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Forum topic by JoeinGa posted 09-26-2015 08:31 PM 1573 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View JoeinGa's profile (online now)


7383 posts in 1429 days

09-26-2015 08:31 PM

Well SHEEEEEIT! I was given some rather large planks of cedar a while back. It came from a cabinet makers shop which was closed down when he passed away about 8 years ago. I helped his wife move some stuff so she could sell the building and when she tried to pay me I asked if I could have some of the wood instead.

She told me that when he was in business he used to buy ALL his wood from one lumbermill and he trusted the guy to always pick out the “good stuff” when he ordered lumber. She said they never had any issues with his lumber. I’ve used some of the wood and it has been some VERY nice stuff. Rough cut to thicker and wider than “normal” and very clean wood.

So anyways, I’m running a piece of this cedar 1.5” X 12” X 6’ thru my DeWalt planer when all of a sudden I realize I have a small “ridge” starting about 2” off one edge as it’s coming out. I shut down and take a close look at the board. DAMN! THIS little shiney spot catches my eye!

Yeaaaah Aw CRAP! That’s METAL! My best hope is that it’s an old lead bullet and just MAYBE my blades wont be totally ruined. Sure enough I cut the board and using a chisel I break away the wood and find THIS!




Next thing I did was get out my metal detector and check the rest of the board, looks like that was the only piece in it. Well, I just hope I can shift the three blades left and right enough to overcome this nick. A set of blades is NOT in the budget in the foreseeable future.

So take heed folks. Even if someone tells you they’ve never had any issues with all the lumber they’ve bought, remove all doubt and check it yourself.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

23 replies so far

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

21568 posts in 1760 days

#1 posted 09-26-2015 08:44 PM

Yup, it’s a constant problem when milling your own lumber.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View Dutchy's profile


1976 posts in 1590 days

#2 posted 09-26-2015 09:10 PM

Hello Joe.

That’s a pitty. You can shift the blades left and right but you will still see or feel the knives damage.

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?

View runswithscissors's profile


2127 posts in 1447 days

#3 posted 09-26-2015 11:03 PM

Your knives aren’t double edged? If they are, there’s an easy solution.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View bigblockyeti's profile (online now)


3576 posts in 1143 days

#4 posted 09-26-2015 11:09 PM

I did the same thing with my DeWalt planer. The blades just barely kissed the edge of a forgotten wood screw leaving several very tiny nicks in all three blades. I was able to shift one left, one right and leave the third untouched and it eliminated the problem. I was lucky because of how small the nicks were, the blades allow very little movement from side to side.

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

1698 posts in 485 days

#5 posted 09-26-2015 11:12 PM

Ewwwww. Joe. A fence staple. Ewwwwwwww. And it was embedded? That’s so weird. A mystery is afoot.

-- Mark

View SirIrb's profile


1239 posts in 652 days

#6 posted 09-26-2015 11:19 PM

Worst thing I ever found was a piece of lead bird shot in some oak. Planed that ball in half.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View Chris's profile


331 posts in 3508 days

#7 posted 09-27-2015 01:25 AM

Daggone that sucks. Sorry to hear that Joe. Hopefully you can shift your blades a little bit and displace the nicks in the blade or flip them over. Let us know what you find out.

-- Chris Harrell - custom callmaker "Quacky Calls" Eastern NC.

View Jerry's profile


1710 posts in 1070 days

#8 posted 09-27-2015 02:59 AM

Wow Joe, sorry for your planer, but thanks for sharing. I never thought to check my boards for metal, but I sure will from now on.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be.

View doubleDD's profile (online now)


5067 posts in 1465 days

#9 posted 09-27-2015 03:15 AM

That’s a bummer Joe. Good thing you weren’t turning on the lathe.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View splatman's profile


546 posts in 821 days

#10 posted 09-27-2015 03:18 AM

I ran some 2×3s thru my planer this morning, and 1 had a nail in it. How I missed that, IDK. Planed the backs of some maple flooring planks later, and no problems there. I’ll have to check my planer. It has a Shelix cutter head; maybe that helped.

View CFrye's profile


8581 posts in 1262 days

#11 posted 09-27-2015 04:58 AM

Ouch! Thanks for the warning, Joe.

-- God bless, Candy

View bobasaurus's profile


2587 posts in 2606 days

#12 posted 09-27-2015 06:29 AM

Hmm, I should buy a metal detector.

-- Allen, Colorado

View ScottM1's profile


122 posts in 1005 days

#13 posted 09-27-2015 08:59 AM

I learned rather quick back when my dad and I ran our mill. A dark stain in an otherwise clear section is a really good sine of metal.

-- Scott Marshburn,, FaceBook,, Twitter,

View mikeacg's profile


166 posts in 479 days

#14 posted 09-27-2015 10:58 AM

I bought a wand when I got my sawmill and have used it faithfully ever since. You never know what someone may have pounded into a tree! It’s a lot cheaper than a new set of planer blades…

-- Mike, A Yooper with a drawl,

View Tennessee's profile


2410 posts in 1936 days

#15 posted 09-27-2015 11:53 AM

Lots of guys milling lumber have a footage rule – they only take trees that are so many feet away from roads, etc.

But that doesn’t count when you think in terms of a huge back yard, where someone may have put up a clothesline, and in this case that would have degraded long ago, leaving the fence staple in the wood.

It’s happened to all of us. I lost a couple of sets of blades over the years to metal. So far, (hope I am not cursing myself), I’ve avoided the issue with my helix carbide cutterhead, although I did hit a bullet in some oak with it and it did no damage.

-- Paul, Tennessee,

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