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Forum topic by Gixxerjoe04 posted 09-29-2015 01:16 AM 767 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1039 days


09-29-2015 01:16 AM

So I went to work on some stuff tonight and moved wood around, found an unsettling sight, pretty big piles of sawdust I didn’t create. I cut into a piece until I found what it was, only saw the back end and it went flying(not literally with wings) off when I was slamming the wood down to try to get it out. It looks like a grub worm or meal worm from the back. Only found the dust by 3 pieces of wood, hedge Apple and maple. I measure one of the holes and it was 6.2mm, seemed pretty large for termites but i have no clue. I threw the pieces out, checked the wood around it and didn’t see any signs of them, any ideas?


17 replies so far

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bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1183 days


#1 posted 09-29-2015 01:56 AM

I’ve dealt with a lot of ash that has been attacked by the borer beetle and the hole size looks similar to what you have pictured. In the wood that I’ve cut, they typically stay close to the bark boring into the sapwood infrequently. For this reason, I always leave suspect wood away from anything I don’t want contaminated. I will usually spray an insecticide of some sort on ash after I’ve milled it so when the little perpetrators peek out they get exposed to the poison and they’re no longer a worry. I have a chunk of a cherry tree left by my wood pile instead of in the shop because it’s getting lots of tiny holes bored straight into the wood as I’ve already removed the bark. The holes look like a 0.9mm pencil lead would fit perfectly so whatever kind of bug it is, it’s awfully small.

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1039 days


#2 posted 09-29-2015 02:02 AM

The bug in your stuff would be the powder post beetle I’d say, I had them in some maple before. I looked up about the ash bore because another guy mentioned it, website said they only affect ash trees and this bored into the heart wood. I was really surprised it was in the hedge apple, that stuff is hard as a rock.

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1039 days


#3 posted 09-29-2015 02:07 AM

This wood has been in my garage for over a year and haven’t noticed this before and I did bring some ash home a month or so ago but it’s outside in my wood pile out back and wasn’t in my garage. The back end of whatever it was didn’t look like the ash bore larva pics I looked at either, and the trails they leave compared to this were different. Think i might go get some insecticide and spray that pile down. I had a few pieces of live edge stuff beside the infected wood and it wasn’t touched luckily. I just pray whatever it is, were just in the 3 pieces I saw, will have to give everything a good look over tomorrow.

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1938 days


#4 posted 09-29-2015 02:09 AM

The good thing is that it is not the dreaded powderpost beetle. The hole in the pic is much too large. Those look like longhorn beetle holes. I suspect that the beetles are long gone, and you are OK.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1039 days


#5 posted 09-29-2015 02:18 AM

Wish you were right, but these are brand new holes, and I found one still inside and alive. I tried getting it out by slamming the piece. I somehow didn’t see it crawl out another hole and while slamming it, threw it off somewhere. I smashed part of it’s rear end so hopefully it dies, I searched up and down looking for the body but no luck. It was in wood that was still somewhat green but has been in my garage over a year. Going to have to pull out all my wood and check everything but I didn’t see any evidence it was in my kiln dried stuff.

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1039 days


#6 posted 09-29-2015 02:20 AM

After looking at larvae pics of the longhorn beetle, does look similar from what little piece I saw of it.

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1938 days


#7 posted 09-29-2015 11:49 AM

They make the holes, but at least they are not virulent like powderpost beetles.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1183 days


#8 posted 09-29-2015 01:26 PM

Here’s the damage that I have.

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Redoak49

1947 posts in 1451 days


#9 posted 09-29-2015 01:51 PM

I hope you can save your wood. I looked up powder post beetles and on a Clemson university site found out there are a whole bunch of different ones. There is a bunch of data and info on control. Heat treating the wood works on some but not all types handstands of development.

Best of Luck

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1039 days


#10 posted 09-29-2015 04:34 PM

Yea bigblock, looks like powder post beetles. I cut into another piece of wood and found the suspect, cut it in half when cutting into it, but can still see the head.

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1938 days


#11 posted 09-30-2015 12:55 AM

You have damage from more than one type of beetle. The grub in the pic above is not a powderpost beetle larvae.

The holes in the weathered wood looks line ambrosia beetles. Are the tunnels in the wood with pencil lead sized holes filled with sawdust or open?

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1039 days


#12 posted 09-30-2015 01:08 AM

Oh I know mine isn’t powder post beetles. Didn’t think about ambrosia beetles for bigblock pics, should be able to look at end of the log to see if it is I would think. I love ambrosia maple.

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bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1183 days


#13 posted 09-30-2015 01:48 AM

The holes by the pencil lead are open.

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2152 days


#14 posted 09-30-2015 01:48 AM

Longhorn beetle larva are very common here but I have never seen any live ones in dried wood. Ditto for the ambrosia beetle larva.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Joe Diederichs

4 posts in 432 days


#15 posted 09-30-2015 02:14 PM

At least some of the larva might have come from the bark left on the boards. They live under the bark, eating that tender, tasty layer of living cells (cambium). When that dries out, they wander into the wood. The very first boards that I cut from a tree were red oak, and I left the bark on a lot of them. Later, when they were air-dry and moved into the shop, I found piles of powder (frass) and damage like you show in your first set of pictures, but only on the boards that had bark on them. They had never been through a kiln (which would have killed the grubs). Do the three boards that have damage also have bark on them?

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