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Does anyone know about electrolysis rust removal?

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Forum topic by daddywoofdawg posted 10-08-2015 07:10 PM 791 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1036 days


10-08-2015 07:10 PM

Does anyone know about electrolysis rust removal? I have a question.
I have set-up a electrolysis tank and did everything,have good connections etc.My charger is set for 10 amps,but the gauge is reading about 2-3 amps,I’m getting bubbles but faintly (very little).
My question is: Is it normal to get such a low amp reading?


11 replies so far

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MrUnix

4208 posts in 1660 days


#1 posted 10-08-2015 07:16 PM

Normal… the current draw is directly related to the concentration of electrolyte and distance between cathode and anode.. move them closer or add more washing soda and you get higher current. I usually shoot for a 1 amp draw, maybe 2. The bubbles generated are not big… it will make a ‘froth’ on top of the water. If you want big bubbles, google “HHO generator” :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1036 days


#2 posted 10-08-2015 08:38 PM

I’m doing this in a five Gal bucket,and it seems on youtube the bubbles are like it’s simmering,but I’m not seeing that.I’m using 1+ tablespoon per gal.

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ColonelTravis

1189 posts in 1355 days


#3 posted 10-08-2015 08:46 PM

You’re not going to get a cauldron. Just did a couple plane soles in a 5 gallon bucket. Used 1/2 cup A&H washing soda, left them in there for a few days, got everything off just fine. Meter started at 6, then went to 4, then 2 and was down around 1 most the time – steady, tiny bubbling that diminishes the longer it’s in there.

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daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1036 days


#4 posted 10-08-2015 08:55 PM

ok just wanted to make sure to was working right.never went higher than 2-3 amps

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ColonelTravis

1189 posts in 1355 days


#5 posted 10-08-2015 09:04 PM

Oh yeah you’re fine. Not sure what you’re working on but the one thing I’ve never figured out, after using electrolysis, is how to prevent flash rusting when I take it out. I’ve used a heat gun immediately in the hot sun and it still doesn’t stop it. Sometimes I get more, sometimes less, but I always get some. I have to use my fake Dremel and a wire wheel. It’s a little tedious but everything comes off and the parts are pristine.

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MrUnix

4208 posts in 1660 days


#6 posted 10-08-2015 09:23 PM

Not sure what you re working on but the one thing I’ve never figured out, after using electrolysis, is how to prevent flash rusting when I take it out. I’ve used a heat gun immediately in the hot sun and it still doesn’t stop it. Sometimes I get more, sometimes less, but I always get some. I have to use my fake Dremel and a wire wheel. It s a little tedious but everything comes off and the parts are pristine.

- ColonelTravis

Flash rust can be minimized by an immediate rinse/scrub in fresh water, followed by drying and then a surface treatment of a dilute phosphoric acid solution. Wipe it on, let it sit for a minute or two, then wipe dry. I get the gallon jugs at the borg and mix that roughly 50/50 with distilled water, and keep it in a little spray bottle.

Once treated, if the part is going to be painted, prime it as soon as possible. If it’s to be left bare, wax it.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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hhhopks

645 posts in 1838 days


#7 posted 10-08-2015 11:54 PM

Most basic battery charger has an automatic sequence such that it will start out with a higher voltage and gradually reduced incrementally. Toward the end of the charging cycle it is just trigger charging the battery.

-- I'll be a woodworker when I grow up. HHHOPKS

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Aj2

687 posts in 1259 days


#8 posted 10-09-2015 05:32 AM

At lest your getting bubbles,I tryed I onec and nothing happen after several days of watching videos.I gave up and Figuerd my parts weren’t rusty enough or the charger was too small.

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ColonelTravis

1189 posts in 1355 days


#9 posted 10-09-2015 07:54 AM

Thanks for the tip, Brad. I use electrolysis to remove paint, and not all of it is ever dissolved off in the bucket or whatnot, so when I take the part out I start scraping/brushing it/etc. I’ve done that instead of rinse. My last two only had light flash rust, one time I had it all over. It’s all cast iron, interesting how it varies.

DWD – sorry, didn’t mean to hijack your topic here.

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DavidOveracre

30 posts in 434 days


#10 posted 10-10-2015 03:18 PM

I’d think 1tbsp per gallon is not enough. I just dump baking soda in till I feel like it’s enough. It’s just an electrolyte, if you were to use a distilled water it wouldn’t work at all! I will say that the “line of site” rule suggests that you need to have anodes all around the piece in order for as many angles of “sight” are available. And as someone said already, the closer the better. Just be careful about touching the anode and cathode, I’ve never done it but can imagine the affect on all that hydrogen gas! After you take it out you need to at least rinse, which I don’t see why anyone wouldn’t as you need to remove the black leftovers on the surface. I scrub my stuff with a brass brush under running water. I wouldn’t fiddle with acid mixes, just me. After that, I’ve heard of people heating their pieces in the oven in order to get ALL of the moisture out of the pores of castings. I rub mine down with mineral oil when I’m done scrubbing them clean. Haven’t had any problems.

-- Dave O.

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Tim

3110 posts in 1422 days


#11 posted 10-10-2015 04:36 PM



Oh yeah you re fine. Not sure what you re working on but the one thing I ve never figured out, after using electrolysis, is how to prevent flash rusting when I take it out. I ve used a heat gun immediately in the hot sun and it still doesn t stop it. Sometimes I get more, sometimes less, but I always get some. I have to use my fake Dremel and a wire wheel. It s a little tedious but everything comes off and the parts are pristine.

- ColonelTravis

Lots of good info for the original question, so I’ll respond to yours.

Washing soda is high ph (basic) so causes flash rusting similar to the way vinegar or other acids do. A rinse in a dilute acid then clean water should help a lot, then either the heat gun or spray it with WD-40 to get the water off. I wipe the WD-40 off right away. Some people say just leave the WD-40 on, but I figure it still has the water that it has displaced from the metal so I want to wipe that up then wipe another oil on as needed.

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