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Forum topic by wmgworks posted 10-10-2015 12:00 AM 856 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wmgworks

193 posts in 446 days


10-10-2015 12:00 AM

There is a CL ad for a 1 HP router with some guides and a dovetail jig for $40. When I look up reviews on the router I find none at that hp level. everything is 1 3/4 and up. I don’t own a router and want to get one. Will that one work for weekend warrior type stuff?

-- Butchering wood since 2015


24 replies so far

View Clarkie's profile

Clarkie

380 posts in 1302 days


#1 posted 10-10-2015 01:54 AM

That router will work, but it will work to make you want a more powerful one. Usually the 1 hp only has a 1/4” collet system and while it will cut, you’ll never be satisfied until you get your hands on a 2 or 3 1/4hp with a 1/2” collet system. If you just want to get familiar with using one then for 40.00 you can’t really go wrong. Have fun, make some dust.

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 547 days


#2 posted 10-10-2015 11:49 PM



There is a CL ad for a 1 HP router with some guides and a dovetail jig for $40. When I look up reviews on the router I find none at that hp level. everything is 1 3/4 and up. I don t own a router and want to get one. Will that one work for weekend warrior type stuff?

- wmgworks

Ditto to what Clarkie said—especially stay away from 1/4” collets, you’ll just get frustrated with it (and if you over-match it with a project, it could be unsafe). Personally, I like a moderate-sized router for hand work (PC690, for instance), and then a big horse in a router table (e.g., Freud 3+HP oldie). You might check eBay for the Porter-Cable 690, which is an older model, see if there’s a good one that includes the plunge base. Then you’d be pretty well set for most projects. Think twice about buying a cheap or junkie router—I bought 2 or 3 before I got smart and waited for a good one to hit CL. Lost some $$ on the cr*p that could have been spent for a decent router bit or two (or three).

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1141 days


#3 posted 10-11-2015 12:07 AM

I have a Dewalt 1 1/4 HP compact router that is absolutely wonderful to use for light duty work. It’s my goto router for things like rounding over table edges or even small mortises. It’s light weight and LED light makes it very easy to use. Now I also have a 2 1/2 HP router that I use with larger bits and a big router that spends it life in a table but for a lot of things those small routers have a lot of advantages.

Does the router have both a fixed and plunge base? A 1 HP router with a fixed base only is probably more in line with a trimmer than a full featured router. Also is it variable speed or fixed?

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wmgworks

193 posts in 446 days


#4 posted 10-11-2015 12:14 AM



Think twice about buying a cheap or junkie router—I bought 2 or 3 before I got smart and waited for a good one to hit CL. Lost some $$ on the cr*p that could have been spent for a decent router bit or two (or three).

- ForestGrl

Which is why I posed the question first :) I don’t want to buy more than I need, but I don’t want to spend money on useless stuff either

Thanks!

-- Butchering wood since 2015

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ForestGrl

445 posts in 547 days


#5 posted 10-11-2015 03:37 AM


Which is why I posed the question first :) I don t want to buy more than I need, but I don t want to spend money on useless stuff either

Thanks!

- wmgworks

Another heads-up from one who’s been there: routers can almost be like clamps “Can’t have too many.” ;-)

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3038 days


#6 posted 10-11-2015 03:58 AM

I agree with Forest girl you can’t have too many routers(having 38 myself).As a handheld router goes a 1 1/2 hp works fine for must operations. I also agree that 1/2” router collets and bits give you the best performance. Just likemost tools the low-end product lines don’t last as long or perform as well.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Glen Peterson's profile

Glen Peterson

556 posts in 2517 days


#7 posted 10-11-2015 04:12 AM

I agree with Jim and FG. I think I have 6 routers. The first was a craftsman. If you lived nearby I’d give it to you. The one in the ad is likely sufficient. But you will buy others with more power, larger collet, that plunge, to set under a table, or even a handy trim router.
Cheers

-- Glen

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Glen Peterson

556 posts in 2517 days


#8 posted 10-11-2015 04:14 AM

I agree with Jim and FG. I think I have 6 routers. The first was a craftsman. If you lived nearby I’d give it to you. The one in the ad is likely sufficient. But you will buy others with more power, larger collet, that plunge, to set under a table, or even a handy trim router.
Cheers

-- Glen

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2322 posts in 1757 days


#9 posted 10-11-2015 01:04 PM

You never tell us the brand of the router.

