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Forum topic by patco64 posted 10-08-2015 10:08 PM 886 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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patco64

6 posts in 427 days


10-08-2015 10:08 PM

I built a lathe and bought some turning tools but in the set I have the fluted gouges are all flat ended. And every time I see a wood turner using his tools they are using a flared back fluted gouge. Is this something I need to do too one of my gouges myself or do some come that way. I have 3 in varying widths.
Thank you in advance for your help


15 replies so far

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1886 posts in 1600 days


#1 posted 10-08-2015 10:45 PM

You really need to post pictures of tool you have before can answer your question sounds like talking about continental gouges and or skews & scrapers.

A lot of spindle turning sets have tools like these.

http://www.harborfreight.com/professional-high-speed-steel-wood-turning-set-8-pc-61794.html

This set comes with a 3/8” & ½ “ spindle gouge that can put on a fingernail or side ground bevel on.
Same with this set

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=packard&Category_Code=tools-pkrd-m2-sts

Only difference betwwen the two sets is number of gouges and HF throws in two continental or german roughing gosges and Packard has one U shape roughing gouge. Quality maybe another issue.

-- Bill

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4035 posts in 1817 days


#2 posted 10-08-2015 11:13 PM

Most roughing gouges have flat ends. They are so many ways to grind a gouge that it really doesn’t matter, grind them the way you like them. You need to figure out whether you have spindle gouges or bowl gouges and then find a grind you like for each.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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patco64

6 posts in 427 days


#3 posted 10-09-2015 12:19 AM

Here is a pic of the 3 gouges that I have the largest 1 1/4 is a roughing gouge I guess and the other 2 don’t look to have a deep enough flute as the ones I have seen that are cut back on the sides but looks can be deceiving. I think I will cut back the small one to look like a fingernail because I don’t know for sure if they are spindle or bowl gouges. Also got a pic of my lathe I made

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

271 posts in 767 days


#4 posted 10-09-2015 12:23 PM

I would say the largest is a spindle roughing gouge and the two smaller spindle gouges. Most of the time the roughing gouge is straight and spindle gouges are swept back somewhat. Here is a link to Thompson tools, take a look at the spindle gouges for an average sweepback.
http://www.thompsonlathetools.com/tooltype.asp?TYPE=S
To show why they are different here are two videos by John Lucas. You will note the different uses of the two gouge styles.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h8YYYYA-6jQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lfZsH-Xprtg

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1886 posts in 1600 days


#5 posted 10-09-2015 12:34 PM

Well looks like you have a killer lathe and tools, make sure wear face shield before proceeding to assault that piece of wood.
Here is a picture of finger nail ground Sorby continental gouge, bevel angle approximately 45 degrees. Shape of flute may differ somewhat from what you have but basically same tool & use!

http://www.robert-sorby.co.uk/media/catalog/product/cache/1/thumbnail/600x/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/i/o/B839080_839_Continental_Spindle_Gouge_Unhandled.jpg

Both of your smaller gouges also use for roughing and long gentle curves. You can turn coves with them too!
Good luck with it.

-- Bill

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 642 days


#6 posted 10-09-2015 12:42 PM

All the turners I know grind their own profile on what they call detail gouges. In your case it would be the two smaller gouges.

You can purchase a Wolverine grinding set for your slow speed grinder that will help you put the profile on them. Here is a link the Wolverine clone I purchased (scroll down the page till you get to item 7393).

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View AlanHollar's profile

AlanHollar

9 posts in 427 days


#7 posted 10-09-2015 01:25 PM

Always bear in mind that the largest of the tools, the roughing gouge, is more properly called a spindle roughing gouge, meant to be used for spindle work only, and needing the tool rest kept pretty close to the work. Both the geometry of the tool and the thinness of the tang where it enters the handle make this tool unsafe, and unsatisfying as a bowl turning tool

View lew's profile

lew

11343 posts in 3221 days


#8 posted 10-09-2015 02:22 PM

I often find some easy to follow information from this guy-

https://www.youtube.com/user/capneddie

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1432 posts in 2228 days


#9 posted 10-09-2015 02:40 PM

Question – Where did you get the tools, what brand, are they high speed steel?

-- BOVILEXIA: The urge to moo at cows from a moving vehicle.

View patco64's profile

patco64

6 posts in 427 days


#10 posted 10-09-2015 10:17 PM

I don’t know what brand they are there is no markings at all, but I bought them at a garage sale a set of 8 for 5 dollars and figured I would have to temper them. So far there is no need that piece of wood on the lathe was an 8×8x9 square cedar block and I rounded it with the roughing gouge to a 7in cylinder and it kept an edge.

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1432 posts in 2228 days


#11 posted 10-10-2015 05:06 PM

IF they are HSS they DO NOT require tempering. Please find a local woodturning club/individual to determine what type steel the tools are – or – if there is a Woodcraft Store in your vicinity, they can help.

-- BOVILEXIA: The urge to moo at cows from a moving vehicle.

View HumidorMinister's profile

HumidorMinister

412 posts in 2849 days


#12 posted 10-10-2015 07:48 PM

Is this the grind you are speaking of? Here’s a link to Glaser Hitec,maker of the tool above. Lots of good info here.
http://www.glaserhitec.com/shop/

-- What you listen to is your business...what you hear is ours.

View patco64's profile

patco64

6 posts in 427 days


#13 posted 10-11-2015 01:30 AM

yes thats the grind. I started doing that on the smallest one and I probably will do it to the middle one also.
Also with the spark pattern and the fact that the ones I have used kept a good edge I’m sure they are HSS.
Now that my wood is round and I increase the speed I need to make a live center on my tailstock.

I like making the stuff to make stuff,more than I like making stuff.

View HumidorMinister's profile

HumidorMinister

412 posts in 2849 days


#14 posted 10-13-2015 04:23 PM

This is known as the Elsworth grind. David Elsworth created this grind and it has become probably the most used in the biz. Tormek makes a jig that will produce this grind repeatedly perfect. I don’t remember the part number but I use it and it works perfectly every time.

-- What you listen to is your business...what you hear is ours.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1886 posts in 1600 days


#15 posted 10-13-2015 06:59 PM

Which came first, “Irish Grind form Liam O’Neil & Michael O’Donnell, or Ellsworth Grind”?

-- Bill

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