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Forum topic by cabinetman posted 01-24-2007 07:55 PM 1188 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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cabinetman

144 posts in 2831 days


01-24-2007 07:55 PM

I read some of these posts and replies that are directed to some type of woodworking that is thought of as “being beyond that persons skills”. That piece your looking at didn’t happen by itself. Someone had to try to do it. There was more than likely a learning curve or mistakes involved in doing something for the first time, but so what. That’s the fun of this craft. There’s no such thing as failure.

What I’m suggesting is that whatever you don’t think you can make, just look at a finished product, or plan a project, and start out on paper with all the basics. Your thinking will include a basic theory of what you will have to do to have it turn out the way you want. It’s all the steps, right from the beginning as to all aspects of the project. This includes material you will need, tools, and a table top or floor to make it. It’s a progressive method that will take you from start to finish, as long as you keep an open mind. Back in the olden days, before the internet and forums, woodworking was a craft that for the most part was self taught and trial and error was the teacher. The fun part is seeing the project come together no matter how involved or how bad it was. My first handcut dovetails looked like a child did them with the toy tools from the plastic toolbox. They got better with practice. It’s taking the final desired project and saying “What do I have to do to make it”. Then getting started gets you going. If you think you don’t have the correct tools, there are a lot of alternate ways of doing procedures.

Don’t sell yourself short in what skills you think you need. Go ahead and try. There is plenty of help here to answer questions or guide you through. Skills will happen.

You will surprise yourself.


7 replies so far

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Dusty

785 posts in 2844 days


#1 posted 01-24-2007 07:58 PM

I couldn’t agree more.

Just do it. try it. Learn from it.

Most of all have fun doing it.

Dusty

-- Dusty

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MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2848 days


#2 posted 01-24-2007 10:08 PM

I thank you for the wrods of wisdom and encouragement. Having just begun my journey into “wanting” to do woodworking I can look back to just last week and see how much I have learned and how many things I have tried for the first time.
I can’t wait to see what I uncover in the NEXT 7 days!!

thank you again for this message

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

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Quentin

47 posts in 2834 days


#3 posted 01-24-2007 10:47 PM

I am guilty of telling myself that I cannot do it, so I never have to and never have to feel failure. What I’m not realizing is that there is no failure, there is only learning.

Thank you for posting this, you have inspired me!

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Dusty

785 posts in 2844 days


#4 posted 01-25-2007 04:30 AM

If you offer your resignation to quiting -it will accept, if you offer to work hard, and stick with it,the only failure- will be that defeat didn’t prevail.

Don’t ever give up.

Dusty

-- Dusty

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Obi

2213 posts in 2925 days


#5 posted 01-25-2007 04:40 AM

When I started down this road 1 year ago, I’d never designed a kitchen. I’d built cabinets. But the friend that was pushing me down this path had already spend a couple thousand dollars and in my minnd I thought … “I’d quit, but I got too many tools.” Then as i went along, I thought “I’d quit, but I’m the boss.” And it was already too late. I’d built a 7-sided custom tree house. And in my mind I had already established my motto … “I can fix it!” Even if I can’t I can make another one. So far there have been very few things that I’ve made that i couldn’t fix.

Here’s one for you cabinet makers:
You just completed the bottom cabinets. You’ve made all the raised panel doors, stained them, laquered them and then you drill the holes for the knobs. At the bottom. Since you can’t open the bottom cabinets with your feet, what do you do?

I’ll give you my solution later.

Since they are Arched raised panels you CAN NOT turn the doors upside down

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cabinetman

144 posts in 2831 days


#6 posted 01-26-2007 04:42 PM

Well Obi, I’ve gotta admit I HAVE made that mistake. So, here’s what I did to fix it. It was only a few doors before I realized what an absolute fool I was, so since the seam for where the rail meets the stile lines up at the top and bottom rail, I sheared off a top layer of the stile, I think it was about an 1/8” along the whole verticle face of the stile to the seam. Then I cut a piece of the same specie 1/8” thick, jointed the edge where it met the rail, and glued and clamped it to the stile. When dry resanded and reprofiled the edges. Had to refinish with lacquer, but it came out good.

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Obi

2213 posts in 2925 days


#7 posted 01-26-2007 04:59 PM

I’d drilled the holes on the bottoms of all the doors, and since I was new at the whole design/manufacture of Arched raised panels, I went through the entire thought process. Didnt want to make all new doors (too expensive and time consuming). Thought about cutting off the stile but didnt want to have to re-cut re-router everything, and I hate to admit it but it wasn’t me that came up with the idea. The friend I was building them for took a nap and when he got up he asked me “How thinck is your saw blade?” I told him 1/8th inch. He said “Why don’t you just cut the stile 1/4” inside the the hole and flip the piece.” Reglued it, sanded and only had to refininsh the portion that was sanded.

Took about three hours.

This whole scenario is only to point out that with wood, almost anything can be fixed.

I’ve even learned a technique on how to “stretch” a board.

All things are possible to he who believes.

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