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How Strong Of An Impact Driver Do I need?

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Forum topic by wmgworks posted 10-07-2015 07:48 PM 982 views 0 times favorited 37 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wmgworks

193 posts in 449 days


10-07-2015 07:48 PM

I think one of hte tools I want to add to my list in a hurry is an impact driver. Most of my projects will be smaller probably. I will be building a loft in the garage later, but most of my work will be on small boxy stuff for now I imagine. When looking at impact drivers (and all cordless tools henestly) you always se 12v, 18v, 20v and varying hp. Would I be OK with a 12v? My funds are really limited so I need to be price conscious and no just buy something bigger just because.

Thanks!

-- Butchering wood since 2015


37 replies so far

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Richard

1898 posts in 2154 days


#1 posted 10-07-2015 07:59 PM

I have a 20 volt Dewalt that 1/4” drive that I love , It has much more power than any of my friends 12 volt units regardless of brand.

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ste6168

250 posts in 635 days


#2 posted 10-07-2015 08:05 PM

I have the Milwaukee 12v, I love how light it is, and it is awesome for around the shop stuff, but if I were building a deck (or similar) and driving hundreds of screws, I would a longer lasting battery. Ive never had a lack of power, honestly.

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wmgworks

193 posts in 449 days


#3 posted 10-07-2015 08:08 PM

So if you had two drivers where the hp was the same but the voltage was different, the only difference would be how long the battery lasts?

-- Butchering wood since 2015

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waho6o9

7172 posts in 2040 days


#4 posted 10-07-2015 08:09 PM

Milwaukee Fuel 18v will cover all that you need.

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Fred Hargis

3938 posts in 1957 days


#5 posted 10-07-2015 08:12 PM

If you have other cordless tools, consider buying one that might use the same batteries. My only exposure to the cordless impacts was recently when I got to use a friend’s Bosch and Milwaukee (both 12V) side by side. The Milwaukee was a much quicker driving 6” screws through a 4×4 into the 2x deck of my trailer….the Bosch was no slotch, though. I’d be happy with either but if I lay down my own shekels, it will probably be the Milwaukee.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2707 days


#6 posted 10-07-2015 08:18 PM

I have a Bosch 12V impact driver and I can drive 1/4” lag bolts with it.

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wmgworks

193 posts in 449 days


#7 posted 10-07-2015 08:23 PM



If you have other cordless tools, consider buying one that might use the same batteries. My only exposure to the cordless impacts was recently when I got to use a friend s Bosch and Milwaukee (both 12V) side by side. The Milwaukee was a much quicker driving 6” screws through a 4×4 into the 2x deck of my trailer….the Bosch was no slotch, though. I d be happy with either but if I lay down my own shekels, it will probably be the Milwaukee.

- Fred Hargis

The only cordless thing I own is a 20+ year old Makita drill. I’m not brand loyal as of right now. Money is super tight right now, and I am starting out with almost nothing in the way of tools. I’m looking to buy mostly used to save some money, so I will have to jump on whatever is available. But I don’t want to end up buying something that isn’t powerful enough for what I will need it for. Hence the original question

-- Butchering wood since 2015

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ste6168

250 posts in 635 days


#8 posted 10-07-2015 08:26 PM



So if you had two drivers where the hp was the same but the voltage was different, the only difference would be how long the battery lasts?

- wmgworks

I can’t answer that, but I know if I drop my 12v into “low” gear, its got way more torque than I could ever see myself needing. That battery doesn’t last forever. Luckily, I have both the impact driver, and drill, 4 batteries, and 2 chargers. I am always ready!

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frosty50

46 posts in 1811 days


#9 posted 10-07-2015 08:43 PM

I have the Milwaukee 12V and 18V Makita, depending on what I am doing determines which I use. The majority of the time it is the 12V Milwaukee. Light weight, easy to fit in tighter spaces and plenty of power. Recommend at least one extra battery on the 12V, they recharge within an hour. Same for the Makita. When putting up a ledger for my deck, I use both and had no problems with either tool. Same when I did my fence. I use the Milwaukee in my shop all the time due to its size and portability, and it has handle every task without problems. I use it more than the drill driver that came in the set. Great for putting face frames together. I especially like the battery indicator on the side of the impact. When only one of the four lights is lite, I know immediately to change the battery. I always have a least one extra fully charged battery ready to go. I got the Milwaukee set on sale at the big orange store for $99, and it came with the drill/driver, impact, charger and 2 batteries. I purchase a set of 2 extra batteries when they went on sale for $69 or $79. I like spares batteries incase one in the charger is now fully charge, I always have a spare that is. I do this for the Makita also. I do not like the Bosch, I have had problems with them. My maintenance staff all have 18V DeWalt and they get a work out.

