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Forum topic by SilverFoxArt posted 2471 days ago 858 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SilverFoxArt

39 posts in 2479 days


2471 days ago

I made a wooden plaque to mount a flag holder to that has hung outside my home all summer. I had finished it with two coats of poly and was amazed at how poorly it weathered. My biggest concern is that I do Pyrographic art, and have a client who purchased a piece from me that is hung in his yard… you see my concern.

Anyway, what is the best finish for wood that really weatherproofs it, my second question is also what type of UV protection can I use to protect it from fading?

Any Help is appreciated, I am new here.

-- Mel, Utah, SilverFoxArt.com


10 replies so far

View shaun's profile

shaun

360 posts in 2503 days


#1 posted 2471 days ago

Hi Mel – I have to admit that I have no idea what pyrographic art is so take this for what it’s worth. I recently had a similiar question on finishing a cedar patio table that I had built for a customer. They wanted a high gloss finish and didn’t want the bother of regular maintenance. My immediate thought was spar urathane. It’s made for use in marine applications and I figure if it can stand up to regular salt water exposure it ought to be able to handle a patio. They are high solids and typically have UV inhibitors in them. The down sides are price (figure about $40/quart) and they tend to end up adding an orange color to your work. When I posted my question, fishmonger suggested trying Cetol “Clear”. By the time is saw his post I had already bought a quart of System Three so I never got the chance to try Cetol. The System Three did turn things orange but the customer loved it. I thinned it to about 3 parts urathane to 1 part mineral spirits because I wasn’t sure how it would act in a spray gun. The finish didn’t come out a smooth as I was hoping for, not sure what I could have done to make it better, but the customer was thrilled with it. I just delivered the table last week so I don’t have the test of time to share with you. Keeping my fingers crossed. You can see the table under construction in my Blogs and the finished product in my Projects to get an idea of the color change.
Hope this helps.

-- I've cut that board three times and it's still too short!

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2491 days


#2 posted 2471 days ago

I do a wee bit of outdoor woodworking and the bottom line is that there isnt any finish that lasts….....period. That said there are some that are better then others.

Marine grade varnish (will add an amber colour) works well. Like “Petite” and others, available at specialty marine stores. The difference between specialty marine varnishes and the Big Borg marine varnishes are night and day, worth every dime you spend. The problem with varnish is that sooner or later you have to strip and refinish.

Cetol and Flood (both owned by the same compnay) are also excellent. Oil based, albeit they sometimes say “lifetime warrenty”..............they last about ten years. Solid colours dont last as long as the tranluscent colours and the darker the colour the less they last.

Good Luck

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View SilverFoxArt's profile

SilverFoxArt

39 posts in 2479 days


#3 posted 2470 days ago

Thanks for the help You can look at my web site if you want to know what pyrographic art is… I am a “wood burner” I have been into art and wood working since I can remember, not a professional at either till pyrography. I would say that it is the perfect blend of two great loves. Since it is art, the finishes that discolor may not be an option, but I will try the others. I have asked this question of friends who do woodworking, and of other pyrographers in another group… this is the best, and really only response I have had with anyone who knows. It is nice to have found a skilled group of woodworkers, so I can pick your brains again when I need to. Thanks

-- Mel, Utah, SilverFoxArt.com

View Peter Oxley's profile

Peter Oxley

1426 posts in 2472 days


#4 posted 2470 days ago

Maybe I’m talking out of my ear – I don’t really do much outdoor work – but what about clear epoxy? The guys who build cedar-strip kayaks use epoxy to seal up the wood. You may be able to get epoxy with UV inhibitor, or maybe put spar varnish over the epoxy? Not a expert suggestion by any means, but maybe another avenue for you to explore.

-- http://www.peteroxley.com -- http://north40studios.etsy.com --

View dalec's profile

dalec

613 posts in 2486 days


#5 posted 2470 days ago

Hi Mel,

I saw in a discussion on one of the woodworking forums a discussion about outdoor finishing and a recommendation was made on a particular product. I wish I had bookmarked it. I copied the url for the product however. So for what’s worth, you may want to check this site out: http://www.bristolfinish.com/

The individual had made a very nice wooden spiral stair rail that was to be installed outside and wanted suggestions on how to protect it from the elements. According to the individual making the suggestion, the product is used on high end yachts.

Hope this is helpful.

Dalec

View shaun's profile

shaun

360 posts in 2503 days


#6 posted 2470 days ago

I checked out your site Mel, nice Stuff! Thanks for teaching me something.

-- I've cut that board three times and it's still too short!

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2491 days


#7 posted 2470 days ago

After submitting the last response and well on my drive to the job site, I thought exactly that…......EPOXY. I’ve made a couple cedar strip canoes and used clear fiberglass cloth with a 2 part epoxy…....didnt really discolour the cedar albeit I havent seen the canoes in 15 years, and I cant see why one couldnt skip the cloth and use the epoxy.

Dalec…......thanks for the link to Bristol

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View newbie's profile

newbie

1 post in 2470 days


#8 posted 2470 days ago

For what it’s worth…. epoxy has absolutely no UV resistance. It must be protected with a coating that has UV inhibitors, otherwise there will be degradation in very short order.

Regards

View dalec's profile

dalec

613 posts in 2486 days


#9 posted 2470 days ago

Did some more research and came across this particular discussion: http://www.askthebuilder.com/B159_Urethane_-_Oil_Based_Paint_vs_Water_Based_Finishes.shtml

Am just starting woodworking and have just begun to realize the complex world of finishing.

Dalec

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3960 posts in 2661 days


#10 posted 2470 days ago

Sean Clarke a professional re-finisher uses a combination of epoxy and Epifanes marine varnish. There was an article in Fine Woodworking #179 about the process. Link is here if you have signed on for FWW.com. He primes with MultiWoodPrime epoxy by Smith & Company, overcoats with a thinned marine varnish. The two bond to one another. When the finish needs renewal in several years outside, he scuffs and re-applies the thinned marine varnish.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

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