LumberJocks

Thickness planer accuracy/tolerance troubles...

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by roha2236 posted 10-05-2015 03:03 PM 959 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View roha2236's profile

roha2236

28 posts in 427 days


10-05-2015 03:03 PM

I recently bought a used Delta DC380 planer and spent a fair bit of time tuning and setting it up before running anything through it. Took forever to get the head casting parallel to the bed, but I’m pleased to say it’s within 0.001”. Long story short, there is, in my opinion, far too much variance from one end of the board to the other (front to back)...over a distance of 24”. Up to 0.02”! There’s a bit of a difference left to right (up to 0.005”), which I’m sure I can fix by adjusting the knives more. What I don’t understand is what would cause the front to back variance (in order to make the correct adjustments to fix the problem).

Any thoughts?

-- Roman


12 replies so far

View Stevedore's profile (online now)

Stevedore

63 posts in 1487 days


#1 posted 10-05-2015 06:22 PM

I’m not familiar with that model, so I’m just guessing, but is whatever carriage lock it has not holding securely? Maybe letting the head rise a bit due to vibration? (assuming the board gets gradually thicker as it goes through)

-- Steve, in Morris County, NJ

View nicksmurf111's profile

nicksmurf111

361 posts in 912 days


#2 posted 10-05-2015 07:29 PM

Snipe. Adjust the infeed and outfeed roller tension . Adjust the infeed and outfeed tables. Make sure the bed is waxed. I think the outfeed table generally needs to rise by a tiny, tiny bit to tension the board against the outfeed roller. If the board you are feeding through isn’t jointed, it’s not sitting flat against the bed and that can cause issues also.

I have a Belsaw, but the Deltas have more adjustments there. I guess you can adjust the height of the infeed and outfeed rollers, the tension, AND the table rollers. I’d refer to the manual, using a dial indicator or feeler gauges, set all those height adjustments.

-- Nicholas

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2100 days


#3 posted 10-05-2015 07:34 PM

^ what nick sed. Board must be jointed.

View roha2236's profile

roha2236

28 posts in 427 days


#4 posted 10-05-2015 10:14 PM

Thanks for the replies. The board was jointed before planing, and at first my calipers were still showing a difference in thickness even beyond the section of the board affected by snipe. After taking out my trusty One Way Multigauge and checking the bed rollers, I noticed that they went out of calibration. I adjusted them to 0.001” above the table, and the issue now seems to be rectified. I had also previously loosened the tension on the infeed roller because it was leaving significant marks when I planed at the slower feed speed.

-- Roman

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

759 posts in 1861 days


#5 posted 10-05-2015 10:32 PM

roha -

I have the DC380 also and love it. Like yourself, after some careful calibration efforts it offers really superior performance. One additional tip, consider purchasing a digital planer gage from Wiley http://wixey.com/planer/index.html. It takes a little effort to mount it but makes a totally different machine of the planer. Repeatable accuracy to .001 inch is a vast improvement.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2100 days


#6 posted 10-06-2015 06:21 PM

I have the wixey digital gauge on my planer also. I would order another one in a minute if that one was broken. I wouldn’t say I get repeatable accuracy to the thousandth, but it’s within 5 thousandths.

View roha2236's profile

roha2236

28 posts in 427 days


#7 posted 10-06-2015 06:27 PM

I looked at the website for the Wixey and I don’t really see what it offers over my Mitutoyo digital calipers and One Way Milti Gauge. I creep up to my required thickness when planing, and can get good accuracy. Could someone who has the Wixey please explain the benefits?

-- Roman

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3933 posts in 1955 days


#8 posted 10-06-2015 07:49 PM

I have a Wixey on my DC380, and use it to not only control the wood thickness when I’m planing, but to plane other boards to the same thickness. To explain, if I have some face frame wood and need more, I measure what I have with my digital calipers, then plane to that number with the Wixey. Works very well, though I check the accuracy every month or so with those same calipers. If it needs recalibrated, that’s about a 5 minute job. When I’m planing boards to 3/4” or whatever, I’m not constantly stopping to measure the board as I go.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

759 posts in 1861 days


#9 posted 10-06-2015 08:11 PM

roha/Fred -

To calibrate the Wixley, run a board through the planer then raise the vertical measuring bar and place the board between the end of the bar and the lower mechanism of the gage. Remove the board and lower the measuring bar and you are calibrated. Takes less than 30 seconds.

This technique can be viewed at http://www.wixey.com/planer/how/calibration.html

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

759 posts in 1861 days


#10 posted 10-06-2015 09:34 PM

Wixley planer gage benefits :

Very accurate
Instant thickness readings
Repeatable thickness settings
Easy calibration
Fewer measurements – less chance for error
Considerable savings in time.
Eliminates “creeping up to required thickness” efforts

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

1372 posts in 1491 days


#11 posted 10-07-2015 12:45 AM

is it a constant 0.005” difference, on different species? I nailed my Jet 15” planer down to 0.001”-0.002” for beds, rollers, blades, etc. If something comes out 0.005”, I would suspect greater density of the wood piece at one end or something scientific like that. But really, does 0.005” on a piece of wood make that much of a difference in the end?

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

759 posts in 1861 days


#12 posted 10-07-2015 01:30 PM

No!, .005” makes virtually no difference at all. This is getting down to the thickness of a sheet of paper.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com