’t like the idea of a single-wall, super-hot pipe in there. :-0 Calling Englander tomorrow!

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

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