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350 grit CBN wheel -- any thoughts?

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Forum topic by soob posted 10-06-2015 03:31 PM 1111 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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soob

223 posts in 671 days


10-06-2015 03:31 PM

I am considering the Wood Turners Wonders 350-grit wheel. It’d just be for resharpening, not shaping, so I figure why not? Sounds like it would save some steel at the very least.

But I’ve never used a high-grit wheel like that before. Do they wear out faster, take too long to sharpen, work poorly for some tools (other than scrapers, I know that), etc.?


15 replies so far

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3125 days


#1 posted 10-06-2015 03:39 PM

I use their 180-grit wheel for sharpening and the 80-grit for shaping. You will be spending a lot more sharpening with a 350-grit wheel … it just won’t take off steel as fast as a lower-grit wheel.

I did this review … http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/3742 ... on Ken Rizza’s CBN wheels almost two years ago. They have held up great and I am still happy as a clam and would buy the same wheels again today.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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waho6o9

7172 posts in 2039 days


#2 posted 10-06-2015 04:08 PM

Thank you for shortening the learning curve Gerry!

View BasementShop's profile

BasementShop

69 posts in 762 days


#3 posted 10-06-2015 05:41 PM

Another source if you need to compare prices: https://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/p/174/5784/Raptor-8%22-CBN-Fine-Sharpening-Wheel-with-Arbor-Bushing The specs state you can get them in two different grit ranges.

The turners swear by these.

I’d be remiss if I didn’t remind you that they are made to operate a slower RPM and you may want to think twice about spinning them too fast.

View Arlin Eastman's profile

Arlin Eastman

3553 posts in 2023 days


#4 posted 10-06-2015 06:06 PM

I use the 80g white wheel for shaping the tools and the 400 CBN for sharpening and it works great and does a really great edge and I would do it again and got it from the same person you are talking about plug guaranteed for life.

-- Please help me help other Vets click..> http://www.gofundme.com/m1abko.....It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

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Wildwood

1882 posts in 1597 days


#5 posted 10-06-2015 07:35 PM

Not sure need a wheel finer than 180. Once get over 180 with finer wheels merely burnishing or polishing the bevel not sharpening.

http://woodturnerswonders.com/collections/cbn-wheels

Lot of turners use 80/180 CBN wheels while others only use one CBN wheel for resharpening and medium grit aluminum oxide wheel for repairing or changing bevels.

-- Bill

View toddbeaulieu's profile

toddbeaulieu

781 posts in 2466 days


#6 posted 10-20-2015 06:06 PM

I have an 80 and a 220. I’ve used the 80 twice for changing the profile, but the 220 is plenty aggressive in my opinion. In fact, I almost wish I had something a bit finer.

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soob

223 posts in 671 days


#7 posted 11-12-2015 11:30 PM

I got one after all.

My initial impression is very positive. It sharpens plenty fast (though it’s new and presumably cuts faster than it will after it breaks in). The edge it leaves is hardly a polish but it seems to be a marked improvement from my 150-grit white wheel.

The wheel spins true and seems to be solid. One thing I didn’t really understand going in is that the usable face is only 1” because of the 1/4” roundover on each side. But it’s not a big deal. Make sure you have washers for the wheel because it doesn’t come with them. I can use the washers that came with my grinder but not with the guard on. And they are kind of big so it’s dangerous having them exposed.

View toddbeaulieu's profile

toddbeaulieu

781 posts in 2466 days


#8 posted 11-13-2015 06:27 PM

Robo Hippy says that he’s had one for 7 years and it shows no sign of wear. If a guy who turns professionally and most likely uses it daily says that, I assume you and will have lifetime wheels.

I love my CBN setup and can’t imagine anything much better.

ps: I don’t see the exposed wheels as any more dangerous than anything else in the shop. The biggest reason for requiring the guards IMO is exploding wheels, which is not a factor with CBN wheels.

View jfoobar's profile

jfoobar

39 posts in 793 days


#9 posted 11-13-2015 10:03 PM

Likewise, do not consider CBN wheels to be dangerous. I don’t think any guards are necessary.

View soob's profile

soob

223 posts in 671 days


#10 posted 11-13-2015 10:09 PM

I meant that the washer (which is a larger diameter than the hub of the wheel) was dangerous.

Still, all things being equal, I’d rather have the guards on, if for no other reason than improving dust collection (and I know CBN wheels don’t dust as much).

View toddbeaulieu's profile

toddbeaulieu

781 posts in 2466 days


#11 posted 11-13-2015 10:42 PM

BTW, I stuck a few rare earth magnets around the grinder and on the oneway jig and they collect a lot of metal dust.

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 548 days


#12 posted 11-15-2015 03:59 AM

Most of the professional woodworkers I follow online top out at 120 grit, and many at 80 grit (and then they hone). I’m a relative newbie turner, and am still struggling with sharpening, but it seems to me that 350 would be pretty expensive overkill.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View soob's profile

soob

223 posts in 671 days


#13 posted 11-15-2015 05:48 AM

Professionals don’t always have the same calculus as hobbyists. Often they’re more concerned about doing good enough as fast and cheaply as they can. You can’t blame them for that, if they’re sharpening fifty times a day instead of 50 times a year.

That, or they rely on methods that are very skill intensive. Possibly they’re just old hat and don’t want to try anything new.

Me, I like the finer edge and slower, more forgiving cut. Plus it was the same cost as the other wheels, and not that much anyway.

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ForestGrl

445 posts in 548 days


#14 posted 11-15-2015 06:01 AM

Uhhhh, these guys aren’t selling at the local Farmer’s Market. :-/

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View brunomarcs's profile

brunomarcs

6 posts in 379 days


#15 posted 11-24-2015 01:01 AM

Ken sold me an 80 grit and a 350, the 350 is perfect, the 80 is for shaping only, you’ll eat up a brand new gouge very quickly. I’m gonna get two other ones for another set up and he has a 600 and perhaps an 800? I’ll have to check again to make sure but those would be fine. I can’t imagine using a 180 for finish sharpening but those are the grits everyone else sells so they must be good. Oh Another thing, you’ll throw away your stone wheels once you get the cbn ones.

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