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Tension cable between two wall studs - to hang acoustic panels

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Forum topic by composermark posted 10-08-2015 03:44 PM 601 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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composermark

1 post in 425 days


10-08-2015 03:44 PM

Hey

Sorry this is my first post – so if I’m doing something wrong, I apologize and will learn.

So I’m trying to mount some acoustical panels on the ceiling in a tower block condo. Ceiling and floors concrete – but I’m not too clear on the structure between units. Anyway, we own, but I’m really hoping to avoid drilling into the ceiling to mount hooks – in case it is as complicated as I imagine.

However the walls are drywall with studs. So my idea is to run two tensioned cables between two sides of the room – anchored through the studs. And then suspend these 3-4 panels (at weight 10lbs each).

So I figure each anchor/stud (4 of them) would have to support at least 20lbs lateral or vector force.

I know studs can take the static weight of large TV screens – even ones that are on extendable arms. So I imagine this realatively small force won’t present a problem. So long as I promise not to swing on the cables.

But I appreciate if anyone can see this solution for suspending some acoustic panels might be a bad idea for some reason.

Oh, it’s a 9 foot ceiling in case you were wondering.

-- Mark, Los Angeles.


8 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3551 posts in 1230 days


#1 posted 10-08-2015 03:50 PM

Why not hang them like a picture frame, each on a stud? Your plan should pose no structural concerns.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2101 days


#2 posted 10-08-2015 06:36 PM

If the cable is tensioned and then weights hung from it, the force (tension) in the cable due to the suspended weights will be related to the deflection angle. The more deflection you allow in the cable, the less force (tension) will be produced by hanging weight from it.

The force multiplier will be (I think) 1 / sin(deflection angle).

So, if the angle at the wall anchor is 5 degrees, the tension force will be about 11.5 times half the weight suspended (because there are 2 anchors). If deflection is 2 degrees, the multiplier will be approximately 26.7 times half the suspended weight.

If the anchors are near the ceiling, this force can be more easily transferred into the top plate of the wall than if they were positioned lower.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1184 days


#3 posted 10-08-2015 07:30 PM

If you’re planning on running the anchors axially in line with the cable, they had better be anchored very well. It is theoretically possible, but realistically impossible to keep the cable perfectly straight, so plan on some sagging, how much is acceptable for your installation? Most of the force on wall anchors from flat screen TV’s is in shear, your application would be exclusively in tension and as a result would require more robust anchoring (think trying to pull a nail from a board sideways vs. straight out).

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2101 days


#4 posted 10-08-2015 07:42 PM



If you re planning on running the anchors axially in line with the cable, they had better be anchored very well. It is theoretically possible, but realistically impossible to keep the cable perfectly straight, so plan on some sagging,
- bigblockyeti

To not sag would require infinite tension in the cable.

-Paul

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 693 days


#5 posted 10-08-2015 07:49 PM

These. Love them and they can take the weight.

http://www.monkeyhook.com/

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View Hammerthumb's profile

Hammerthumb

2533 posts in 1438 days


#6 posted 10-08-2015 07:55 PM

What type of building is this? Is the substrate for the level above concrete on metal pan? Are the wall studs wood, or metal. As you have stated that it is a tower block condo, I would think it is concrete on metal pan for the ceiling substrate, and metal studs for the walls. Metal studs would require reinforced blocking to hold the weight. How much weight are you talking about?

-- Paul, Las Vegas

View Daruc's profile

Daruc

459 posts in 595 days


#7 posted 10-08-2015 08:47 PM

Just use a hammer drill and mount anchors to the concrete ceiling. It’s not hard.

-- -

View putty's profile

putty

998 posts in 1069 days


#8 posted 10-08-2015 08:59 PM

Go to an insulation supply house, they will have insulation hangers that you can epoxy to the concrete, then stab your acoustic panels on them and use the clip to hold them in place.

-- Putty

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