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Getting a uniform look to textured ceiling

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Forum topic by boston_guy posted 10-13-2015 08:15 PM 687 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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boston_guy

144 posts in 1610 days


10-13-2015 08:15 PM

I’m baffled and need help.

Last summer my living room ceiling was plastered smooth.

My bedroom ceiling was plastered smooth.

My kitchen ceiling was supposed to be plastered smooth but the guy I used lied to me. He did not really know how to plaster. He had only worked as an aide to real plasterers. Luckily, he had only done the kitchen ceiling. When he failed to plaster the ceiling properly, he called in his friends who were real plasterers. They came and tried the best they could to correct the kitchen ceiling with joint compound. But the kitchen ceiling ended up having some texture in certain spots.

His friends then did the plastering for the living room and bedroom. Both of these rooms came out with a uniform, smooth look. And when I painted the rooms they still had a uniform, smooth look, as I previously mentioned.

However, when his friends corrected the kitchen ceiling there was texture in some areas while other areas were smooth.

I am now painting the kitchen ceiling. I’m using Behr Premium Plus Interior Ceiling Flat Paint (http://www.homedepot.com/p/BEHR-Premium-Plus-1-gal-Flat-Interior-Ceiling-Paint-55801/100206081?AID=11210757&PID=6158626&SID=ifpruoyeeq00zey5001rw&cm_mmc=CJ--6158626--11210757&cj=true).

In terms of roller covers, I’m using a 9-inch 1-1/4 inch High-Density one (http://www.homedepot.com/p/Linzer-9-in-x-1-1-4-in-High-Density-Polyester-Roller-Cover-RC-147/100211700?AID=11210757&PID=6158626&SID=ifprvv4g0d00zey5001rw&cm_mmc=CJ--6158626--11210757&cj=true).

Here’s the problem. When you look at the living room ceiling from my kitchen, it has a uniform white look. The only dark spot is the shadow of the ceiling fan which is okay. See below:

 photo livingroomceiling_zpshy2y1mjp.jpg

Now let us go to the kitchen ceiling and view it from the living room. Before doing this let me remind you that the kitchen ceiling has smooth and textured areas. This is an example of a smooth area:

 photo kitchenceilingsmooth_zpsbzhcxcl1.jpg

This is an example of a textured area:

 photo kitchenceilingtextured_zpsnrr56p3m.jpg

The problem is that after I painted the entire kitchen ceiling I still had dark spots where there was texture. This is how the kitchen ceiling looks like when viewed from my living room:

 photo kitchenceiling_zpszhkkyoxa.jpg

I desperately need advice:

1) After the second coat of paint, should I have gotten a new roller cover?

2) Should I simply go over the dark spots with more paint?

3) Or is there nothing I can do about the dark spots?

Any feedback will be HIGHLY appreciated.

Thanks!


6 replies so far

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Kelly

1108 posts in 2404 days


#1 posted 10-13-2015 08:33 PM

When I mud, texture and paint, I get all the mud done, then prime. Next, I texture. Finally, I paint. This always leaves me with a uniform finish, even with knock down texture.

When I roll, I try to keep a wet edge, to avoid lap marks. I get a coat on, then force myself to allow drying time. Then spray or roll my second coat.

You shouldn’t have to change out the roller, unless it’s trashed.

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boston_guy

144 posts in 1610 days


#2 posted 10-14-2015 03:48 PM

Thank you for your advice.

One thing I realized, after I started this thread, is that there were some textured areas that I had skimmed with joint compound. These were the areas around the recessed light because some patching was needed. But when I painted the ceiling these areas did not have dark spots like the areas that were textured but not skimmed with joint compound.

I therefore decided to skim the dark areas with joint compound using a wide putty knife today. The problem is that I will have to paint the ceiling again. But I don’t care. If it gives it a more uniform look it will be worth it.

My question: Whenever I’ve used joint compound on the ceiling I’ve primed it before painting. I use Zinsser Cover Stain Oil Base Interior & Exterior Primer. Is it necessary to prime? For paint I’m using Behr Premium Plus Interior Ceiling Flat Paint.

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mahdee

3548 posts in 1228 days


#3 posted 10-14-2015 04:06 PM

No, you don’t have to do anything with the joins different. There is a kiltz anti-stain (I really don’t know the name) that covers stains and things like that. Your problem maybe that the mud has not totally dried in certain area and it looks uneven.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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boston_guy

144 posts in 1610 days


#4 posted 10-14-2015 04:47 PM

I don’t need to prime before painting?


No, you don t have to do anything with the joins different. There is a kiltz anti-stain (I really don t know the name) that covers stains and things like that. Your problem maybe that the mud has not totally dried in certain area and it looks uneven.

- mrjinx007


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mahdee

3548 posts in 1228 days


#5 posted 10-14-2015 05:14 PM

I am sorry,
I misunderstood your question. If your joint compound was not pre-mixed with primer or you didn’t mix it, then yes, it would be a good idea to prime it first. However, a lot of new paints are the combination of paint and primer.
I did our studio with the paint and then primer and it turned out pretty good.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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Kelly

1108 posts in 2404 days


#6 posted 10-17-2015 06:01 PM

Never heard of joint compound mixed with primer, but then, never heard of a lot of things.

I like to use PVA primer over raw rock and mud. It’s cheap and seals well.

If you do go with regular primer and are painting a wall or ceiling with color, think about having it tinted the color of your paint. If a yahoo from a big box said it can’t be done, as several have told me, go to a real paint store.

If you prime with a regular primer, such as one which blocks stains, there shouldn’t be any reason to prime with something else before painting. Stain blocker is a sealer (often, shellac).

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