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Poly after paint

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Forum topic by dakremer posted 10-03-2015 07:24 PM 1173 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dakremer

2661 posts in 2931 days


10-03-2015 07:24 PM

Hey guys – quick question. I just got done painting some of my kitchen cabinets that I’m building. How long do you guys wait for the paint to dry before putting poly on?

I plan to use Minwax (water based) Polycrylic – Clear Satin (not sure if I should brush on, or spray on – how bad is cleaning the spray gun up after using poly?)

My cabinets are painted with ProClassic Interior Acrylic Latex (Sherwin Williams) – white.

Thanks for any advice!

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!


24 replies so far

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Shane

294 posts in 1650 days


#1 posted 10-03-2015 07:36 PM

Be careful. Poly tends to give a yellow tint to white paint. I just had this problem with my trim. Not sure what the best choice is but do some test pieces first. The acrylic might not need a top coat anyway

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dakremer

2661 posts in 2931 days


#2 posted 10-03-2015 07:40 PM



Be careful. Poly tends to give a yellow tint to white paint. I just had this problem with my trim. Not sure what the best choice is but do some test pieces first. The acrylic might not need a top coat anyway

- Shane

I thought that was just oil based poly? (I could be wrong)

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!

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dakremer

2661 posts in 2931 days


#3 posted 10-03-2015 07:42 PM

is there a better protective finish that I can put over my latex paint?

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!

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waho6o9

8036 posts in 2416 days


#4 posted 10-03-2015 07:59 PM

Leave well enough alone Doc!

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dakremer

2661 posts in 2931 days


#5 posted 10-03-2015 08:18 PM

I’m not following you Waho – don’t poly it?

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!

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chrisstef

17031 posts in 2846 days


#6 posted 10-03-2015 09:02 PM

I dont think id poly dak. Best bet is to ask the sherwin williams people. Theyre pretty knowledgable about their products.

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

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dakremer

2661 posts in 2931 days


#7 posted 10-03-2015 09:07 PM

Mt brother-in-law just told me the same thing – that he would not put a finish over it. That the paint alone should be strong enough. If this is the case, is there a good way to buff out the paint to get out some of the tiny bumps, without scratching the surface?

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!

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Kazooman

870 posts in 1792 days


#8 posted 10-03-2015 09:09 PM

I agree that my understanding is that water-based poly doesn’t give the yellow tone. However, the only times I have used it over paint was on colored finishes, so I wouldn’t see the issue as much. As far as brushing versus spraying, it would probably depend more on your spraying equipment than anything else. I would certainly recommend making several test panels to see what works best for your gear, technique, and personal taste. I think that the “leave well enough alone” comment was aimed at not making a mess of your cabinets by using the wrong finish, applying the poly after too little curing time for the paint, or with the wrong application technique. You can eliminate all of those variables by making test panels. I wouldn’t do a major project without doing that unless I was using a tried and true method I had used successfully before.

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Fish22

83 posts in 2953 days


#9 posted 10-03-2015 09:11 PM

I would use lacquer. Most professionally painted cabinets are top coated with lacquer.

-- Bryan, South River, NJ

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waho6o9

8036 posts in 2416 days


#10 posted 10-03-2015 09:21 PM

“That the paint alone should be strong enough.”

That’s my understanding as well.

” If this is the case, is there a good way to buff out the paint to get out some of the tiny bumps, without scratching the surface?”

Not to my knowledge. First I’d want to know what the tiny bumps are so we can alleviate them and then sand with
higher grits to get a professional finish.

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Kazooman

870 posts in 1792 days


#11 posted 10-03-2015 09:47 PM



I would use lacquer. Most professionally painted cabinets are top coated with lacquer.

- Fish22

Agreed. However, the vast majority of us do not have the equipment or spray booth to apply a lacquer finish like the pros do. The guy who did all of the custom cabinetry for my kitchen and master bath remodels has one hell of a shop. Incredible tools for machining the stock, dedicated assembly area to get it all square, large, dedicated sanding space with down flow tables, and spray ROOMS with laminar flow exhausts and highly filtered air intakes. The results are spectacular. I can’t really get comparable results in my cellar or garage workspace with a rattle can or HVLP sprayer. Water-based poly over paint is a good compromise that can look very nice, wear well, and mesh well with a home shop.

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joey502

510 posts in 1357 days


#12 posted 10-04-2015 03:36 AM

If you do apply poly I would definitely use a waterborne product. Waterborne poly in my opinion finishes much better by spraying.

I have read that minwax polycrylic does not spray well but have never tried it so I can not say for sure.

General high performance sprays well, you don’t need expensive spray equipment to use it either. I have used it several times out of a harbor frieght pneumatic hvlp.

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SuperCubber

1010 posts in 2124 days


#13 posted 10-04-2015 04:19 AM

I just applied Minwax Polycrylic, over latex paint, on these last week. It went on crystal clear and looks great.

As far as spraying it, the gun couldn’t be easier to clean. Once you’re done spraying, it’s just soap and water.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

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kevinw

190 posts in 3579 days


#14 posted 10-04-2015 10:33 PM

I echo the opinions about test panels. I would say definitely DO NOT use brushing lacquer over paint. It can tend to dissolve some paints and cause streaking or rumple up the paint as the lacquer cures. If you go with lacquer I would for sure spray if you have the equipment.

-- Kevin, Blue Springs, MO

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BentheViking

1782 posts in 2403 days


#15 posted 10-04-2015 11:39 PM

The Proclassic you used—was that an enamel not a paint? I believe that thats the same stuff when I redid my kitchen cabinets. I didn’t add a top coat. They held up pretty well and are very easy to clean.

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

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