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What is an Inexpensive Fastening System for Picture Frames for Small Shops?

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Forum topic by helluvawreck posted 10-11-2015 06:17 PM 1258 views 0 times favorited 34 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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helluvawreck

23175 posts in 2331 days


10-11-2015 06:17 PM

Topic tags/keywords: fastening system for picture frames picture frames

What is an inexpensive fastening system for picture frames for small shops? Thanks

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau


34 replies so far

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Dutchy

2018 posts in 1633 days


#1 posted 10-11-2015 06:25 PM

a nail,

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?

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helluvawreck

23175 posts in 2331 days


#2 posted 10-11-2015 06:34 PM

Dutchy, thanks for the comment. This is for small production in a small shop. A nail may not be fast enough. I don’t know if there’s anything that is affordable. I hope there might be. I can build a decent clamp system with air cylinders but what about the fastening of the frames?

Thanks,

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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madts

1683 posts in 1804 days


#3 posted 10-11-2015 06:46 PM

1/2 a nail if things are tight!

Madts.

-- Thor and Odin are still the greatest of Gods.

View Don Butler's profile

Don Butler

1086 posts in 2860 days


#4 posted 10-11-2015 06:47 PM

Most frames shops use brad nailers, but I have known people to use CA with accelerator, some use just wood glue. That isn’t very fast.
I personally like a brad nailer with Titebond III.

Don

-- No trees were damaged in posting this message, but thousands of electrons were seriously inconvenienced.

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Joe Lyddon

9443 posts in 3517 days


#5 posted 10-11-2015 06:48 PM

Nails/Pins shot with a FAST air gun? :)

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

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drewpy

568 posts in 821 days


#6 posted 10-11-2015 06:48 PM

brad nailer

-- Drew in Ohio -- "The greatest wealth is health".

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helluvawreck

23175 posts in 2331 days


#7 posted 10-11-2015 06:54 PM

With a brad gun or hammer? I assume that you mean in the edge thru first piece into adjacent piece with brad or nails parallel to face and perpendicular to the mitered joint line. I have made some frames like this but not in quantity. It might work if I had the right clamp setup.

Thanks, Madts.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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MrUnix

4226 posts in 1663 days


#8 posted 10-11-2015 06:57 PM

Are these frames that are being made on demand, or something that you can glue and put aside to dry for a few hours? When I’m doing multiple frames (and I only have 1 frame clamp), I’ll glue and clamp the frame, then shoot one or two staples across each joint (after waiting a couple minutes for the glue to setup) so I can take it out of the clamp and move on the the next one. The staples get removed after it’s all dry. If glue isn’t an option, corner v-nail systems work great… and range anywhere from a fairly cheap hand held punch tool to pretty fancy clamp/press systems that can get expensive quick.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Don Butler's profile

Don Butler

1086 posts in 2860 days


#9 posted 10-11-2015 06:58 PM

I use an electric brad nailer.
Then brads go in throughthe corner into the adjacent member. Two in each corner would allow you to keep working until the glue cures.

Don

-- No trees were damaged in posting this message, but thousands of electrons were seriously inconvenienced.

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GaryL

1094 posts in 2295 days


#10 posted 10-11-2015 07:04 PM

http://www.amazon.com/PICTURE-V-NAILER-JOINING-Diameter-Picture/dp/B00NMM4HIY

This is something along the lines of what I’ve been wanting to get. Is this what your looking for? Shoot and deliver.
There are also press versions of the v nailer that push the v nail in rather than shooting it. I believe that is what most frame shops use.
I have a corrugated nailer but it’s a bit too aggressive for picture frames.

-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

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Joe Lyddon

9443 posts in 3517 days


#11 posted 10-11-2015 07:06 PM

I’ve seen a Plastic glue on TV that’s supposed to be SUPER STRONG… one dab… treat with UV light (push button), & it’s cured almost instantly…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

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helluvawreck

23175 posts in 2331 days


#12 posted 10-11-2015 07:07 PM

25 piece’s at a time and all the same size. They would just need to be made reasonably efficient or it wouldn’t be practical. They would be for a craft product, laser engraved signs for the internet. The item framed would be 1/16 – 1/8 laser engraved plywood.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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DocSavage45

7704 posts in 2307 days


#13 posted 10-11-2015 07:08 PM

Charles,

If you are working quantities of frames might set up jigs that will hold the frames? Next is speed vs. Quality? a spliene might not be fast as a nailer or Pneumatic stapler, but you can emphasize quality of construction in your sales pitch?

Harbor freight also sells banding straps, which might be efficient as well if you are gluing?

Them’s my two quarters worth but now worth two cents? LOL!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Sodabowski's profile

Sodabowski

2308 posts in 2297 days


#14 posted 10-11-2015 07:11 PM

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=52289&cat=1,43293

I saw it as a pneumatic version somewhere if I remember well, but can’t seem to find it back

-- Thomas - Pondering the inclusion of woodworking into physics and chemistry classes...

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helluvawreck

23175 posts in 2331 days


#15 posted 10-11-2015 07:18 PM

I would build a pneumatic frame clamp to hold them during glueup and assembly. However, they would have to be removable from the clamp immediately so the fastener would have to be strong enough to keep them secure while drying. I have thought about the spline idea but I don’t think the price would allow it. If I had the clamp next to my engraver I might could allow them to sit in the clamp for 3-5 minutes without to much inefficiency in order to secure them better before removing them for the glue to dry.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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