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Forum topic by splinterking posted 10-07-2015 07:10 PM 1015 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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splinterking

67 posts in 1498 days


10-07-2015 07:10 PM

Hi all,

I’m have a profile in mind for the edge of a round tabletop for a side table I’m working on. The problem is I can’t figure out how to do this. It’s a fairly large profile. I’ve inserted a pic below that shows a silhouette of what I’m envisioning. If the top was square I could do it like a raised panel on the table saw to remove the bulk and then use hand planes, rasps and sand paper to round it as picture. However the circular nature of this top eliminates the table saw and I’m not sure how consistent a rasp would be going around. The only thing else I can think of is some type of panel raising router bit with a bearing, but I really don’t want to drop $75+ on a bit for this particular piece. So any ideas would be appreciated.

22” wide x .875” thick.

-- "Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society." ~Mark Twain


19 replies so far

View Ripthorn's profile

Ripthorn

1406 posts in 2446 days


#1 posted 10-07-2015 07:19 PM

For a profile that large there aren’t a lot of options other than the router bit. If it’s a one off, you might be able to take it to a cabinet shop and have them run it through their shaper, but it might not be any less than the router bit. Alternatively, 22” round is such that some lathes could swing it on the outboard side.

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

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Richard

1898 posts in 2151 days


#2 posted 10-07-2015 07:24 PM



For a profile that large there aren t a lot of options other than the router bit. If it s a one off, you might be able to take it to a cabinet shop and have them run it through their shaper, but it might not be any less than the router bit. Alternatively, 22” round is such that some lathes could swing it on the outboard side.

- Ripthorn


Yep , router Bit or a Lathe is my only idea as well.

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DIYaholic

19172 posts in 2136 days


#3 posted 10-07-2015 07:31 PM

A quick google search returned this….

http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/33189/video-clever-sled-for-curved-bevels-on-the-tablesaw

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

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splinterking

67 posts in 1498 days


#4 posted 10-07-2015 07:51 PM

Hey thanks for the link. I had done a couple searches myself and didn’t come up with that. I’d had a similar scheme in mind, but couldn’t figure out a safe, accurate way to do it.

-- "Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society." ~Mark Twain

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1830 days


#5 posted 10-07-2015 07:51 PM

If you had a long straight bit for the router, you could make a jig that held the router registered at an angle to the table top. Walk the router/jig around the table top, then finish it off with planes/rasps/files.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16241 posts in 3679 days


#6 posted 10-07-2015 07:54 PM

If I didn’t want to drop the money on a large router bit, I’d do it by hand with an orbital sander. Start off with 60-grit paper to hog off material fairly quickly, and progress to finer grits. If you keep the sander moving around the perimeter without lingering in one place too long, it’s not as hard as you might think to achieve uniformity.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1812 days


#7 posted 10-07-2015 08:58 PM

You could do it w/ an angle grinder and a Kutzall disc to hog off most of the waste then fine tune w/ a rasp and sandpaper. The key is careful layout, first mark the edge w/ a marking gauge then scribe a circle on the bottom edge stay wide of those lines with the Kutzall and finish up w/ hand tools.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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crank49

3980 posts in 2431 days


#8 posted 10-08-2015 01:22 AM

That table saw jig looked like the way to go.
Too bad the finished side of the top has to rest on the fence.
Otherwise you could put a pin in the center to rotate the table top past the saw blade.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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splinterking

67 posts in 1498 days


#9 posted 10-08-2015 03:13 AM

Yeah crack49 I agree the table saw jig looks good and my first line of thought was to use the hole left from cutting the top on the bandsaw to cut the bevel somehow, but like you said it just faces the wrong way. I think if I do the FWW jig and the round and refine it it with hand tools and/or a ROS then I’ll get it.

I appreciate all the input from everyone.

-- "Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society." ~Mark Twain

View Logan Windram's profile

Logan Windram

303 posts in 1922 days


#10 posted 10-08-2015 03:53 AM

Shaper, build a jig so you can spin that top upright against a helical tilted flush bit. I have a pic of someone doing it, I will dig it up and post

View wunderaa's profile

wunderaa

243 posts in 1663 days


#11 posted 10-08-2015 11:15 AM

Finishing the same thing today. Mark your lines around the circumference and use a trusty foreplane to get down to the lines. It’s not as easy as straight lines but quicker than sanding and more controlled than routing.

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 691 days


#12 posted 10-08-2015 11:25 AM

A shaper with insert tooling. Custom grind your cutter. weigh it and place a similar counter weight blank on the oppisite side. Think panel raiser. Also, you may be able to find a shaper cutter similar.

This assumes you have a shaper at your disposal.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

2880 posts in 2988 days


#13 posted 10-08-2015 12:33 PM



Finishing the same thing today. Mark your lines around the circumference and use a trusty foreplane to get down to the lines. It s not as easy as straight lines but quicker than sanding and more controlled than routing.

- wunderaa

This is my opinion too.

I made three shaker pedestal tables with a similar profile on the round top. Using planes was very enjoyable, very satisfying, and not all that difficult. Be sure to mind the grain direction as you work your way around the circumference.

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

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wunderaa

243 posts in 1663 days


#14 posted 10-09-2015 03:02 AM



This is my opinion too.

I made three shaker pedestal tables with a similar profile on the round top. Using planes was very enjoyable, very satisfying, and not all that difficult. Be sure to mind the grain direction as you work your way around the circumference.

- ChuckV


Excellent point, as I omitted that one! The grain will constantly change as you go. However, I’ll be done shaping with the plane well before anyone gets their router or shaper jigged up. ;)

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gwilki

121 posts in 934 days


#15 posted 10-11-2015 01:09 AM

You could use the table saw jig idea, but attach a waste block to the face of the table top with turner’s tape. Put a T nut in the waste block, run a bolt though the upright of the jig into the T nut and rotate the top through the blade.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

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