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Location of solid pin

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Forum topic by TopamaxSurvivor posted 12-06-2009 05:05 AM 855 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TopamaxSurvivor

15090 posts in 2430 days


12-06-2009 05:05 AM

Topic tags/keywords: bread board design

I was just looking at this project plan in another thread. I am wondering why it calls for the solid pin on the bread board end to be on the end and the two slotted ones are in the middle and the other end. Why not have the solid one in the middle and let it expand and contract both ways? Seems a little each way would be less likely to split that all one way over a longer span.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence


13 replies so far

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Jack Barnhill

366 posts in 2120 days


#1 posted 12-06-2009 05:30 AM

If I’m looking at the correct pin, I believe it is because the side where the fixed pin is located is hinged and so it shouldn’t be allowed to move. Let me know if I’m looking at the wrong place.

-- Best regards, Jack -- I may not be good, but I'm slow -- www.BarnhillWoodworks.com

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TopamaxSurvivor

15090 posts in 2430 days


#2 posted 12-06-2009 05:47 AM

Jack, You are looking at the right place. I thought of that, but since since the hinges are attached to the sliding board, it shouldn’t matter if the whole thing slides away or it just expands a little both ways from the middle. Seems it would have les stress sliding both ways form the middle. If the hinges were attached to the end board, you obviously woundn’t want the expansion to tighten up gap between the two sides that are supporting the hinges.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Jack Barnhill

366 posts in 2120 days


#3 posted 12-06-2009 06:03 AM

TopamaxSurvivor, I think that, if the fixed pin was in the middle, when the panel dried out and shrunk, the fixed pin would pull the breadboard end into the panel on the other side of the hinge. With the fixed pin is on the end with the hinges, the panel and the breadboard end stay a constant distance from the other panel. Does that sound right?

-- Best regards, Jack -- I may not be good, but I'm slow -- www.BarnhillWoodworks.com

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TopamaxSurvivor

15090 posts in 2430 days


#4 posted 12-06-2009 06:44 AM

Yeah, i guess in the case of drying out more, that would be a valid point. Never thought of lumber shrinking small after the build. I supose it could if it weren’t kiln dried. I was thinking of expansion of dried lumber then contraction. thx ;-)

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Karson

34916 posts in 3155 days


#5 posted 12-06-2009 06:52 AM

I believe that the way that the pin is placed to not allow and difference is the spacing at the intersection of the hinged front with the back section.

All of the movement would be toward the front of the lid. It seems that the designer wanted any gapage to be maintained as almost non existence at the hinge line.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

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lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 1861 days


#6 posted 12-06-2009 08:20 AM

Hey Bob
I think this is one of those occasions I should sit here and look stoopid, rather than open my mouth and remove all doubt…..BUT…
I see what you are talking about. I think Jack hit the nail on the head with his second comment.
Rand

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studie

618 posts in 1901 days


#7 posted 12-06-2009 08:28 AM

I think every application like this is also in the center like you said expansion would be equal. But as the others say the hinge side has a consideration of a mechanical point. Why not just use epoxy & be done with expansion for good, my guess is something would give eventually. This is why we should trust those before us & follow old school rules.

-- $tudie

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TopamaxSurvivor

15090 posts in 2430 days


#8 posted 12-06-2009 09:07 AM

but Scott, I have to know why? What would happen if??? If one memorizes all the old school rules he can become a good journeyman, but with a good basis in theory, he can become a master and isn’t limited by his memory of the old school rules :-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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TopamaxSurvivor

15090 posts in 2430 days


#9 posted 12-06-2009 09:37 AM

Rand, that is why I ask questions here rather than explain:-)) Unless its electrical.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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degoose

7052 posts in 2109 days


#10 posted 12-06-2009 11:32 AM

Please post a pic of the desk when it is completed Bob.

-- Drink twice... and don't bother to cut... @ lazylarrywoodworks.com.au For lovers of all things timber...

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stefang

13633 posts in 2088 days


#11 posted 12-06-2009 01:23 PM

My take on this is that the fixed board is much narrower and therefore will not move much. The lid is very wide and that is where the room to move is provided. This will keep the hinge gap constant and prevent the lid from cracking.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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TopamaxSurvivor

15090 posts in 2430 days


#12 posted 12-07-2009 03:34 AM

Larry, I’m not making it. Just wonder why do it that way? I suppose letting everything move away form the hinge is the reason. I was thinking having the solid pin in the middle would be less lateral movement on each of 2 axis; therefore, more stable and lower chance of splitting over the centuries :-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 1861 days


#13 posted 12-07-2009 07:27 AM

Sorry, Bob, I had to go do a brake job. I went back and looked agian and puzzled on it a bit. I still think Jack was right. Rand

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