LumberJocks

Tips on moving a Ridgid R4511 table saw (heavy)

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by abehil posted 10-05-2015 02:24 AM 1130 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View abehil's profile

abehil

104 posts in 805 days


10-05-2015 02:24 AM

Topic tags/keywords: ridgid r4511 saw transport question

I’m going to be picking up a Ridgid R4511 in a couple of days.

First, I won’t be able to bring anyone else to help. The seller can help but this all has to be done without hurting either of us. I want to do this without any vertical lifts.

While I’d like to use a drop bed trailer I don’t know where to rent one.
So far I’m planning on taking a uhaul utility trailer with ramp. There seems to be two sizes, the larger is 6×12 and has a 57” ramp. It sits lower than any other trailer they have. I’m planning on rolling the saw up the ramp.
The trailer doesn’t have any type of winch but maybe, while pushing, I can put some sort of rope or strap around the saw and up to the front of the trailer and pull it tight as it goes up the ramp – just in case.
http://www.uhaul.com/Trailers/6x12-Utility-Trailer-with-Ramp-Rental/HO/

Question. Am I totally crazy thinking this might work with this particular saw?

The seller mentioned an option of removing the granite slabs and then move it.

Questions:
How difficult is it to remove the slabs? Could a single person handle putting them back in after I get it home?


25 replies so far

View Slyy's profile

Slyy

2425 posts in 1122 days


#1 posted 10-05-2015 02:30 AM

Abe, no experience to answer your questions but didn’t know what kinda saw it was so googled. Are you aware this saw was recalled? Just a reminder for your safety I case you were unaware

-- Jake -- "Not only do we live among the stars, the stars live within us." - Neil Degrasse Tyson

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4241 posts in 1665 days


#2 posted 10-05-2015 02:33 AM

If you have a trailer with a gate, just use a hand cart to move the saw. Remove the fence and extension wings if it has them. It’s not that heavy of a saw.

If you have a pickup, you can just flip the saw upside down. One person can do it, but two makes it really easy. If you go that route, remove the fence and extensions (if there), tilt the motor to 45 degrees and raise it up as far as it will go. Tip the saw so it’s resting on the tailgate, grab the base and lift/flip.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: I’ve loaded/hauled/unloaded lots of really heavy machinery by myself, including a Unisaw. You will be amazed at how easy it is.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View abehil's profile

abehil

104 posts in 805 days


#3 posted 10-05-2015 02:34 AM

Yes I know. I asked the seller and he said his was dated after the recall. Should I ask him about anything else?


Abe, no experience to answer your questions but didn t know what kinda saw it was so googled. Are you aware this saw was recalled?

- Slyy


View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 553 days


#4 posted 10-05-2015 02:37 AM

PurpLev (member) wrote a review of that saw. Bet he could advise.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View Slyy's profile

Slyy

2425 posts in 1122 days


#5 posted 10-05-2015 02:42 AM

I’d still certainly check the date codes of you can, better safe than sorry certainly. Haha, I could only imagine the excitement caused by an arbor failure with a dado blade in. Seems like a nice saw though especially if the price was right!

I’d say Brad pretty much got the procedure spot on though!

-- Jake -- "Not only do we live among the stars, the stars live within us." - Neil Degrasse Tyson

View abehil's profile

abehil

104 posts in 805 days


#6 posted 10-05-2015 02:53 AM

I don’t think I’ll be tipping it upside down. That sounds like a good way to break the granite, or at least chip it up. It has a nice mobile base. To me 450 lbs is pretty darn heavy and needs to be planned out so nobody gets hurt. Not everyone is still 25 or 30 years old ya know :)


If you have a trailer with a gate, just use a hand cart to move the saw. Remove the fence and extension wings if it has them. It s not that heavy of a saw.

If you have a pickup, you can just flip the saw upside down. One person can do it, but two makes it really easy. If you go that route, remove the fence and extensions (if there), tilt the motor to 45 degrees and raise it up as far as it will go. Tip the saw so it s resting on the tailgate, grab the base and lift/flip.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: I ve loaded/hauled/unloaded lots of really heavy machinery by myself, including a Unisaw. You will be amazed at how easy it is.

- MrUnix


View nicksmurf111's profile

nicksmurf111

361 posts in 917 days


#7 posted 10-05-2015 08:19 PM

Take it apart. At least that’s what I do when I purchase large tools. I put my table saw in the back of my old car…it just took about an hour to dis-assemble. Why risk breaking it?

-- Nicholas

View nicksmurf111's profile

nicksmurf111

361 posts in 917 days


#8 posted 10-05-2015 08:22 PM

I read here that the main slab weighs 88lbs. I guess it just matters how much you want to stoop over and lift.

https://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/power-tools/woodworking-discussion-forum/25758-r4511-assembly-hints

-- Nicholas

View abehil's profile

abehil

104 posts in 805 days


#9 posted 10-05-2015 09:09 PM

Yep. No need for any heroics. Thank you for the link in your second post.
I have a self imposed limit of 75 lbs for lifting briefly. I’ll manage the 88 if necessary. The sides are only 50 lbs which isn’t bad. Removing all three if possible with make the saw a good deal lighter on it’s wheels and I don’t see any issues getting that up or down a low sloping ramp. I have a minivan with the seats out which is where the slabs will ride. I have a 34” tall tool cart I made so if I can get it out of the car onto the cart I’ll probably have it made.