-- frosty

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wmgworks

193 posts in 449 days


#10 posted 10-07-2015 08:54 PM



I have the Milwaukee 12V and 18V Makita, depending on what I am doing determines which I use. The majority of the time it is the 12V Milwaukee. Light weight, easy to fit in tighter spaces and plenty of power. Recommend at least one extra battery on the 12V, they recharge within an hour. Same for the Makita. When putting up a ledger for my deck, I use both and had no problems with either tool. Same when I did my fence. I use the Milwaukee in my shop all the time due to its size and portability, and it has handle every task without problems. I use it more than the drill driver that came in the set. Great for putting face frames together. I especially like the battery indicator on the side of the impact. When only one of the four lights is lite, I know immediately to change the battery. I always have a least one extra fully charged battery ready to go. I got the Milwaukee set on sale at the big orange store for $99, and it came with the drill/driver, impact, charger and 2 batteries. I purchase a set of 2 extra batteries when they went on sale for $69 or $79. I like spares batteries incase one in the charger is now fully charge, I always have a spare that is. I do this for the Makita also. I do not like the Bosch, I have had problems with them. My maintenance staff all have 18V DeWalt and they get a work out.

- frosty50

Frosty50, that was a perfect example and explanation! I won’t be doing much construction – mostly woodworking projects. And I agree about having extra batteries around. It sounds like a 12v unit would work perfect for me. Thanks!

-- Butchering wood since 2015

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JayT

4778 posts in 1674 days


#11 posted 10-07-2015 09:12 PM



So if you had two drivers where the hp was the same but the voltage was different, the only difference would be how long the battery lasts?

- wmgworks

Yes, if the torque ratings are the same, then the only difference is run time.

I have a first generation M12 impact and it does everything I’ve asked of it. I’ve driven everything from 3/4in wood screws up to 3/8 lags with no issues (predrilled holes, of course). For woodworking and light construction you don’t need anything more than one of the quality 12V offerings that are out there.

When we remodeled our kitchen a few years ago, I got to talking with the installer about tools. He was using 12V drill and impact driver at that time and really liked them. Was far happier with them because of size and weight than his previous 18V tools.

With any cordless tool, having that extra battery is a good thing and the 12V batteries charge faster than I can run them down during normal use, so you don’t have to have a bunch of extras.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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ForestGrl

445 posts in 549 days


#12 posted 10-07-2015 10:13 PM

IMHO, if you get an 18V, you’ll be set and not run short. We used the Makita to build a deck out of Ipe, and it was still young when we finished. If you get a 12V, you may end up having to buy a bigger one down the road. If you can wait until the holiday sales start (perhaps borrow one in the meantime?) you can probably get this Ryobi set $99.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

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retfr8flyr

327 posts in 1132 days


#13 posted 10-07-2015 10:27 PM

If you are limited in your budget I would get the Milwaukee M18 Fuel impact driver. It will be able to handle anything you can throw at it and is still small enough to get into tight places. If you think you could add an additional tool later on then I would get an M12 Fuel impact driver for now and add the M18 if you run into things the M12 wont handle. The new M12 Fuel brushless tools are as powerful as some brands 18v offerings. The M12 Fuels can easily handle about 95% of anything you will encounter and are the best bang for your buck currently available.

-- Earl

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CharlesA

3022 posts in 1261 days


#14 posted 10-07-2015 10:39 PM

i have a 20v Max driver for working on the deck, etc, but I like to use my 12v (Bosch) for fine work. It can drive in anything I need it to and I can control the screw much more precisely.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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jonah

687 posts in 2762 days


#15 posted 10-07-2015 11:37 PM

If you can wait a month or so, the 12V combo kits with a drill and impact driver are nearly always on sale for the holidays. The Milwaukee kit was a bit above $100 last year, and the Bosch 12V kit was $100 IIRC. Either would service you just fine.

The best combo of hand held power tools, IMO, is 12V cordless tools and corded drills/impact drivers for when you need tons of power. I wish I’d bought the Milwaukee 12V kit instead of my Ridgid 18V kit, honestly. And I like my Ridgid stuff, its just much bigger and heavier than the 12V tools.

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