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Forum topic by nerdbot posted 10-14-2015 04:30 AM 736 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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nerdbot

97 posts in 821 days


10-14-2015 04:30 AM

Hi guys,

I’m in the middle of building doors for my office (I’ve posted on it a couple times now). Because nothing ever goes quite as planned, the project is taking longer than I expected. Long story short, I’ve milled and cut all my parts to final dimensions and finished all my mortises. I’ll be cutting the loose tenons tomorrow, and then the panels.

Problem is, I leave for a business trip at the end of the week for a whole week. I’ve heard the advice given that as soon as you do your final milling and cutting to final size, you should do your joinery and assembly as soon as possible. It’ll be close, but my plan is to at least get the doors glued up and a wash coat of shellac on the doors before I leave.

My question is, do I need to do everything possible to get those doors assembled before I leave them for a week, or is it not as critical as I think? Or is it worse than I thought and I need to have more than a wash coat of shellac on the doors?

Thanks!


12 replies so far

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3646 posts in 1725 days


#1 posted 10-14-2015 04:59 AM

My friend, I have started projects, hit a stumbling points and quit. I’ve comeback a few days later, refreshed and recovered. In the mean time I’ve also mulled over the project and come up with solutions to problems that made the project work easier. My advice is that if you are not on a time schedule, don’t push yourself. Your project will still be there when you get back to it. Tomorrow I begin finishing a flag case for my Dad’s flag. I did a very little on it and left it sit for 10 years. Why, you ask? It is a very emotional project and I still miss my Dad more than I care to say. I know it’s still waiting for me and I will more than meet the challenge. Sometimes all someone needs is a brief break. Time to regroup, refocus and find the direction you need. Go forth and conquer!

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nerdbot

97 posts in 821 days


#2 posted 10-14-2015 06:30 AM

Haha, BurlyBob, yeah I had to step away one day on this project when I was going crazy trying to figure out why more blue paint kept showing up on my milled stock. I’d sand or wipe it off, run another piece through, and it’d reappear. It wasn’t until later that afternoon I realized I hadn’t cut off the painted ends from the lumber. After that I decided to call it quits for the day and come back refreshed. :) I think someone else here mentioned after 2 “oopses” like that, they call it a day – which I’ve tried to follow as well.

But actually, I should’ve clarified in my original post: what I am mostly concerned about is the wood moving while I’m gone, and things no longer coming together square after I put all the work into cutting the joinery.

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rwe2156

2188 posts in 941 days


#3 posted 10-14-2015 11:47 AM

I don’t think you’ll have a problem.

You’ll be touching up all the joints with a hand plane after assembly anyway.

Right?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3926 posts in 1953 days


#4 posted 10-14-2015 12:03 PM

You will be fine, as long as you remember where you left off. That’s always my downfall, there’s a step I’ll forget and skip it, only to find myself with some rework. I make notes of what’s next if I have to leave something for a few days; but my mental acuity is almost certainly not as good as yours.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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nerdbot

97 posts in 821 days


#5 posted 10-14-2015 04:35 PM

rwe2156, I was going to touch up the stiles with a hand plane as necessary. I wasn’t sure what I was going to do about the end grain on the rails, but after your comment I did a bit of research on shooting boards, and turns out I have the right plane for the job (low angle bevel up smoother plane) so I just need to make a shooting board.

Thanks for all the input guys, I won’t have to kill myself to get this done in a couple days.

View Gerald Thompson's profile (online now)

Gerald Thompson

808 posts in 1694 days


#6 posted 10-14-2015 05:08 PM

My wife and I are into #9 1840 Shaker Clock. It is too hot and humid here if FL to work in the summer and early fall.
I have it all cut and lying in another used room in the house. Next is the M&T, hinge mort. and rabbets for the glass. Then final sanding, most of the finish and assembly.
I does take awhile to get back into the project but we have done the others this way without much of a problem.
This is the LAST ONE!

-- Jerry

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4020 posts in 1811 days


#7 posted 10-14-2015 06:07 PM

It would be better to let it sit during your trip than to try a rush through it and mess something up because of your artificial deadline. Ideally you do your assembly after cutting the joinery. But life is seldom ideal, a week is nothing really, at most you may have to tweak a tenon or two when you come back. I’d get done what you can then finish up when you get back and not worry about it. Your fears are unfounded.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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nerdbot

97 posts in 821 days


#8 posted 10-14-2015 07:13 PM

I think I’m actually at a good stopping point now, all the mortises have been cut – tenons are loose tenons, so I’ll cut those when I get back. I was planning on cutting the panel grooves in the rails and stiles before I left, but I’m thinking that could probably wait too.

Any suggestions for storing the pieces while I’m gone? I was just planning on stacking the parts flat, uncovered, with stickers in between.

View Gerald Thompson's profile (online now)

Gerald Thompson

808 posts in 1694 days


#9 posted 10-14-2015 08:32 PM

I would store the pieces in approximately the same environment the project will end up in. I have done this with several items and have had no trouble with wood movement.

-- Jerry

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3665 posts in 1180 days


#10 posted 10-21-2015 12:09 PM

Sounds like you’d be ok with waiting and being able to take your time, though I would leave the milled stock where it is to be used so it can acclimate. This shouldn’t be a problem if you’re not a procrastinator like me. I started a dresser for my wife over 5 years ago then got distracted and it’s still not yet done.

View rwe2156's profile (online now)

rwe2156

2188 posts in 941 days


#11 posted 10-21-2015 01:00 PM



rwe2156, I was going to touch up the stiles with a hand plane as necessary. I wasn t sure what I was going to do about the end grain on the rails, but after your comment I did a bit of research on shooting boards, and turns out I have the right plane for the job (low angle bevel up smoother plane) so I just need to make a shooting board.

Thanks for all the input guys, I won t have to kill myself to get this done in a couple days.

- nerdbot

You don’t need a shooting board you have the rails to guide you.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1211 posts in 1570 days


#12 posted 10-21-2015 01:12 PM

I like to write out my next few steps before stepping away from a project for more than a few days. This helps me get back into the flow much faster without missing steps or making mistakes.

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