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Carbide End Mills

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Forum topic by jayvansickle posted 10-08-2015 05:22 AM 555 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jayvansickle

16 posts in 539 days


10-08-2015 05:22 AM

I just came in to possession of several 1/2 and 1/4 solid carbide end mills. These are for machining of titanium, stainless steel, and chrome kobalt. Has anybody out there had any experience with using end mills on there router table? I would appreciate any feedback.

-- If a parsley farmer goes broke, can they garnish his wages


8 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3938 posts in 1956 days


#1 posted 10-08-2015 11:16 AM

I have, though mine wasn’t carbide. They work quite well but in my case it seemed to dull quite quickly in particle board….can’t remember why I would route that stuff. I’ve seen posts where some guys recommend end mills as opposed to buying those expensive spiral router bits.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 694 days


#2 posted 10-08-2015 11:22 AM

You need 2 flute endmills for wood. In my experience this allows it to throw chips better with no clogging. I have used 1/2” ball nose 2 flute on wood and it works very well. If you use 4 flute I am afraid you will have to slow the RPMs down quite a bit, assuming it would even work at all without burning.

Yes, they are quite cheaper and I would do it again.

Endmills come like this:
2 and 3 flute for nonferrous metals. These would work well in wood. (3 flute for aluminum is a great endmill).
4 flute for ferrous metals. I wouldnt use them in wood.

This is not a full picture on endmills. I am sure there could be 5 flute, I just have never seen them.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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Redman1

9 posts in 440 days


#3 posted 10-08-2015 11:50 AM

2 flute 1/2” shank carbide end mills should work quite well for you. Personally I would not use a 1/4” shank carbide end mill in a large router, too easy to break. You shouldn’t need any more that 2 flutes for wood, more cutting edges contribute to a smoother cut among other things in metal. As for end mills with more than 4 flutes, yes they are made. I have frequently used 6 flute HSS end mills up to 2 1/2” diameter in my machinist career.

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splintergroup

828 posts in 685 days


#4 posted 10-08-2015 06:09 PM

End mills (both HSS and carbide) work well for most woods, although their cutting profile is not optimum. Their advantage is they may be cheaper than a ‘wood’ router bit equivalent.

Be aware that mills with >2 flutes are often not for ‘plunging’. That is, if the tip is not configured like a drill bit, you should not attempt to plunge cut these into the wood, side cutting only.

View jayvansickle's profile

jayvansickle

16 posts in 539 days


#5 posted 10-09-2015 04:18 AM

I guessed I should of said upfront I have been in machining all my adult life as well as a CNC Programmer for 23 years. My fear was the cutting geometry of the end mills would not want to cut wood and possibly even brake. The thought of a carbide end mill braking off at 20,000 rpm is a little scary. I did get a couple of Data Flute end mills and I have used them a great deal machining of titanium and chrome cobalt. They are great end mills. I feel somewhat relieved to know that others have used them without catastrophic failure. Thank you one and all. If you have any suggestions on what kind of surface speed to run I know how to calculate the rpm. If anybody out there would like to know how to do the calculations feel free to ask.

-- If a parsley farmer goes broke, can they garnish his wages

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newwoodbutcher

552 posts in 2313 days


#6 posted 10-09-2015 05:19 AM

I can’t recall where but I’ve reticently read a recommendation from a published ww for a machinist 4 flute end mill to cut mortises. I just received mine in the mail today. I’ll let you all know how it works out in a couple of days.

-- Ken

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jayvansickle

16 posts in 539 days


#7 posted 10-09-2015 05:22 AM

Thanks. I got mine from a tool salesman where I work. Asked him if he had any end mills they wanted to get rid of. To my surprise he said yes and loaded me down with a bunch of freebies.

-- If a parsley farmer goes broke, can they garnish his wages

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Redman1

9 posts in 440 days


#8 posted 10-09-2015 06:33 PM



I guessed I should of said upfront I have been in machining all my adult life as well as a CNC Programmer for 23 years. My fear was the cutting geometry of the end mills would not want to cut wood and possibly even brake. The thought of a carbide end mill braking off at 20,000 rpm is a little scary…........ If you have any suggestions on what kind of surface speed to run I know how to calculate the rpm. If anybody out there would like to know how to do the calculations feel free to ask.

- jayvansickle


Well you probably know that an end mill that doesn’t have a center drill in the cutting end can be center cutting. I always used 2 flute end mills for plunging in metal, never tried a 4 flute though I did learn how to sharpen a center cutting 4 flute mill – 45 yrs ago. SFM for an end mill, I don’t know, think about a 7 1/4” or 8” non-carbide saw blade at 4000 RPM. What SFM? Learned the calc. during my apprenticeship and promptly forgot when tool salesmen gave me those cardboard calculators. Let’s see, probably around 3000 SFM for 8” diameter. Maybe around 18000 RPM for 1/2 dia. For carbide, fast as the machine will run for 1/2 diameter. How’d I do?

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