Hopefully it’s not a finger pinch putting them back on. :)


Take it apart. At least that s what I do when I purchase large tools. I put my table saw in the back of my old car…it just took about an hour to dis-assemble. Why risk breaking it?

- nicksmurf111

View SignWave's profile

SignWave

321 posts in 2502 days


#10 posted 10-05-2015 09:14 PM

The top is 3 pieces of granite. I would ABSOLUTELY NOT transport it without removing the side pieces at the very least. If not, then either the granite will crack where the pieces are bolted together, and/or the metal rods that hold the side pieces will bend. It’s designed for moving around a shop, not for bounding around in a trailer.

I’d take all 3 pieces off, personally. The middle piece is not that hard to remove/reattach, and you’ll need to re-align everything anyway. The saw is a bit top heavy and removing the top will remedy that. Once you do, you’ll have no trouble getting it onto a trailer.

FWIW, It’s a good saw as far as cutting goes. Not a big fan of the fence. The mobile base might work if you have a very smooth/level floor in your shop. I didn’t have good luck with it (not smooth, not level). The guard works ok, but I ended up tracing the pattern onto a flat piece of steel and making my own riving knife.

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

View abehil's profile

abehil

104 posts in 805 days


#11 posted 10-05-2015 11:12 PM

Exactly what I wanted to know. Are the side slabs more difficult to remove? Does the fence/rails need to be removed to get the granite out?

I do have a flat level garage floor. And I’m hoping that I see the benefit of the granite because I have 75% – 95% humidity here. Even my cats rust.


The top is 3 pieces of granite. I would ABSOLUTELY NOT transport it without removing the side pieces at the very least. If not, then either the granite will crack where the pieces are bolted together, and/or the metal rods that hold the side pieces will bend. It s designed for moving around a shop, not for bounding around in a trailer.

I d take all 3 pieces off, personally. The middle piece is not that hard to remove/reattach, and you ll need to re-align everything anyway. The saw is a bit top heavy and removing the top will remedy that. Once you do, you ll have no trouble getting it onto a trailer.

FWIW, It s a good saw as far as cutting goes. Not a big fan of the fence. The mobile base might work if you have a very smooth/level floor in your shop. I didn t have good luck with it (not smooth, not level). The guard works ok, but I ended up tracing the pattern onto a flat piece of steel and making my own riving knife.

- SignWave


View daddywoofdawg's profile

daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1041 days


#12 posted 10-05-2015 11:53 PM

I’ve rent my share of U-Haul trailers,and have never seen one with a ramp.are you sure you and the dealer are on the same page?
Look into renting a engine hoist (cherry picker), also buy some 1000 lb straps,wal-mart or a hardware store (they come in handy for other things) put the straps around the saw and use the hoist to lift it into the trailer and out.If you have a smooth hard surface driveway you can roll it right on in to the shop.

View nicksmurf111's profile

nicksmurf111

361 posts in 917 days


#13 posted 10-06-2015 01:12 AM

It’s my opinion that you are wasting money renting a trailer, ramps and/or cherry picker. The entire thing will easily fit in a minivan once you take it apart. Once you take the fence rails and granite off, I don’t see a reason to stop there.

-- Nicholas

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1646 posts in 1783 days


#14 posted 10-06-2015 01:30 AM

I just hauled a 120lb planer today and unloaded it from the back of a pickup by myself without any tools. It’s all about balance and leverage but that comes with experience. It was on a tall stand so it could easily be tipped up and down.

This is my approach:

Go equipped with a 2-wheel cart, 2×4 cut-offs, a piece of plywood, a couple crowbars and tie-down straps.

If loading into a minivan, I’d probably remove the fence rails and wings (van is probably too narrow), then position the saw behind the van. The plywood goes on the van floor and the cart gets strapped to the saw between the van and the machine. Then everything gets gently tipped over until the cart handle balances against the back of the van. At that point it’s just a matter of tipping the saw up and shoving it in. Block the wheels of the cart so everything stays put during the drive.

Crowbars are used as makeshift johnson bars as needed.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View SignWave's profile

SignWave

321 posts in 2502 days


#15 posted 10-06-2015 02:13 AM



It s my opinion that you are wasting money renting a trailer, ramps and/or cherry picker. The entire thing will easily fit in a minivan once you take it apart. Once you take the fence rails and granite off, I don t see a reason to stop there.

- nicksmurf111


agreed

-- Barry, http://BarrysWorkshop.com/

showing 1 through 15 of 25 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com