I have a Craftsman that only takes 1/4 inch collet bits and for simple round over or edge bead it’s just fine. I also bought a Bosch Colt last year and it excels at that kind of work without the heft of the Craftsman and I prefer using that. Before you go out and buy a massive router try a small one first. Big CAN be too big.

View wmgworks's profile

wmgworks

193 posts in 446 days


#10 posted 10-11-2015 02:23 PM


Does the router have both a fixed and plunge base? A 1 HP router with a fixed base only is probably more in line with a trimmer than a full featured router. Also is it variable speed or fixed?

- Richard H

Thanks Richard. It’s a fixed base. And fixed speed.

-- Butchering wood since 2015

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wmgworks

193 posts in 446 days


#11 posted 10-11-2015 02:29 PM



You never tell us the brand of the router.

I have a Craftsman that only takes 1/4 inch collet bits and for simple round over or edge bead it s just fine. I also bought a Bosch Colt last year and it excels at that kind of work without the heft of the Craftsman and I prefer using that. Before you go out and buy a massive router try a small one first. Big CAN be too big.

- dhazelton

Here a link to the ad. It’s a Craftsman. It also comes with some templates and a dovetail jig. Thought maybe if the router wasn’t worth the money everything else might be

-- Butchering wood since 2015

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 547 days


#12 posted 10-11-2015 09:49 PM


Here a link to the ad. It s a Craftsman. It also comes with some templates and a dovetail jig. Thought maybe if the router wasn t worth the money everything else might be

- wmgworks

Here's a good link (yours had a couple extra letters in the url). Craftsman dovetail jigs are pretty inexpensive, especially one that short (narrow). I would not want to run dovetails with that router. IMHO, not a direction you want to head. Hang tight for one of the better brands, so you can build on it. Don’t know if you can afford new, but with the holidays coming up, there will be some good sales!

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View wmgworks's profile

wmgworks

193 posts in 446 days


#13 posted 10-12-2015 01:30 AM



I agree with Jim and FG. I think I have 6 routers. The first was a craftsman. If you lived nearby I d give it to you. The one in the ad is likely sufficient. But you will buy others with more power, larger collet, that plunge, to set under a table, or even a handy trim router.
Cheers

- Glen Peterson

Out of curiosity – why so many routers? I only saw needing 3. ONe mounted in a table, one fixed and one plunge. Why so many? (sorry – little new to some of this)

-- Butchering wood since 2015

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 547 days


#14 posted 10-12-2015 02:33 AM


I agree with Jim and FG. I think I have 6 routers. The first was a craftsman. If you lived nearby I d give it to you. The one in the ad is likely sufficient. But you will buy others with more power, larger collet, that plunge, to set under a table, or even a handy trim router.
Cheers

- Glen Peterson

Out of curiosity – why so many routers? I only saw needing 3. ONe mounted in a table, one fixed and one plunge. Why so many? (sorry – little new to some of this)

- wmgworks

The three you list are plenty to get your work done. If one happens to “accidently” buy an extra router or two (including a trim router), then it’s a bit easier to do multi-step procedures, keeping your setting on each router as you move from one piece to another, even one day to the next. Truth be told, you probably could get by with two: 1 fixed-base, and a plunge that would work either in-hand or in a table. A hassle, but doable.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3123 days


#15 posted 10-12-2015 01:41 PM

Out of curiosity – why so many routers? I only saw needing 3. ONe mounted in a table, one fixed and one plunge. Why so many? (sorry – little new to some of this)

If you are using routers to make your living, time is money. I have a friend who is a pro (he builds high-end conference tables, etc.) ... he has a floor-to-ceiling bookshelf in his shop that is loaded with routers. Each has a specific bit, setup to cut a specific profile. Instead of tinkering around changing and calibrating bits, he just grabs the appropriate router and gets on with it.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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