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Preventing a door from closing "too far" for a full inset

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Forum topic by Bob Areddy posted 12-03-2009 05:54 PM 1286 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bob Areddy

177 posts in 2092 days


12-03-2009 05:54 PM

So I built some cabinets for my bar in the basement, full inset, face frame application. I used blum hinges which autoclose. They work great (super easy to adjust so the door is perfect in the face frame). However, the door closes farther than the face frame, so I need to install some cleats.

What’s the preferred location for the cleats: bottom, top, bottom & top, or side?

-- --Bob http://www.areddy.net/wood


13 replies so far

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Peter Oxley

1426 posts in 2564 days


#1 posted 12-03-2009 06:00 PM

Top for me – it’s out of the way.

-- http://www.peteroxley.com -- http://north40studios.etsy.com --

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a1Jim

112326 posts in 2267 days


#2 posted 12-03-2009 06:11 PM

Hey Eddy
Some folks put stops in there inset doors at the top and some folks build there face frame so part of the cabinet box sticks up at the bottom making a stop for doors . Since there already made you could just add a strip of wood along the latch side on the inside of the stile as a stop with nails or small screws or even glue it on.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Bob Areddy

177 posts in 2092 days


#3 posted 12-03-2009 08:33 PM

So wherever I put it, it’s generally accepted that it goes across the entire width (or height) of the opening?

If I put it only at the top, will the door still close so that it’s straight? (i.e. the bottom not bowing inward because there’s no cleat there….)

-- --Bob http://www.areddy.net/wood

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a1Jim

112326 posts in 2267 days


#4 posted 12-03-2009 08:44 PM

I would get as much stop as possible so the side stop on the stile would work best. The stop does not need to be big and conspicuous it can be say 1” to 1 1/4” wide by 1/4” thick and only have 1/4”give or take sticking out from behind the stile of your face frame and stained the same color of course. I’ve seen people mount magnetic catches top and bottom as stops also. But that mt affect your autoclose. Now that I think of it your auto close my have an adjustment that will take care of it.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Bob Areddy

177 posts in 2092 days


#5 posted 12-04-2009 04:38 PM

I strung them vertically for the entire distance of the opening, sticking out about 1/4”. Thanks for the advice, worked great!

-- --Bob http://www.areddy.net/wood

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a1Jim

112326 posts in 2267 days


#6 posted 12-04-2009 06:49 PM

Your welcome I’m glad it worked out Eddy

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Bob Areddy

177 posts in 2092 days


#7 posted 12-04-2009 10:24 PM

Not my name, but that’s cool :-)

-- --Bob http://www.areddy.net/wood

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a1Jim

112326 posts in 2267 days


#8 posted 12-04-2009 10:31 PM

Sorry about that sometimes I see a name as part of a posters LJ Identity and make assumptions.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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SEE

119 posts in 1857 days


#9 posted 12-05-2009 02:00 AM

I’m planning a small cabinet that will have this same challenge. I’ve been wanting to build a door catch in the James Krenov style where he used a spring from a ball point pen and small pieces of wood for the catch. Has anyone built one these door catches for inset doors. They appear to be fun to make!

Does anyone know of a source for the hinges that Mr Krenov most often used?

-- Build for the joy of it!

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a1Jim

112326 posts in 2267 days


#10 posted 12-05-2009 03:20 AM

Hi SEE
Yes I’ve used ball catches I’d forgot all about them when giving rareddy Ideas. There fairly easy to use but when you drill the hole for the catch you can come out the side of the door in your not careful . They usually have good instructions on how to install them.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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SEE

119 posts in 1857 days


#11 posted 12-06-2009 02:26 AM

Hey Jim,

These catches that I’m referring to that Krenov made are made of wood and spring robbed from a ball point pen. So, they’re not like the traditional ball catches. In fact, I don’t think there’s even a bolt/screw that mounts to the door. I saw in it his book, The Fine Art of Cabinetmaking.

They’ve very nice hand made catches but would not be practical for production work.

-- Build for the joy of it!

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a1Jim

112326 posts in 2267 days


#12 posted 12-06-2009 02:33 AM

I think I have that book I guess I didn’t remember reading that. why not give it a go maybe on a practice piece first.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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paulburch

33 posts in 1285 days


#13 posted 03-11-2013 09:41 PM

ha bob this krenov style catch you are referring to is actualy 2 parts, the piece you are referring to is the stop part,the spring appears to offer some resistance as this part is mounted at the top. At the bottom is a dowel drilled into the base and left proud and softly rounded over and tweeked to drag on the bottom of the door to hold it in place
http://paulburchellwoodworking.com/

-- paul burchell

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