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What kind of shelving should I use for bedroom?

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Forum topic by boston_guy posted 10-12-2015 07:37 PM 626 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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boston_guy

144 posts in 1616 days


10-12-2015 07:37 PM

I have a small condo that I’m renovating.

There’s this space, to the right of my open bedroom closet, that could be utilized for shelving. The space is 10 inches deep by 3 feet wide by 7 feet tall.

I would like to install shelves in this space for my clothes, bed sheets, etc.

My question is what type of shelving would be best?

Someone I know suggested wire shelves from Home Depot. He claimed that wire shelves are better than wood shelves for clothing because air can pass through them. Also, you don’t have to worry about painting them.

I have learned that it never hurts to ask for suggestions. What type of shelving would you use if it was your space?

Any feedback will be highly appreciated.

Below is a photo of the space in my bedroom.

 photo bedroomshelving_zpss20s4egq.jpg


12 replies so far

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boston_guy

144 posts in 1616 days


#1 posted 10-13-2015 02:23 AM

Forgot to mention my biggest problem: The whole bedroom is only 7 feet by 11 feet.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 947 days


#2 posted 10-13-2015 09:58 AM

Its all a personal design choice, really.

I have wire shelves in my walk in closet and are very good, although not very attractive to me.

If there is no door, and aesthetics matter, then simple wood shelves on support strips would suffice.

You could also go with adjustable shelf standards w/ wood shelves. Once again, not very attractive (to me) but may suit your needs.

No doors on the closets?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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AZWoody

697 posts in 690 days


#3 posted 10-13-2015 02:13 PM

For my master bedroom I made shelves with oak plywood and they look good. For the guest rooms, I used Rubbermaid’s Homefree sets which are very versatile and easy to install. The only bad thing, is they’re not much to look at as they are wire shelves.

If i had an exposed area like that, I would probably do some kind of floating shelf system with plywood with a veneer on the front face.

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Redoak49

1959 posts in 1455 days


#4 posted 10-13-2015 02:34 PM

If I had the tools and place to make them then oak plywood shelves with hardwood edging would be great.

The heavy duty wire shelves are a quick way to get adjustable shelving. I have them in several closets and happy with them but they are behind closet doors.

The other thing is time and priority..if you have other projects to do then you could use wire shelves for awhile and do wood ones later.

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boston_guy

144 posts in 1616 days


#5 posted 10-13-2015 03:11 PM

The bedroom is too small to have doors that open out. The whole room is only 7 feet by 11 feet.

No doors on the closets?

- rwe2156


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helluvawreck

23199 posts in 2333 days


#6 posted 10-13-2015 04:08 PM

When we moved into our house the hall closet near the entry hall had this wire upper shelf which was also what supported the clothes suspended underneath by hangers. This is the closet which is used for everyone’s jackets and coats. There was such a load on this shelf that it failed about 6 months from when we moved in. I went to the big box store and got another brand that was nearly the same. It also failed in the same sudden manner after a few months. With everybody’s coats and jackets it is obviously overloaded. In our other closets we have had no problems with these wire type shelves. I’m going to make a 3/4 shelf out of plywood with 6-8 inch wide plywood cleats for the shelf to sit on and also to hold up a 1-1/4 inch steel pipe to hold all of the clothes on hangers. I will probably nail a 1-1/2 wide wood banding on the front edge of the shelf to combat bowing of the shelf. I will make sure the cleats are supported by screws into studs. It will all be painted white to match the closet walls. This may be overkill but I’m tired of the hassle it has caused. The bottom line is that if you are going to have a lot of weight these kinds of wire shelves can fail because most all of the weight is supported by brackets and screws from the back wall which can put a lot of stress on the fasteners and brackets.

Anyways, just my two cents worth. It may not apply to you because of the load you put on your shelves.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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BurlyBob

3695 posts in 1732 days


#7 posted 10-13-2015 04:09 PM

How about a freestanding book case. A nice snug fit, slide it in and put a couple of shims under the front to keep it from leaning forward. Your in a condo and probably won’t live there your entire life. You move, it goes with you. Build it do it breaks down easy, screws and no glue. Put on a nice finish or paint and your good to go.

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boston_guy

144 posts in 1616 days


#8 posted 10-13-2015 04:14 PM

My dream is to rent out this condo when I finally move to a bigger place. I’m therefore thinking that it would be convenient for me and the future renter to have shelves in place. The less moving of furniture around the better for the condo, I think (it reduces the number of times walls and floors get scratched).


How about a freestanding book case. A nice snug fit, slide it in and put a couple of shims under the front to keep it from leaning forward. Your in a condo and probably won t live there your entire life. You move, it goes with you. Build it do it breaks down easy, screws and no glue. Put on a nice finish or paint and your good to go.

- BurlyBob


View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 689 days


#9 posted 10-14-2015 03:10 AM

A carpenter could build shelves narrow enough to remain behind and above the headboard.If you were able to find a clever carpenter you could build shelves that remained behind and partially below the headboard set with pulleys to raise the shelves up for extra storage

-- I meant to do that!

View DalyArcher's profile

DalyArcher

72 posts in 586 days


#10 posted 10-15-2015 07:11 PM

5/8” melamine fronted with either edge banding tape or a hardwood of your liking. Clean, durable and inexpensive.

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boston_guy

144 posts in 1616 days


#11 posted 10-16-2015 03:40 AM

Ghidrah,

You lost me when it came to pulleys. I have no idea what you mean by them. If you care to explain I’m all ears. Anyway, thanks for trying to help.


5/8” melamine fronted with either edge banding tape or a hardwood of your liking. Clean, durable and inexpensive.

- DalyArcher


A carpenter could build shelves narrow enough to remain behind and above the headboard.If you were able to find a clever carpenter you could build shelves that remained behind and partially below the headboard set with pulleys to raise the shelves up for extra storage

- Ghidrah


A carpenter could build shelves narrow enough to remain behind and above the headboard.If you were able to find a clever carpenter you could build shelves that remained behind and partially below the headboard set with pulleys to raise the shelves up for extra storage

- Ghidrah


A carpenter could build shelves narrow enough to remain behind and above the headboard.If you were able to find a clever carpenter you could build shelves that remained behind and partially below the headboard set with pulleys to raise the shelves up for extra storage

- Ghidrah


View boston_guy's profile

boston_guy

144 posts in 1616 days


#12 posted 10-16-2015 03:44 AM

DalyArcher,

I googled melamine after you mentioned it. I would never be caught close to that stuff. Hardwood would be more of my style. Nevertheless, I really appreciate your trying to help me.


5/8” melamine fronted with either edge banding tape or a hardwood of your liking. Clean, durable and inexpensive.

- DalyArcher


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