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Forum topic by Paladin posted 1699 days ago 1104 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Paladin

6 posts in 1700 days


1699 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: resource question ash carving shaping traditional

I made a canoe paddle out of cherry for my granddaughter. This led to my daughter and a friend asking me to make one for them and the “friend” wanted me to use ash. I’m about halfway through the project with both paddles and am stalled due to the difficulty in working with the wood. It dulls chisles and planes when they are able to cut it at all. Practically the only tools I can use to work the wood effectively are power tools and they aren’t really suitable for the complex curves inolved. If anyone has any suggestions about how to work this wood I’d appreciate them. Then maybe I can start work on them again. Thanks for any ideas you can give me.

-- Bill, Pennsylvania


8 replies so far

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jackass

350 posts in 2309 days


#1 posted 1699 days ago

I bought a Kutzall disk for my angle grinder. Most agressive tool I’ve seen in a long while. I would consider this for roughing out the general shape and getting it to where you can use regular tools. Don’t remember the exact price, but around $50.00. Available for less on E-Bay. Hope this helps. Forgot to say it is somewhat mushroom shaped, and will do curves and indentations quite well.
Jack

-- Jack Keefe Shediac NB Canada

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Paladin

6 posts in 1700 days


#2 posted 1698 days ago

Thanks, I looked them up and you’re right, they are not cheap but then what is? I just wouldn’t have occurred to me to take an angle grinder to wood. I got one when I restored a 1963 Austin-Healey so I’ve got the tool, might as well use it. Thanks for the suggestion.

Bill

-- Bill, Pennsylvania

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jackass

350 posts in 2309 days


#3 posted 1698 days ago

Hi Paladin,
I owned a 1960 Austin Healey that I bought new. I flew to Montreal and drove it off the dock and home to New Brunswick. About a 10 hour drive. It was white with red leather and tri carbs. Very nice car. Wish I had it back. Would enjoy hearing about your restoration. I think I could find the manual if you still have yours, if you want it.
Jack

-- Jack Keefe Shediac NB Canada

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a1Jim

111999 posts in 2173 days


#4 posted 1698 days ago

I agree with the angle grinder but you can also use a padded rubber head with 24 grit and that’s cut wood fast also. I owned an 1963 Austin Healey 3000 .

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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papadan

1111 posts in 1964 days


#5 posted 1698 days ago

I like to use the flap disc on my angle grinder for shaping wood. Flap disc are a lot safer than those cutter disc. great prices at this site too. http://www.lehighvalleyabrasives.com/servlet/the-Flap-Discs/Categories

-- Carpenter assembles with hands, Designer builds with brains, Artist creates with heart!

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Paladin

6 posts in 1700 days


#6 posted 1698 days ago

Jack,

You had a 3000 Mk II, an early one as they were the only ones fitted with three carbs, an attempt to get some more horses out of that engine. Instead of just letting them alone people tried to futz with them and had problems balancing them and they were replaced with a twin carb setup which gets us to my car. I have a 1963 3000 Mk II BJ7 that I bought in 1977. I didn’t really know what I was getting myself in for. The previous owner had sprayed undercoating over rust and in 5 years it had rusted out to the point where you couldn’t hang an exhaust system from anywhere on the undercarriage. It sat for 15 years. In 1990 I finally had enough time and almost enough money to work on it. I found a fellow who worked on them kind of as a hobby and he and I took it down and built it back up. Every weekend and two nights a week for a year. I’ve changed my picture to one of me and the car so you can see the results. It was a project I’d do once.

Just so there’s some related content, the Morgan, another classic British sports car was made with an ash frame. Covered with copper. Another difference is that the Morgan is still produced while British Leyland killed the Austin-Healey in 1967 aided and abetted by the US bumper and emissions restrictions.

Bill

-- Bill, Pennsylvania

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jackass

350 posts in 2309 days


#7 posted 1698 days ago

Bill
Thankyou, glad you still have it, I was too young to appreciate the car, and opted for a 59 Chev rag top, still regret it to this day. Hope you enjoy many rouble free miles, great project.
Jack

-- Jack Keefe Shediac NB Canada

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Paladin

6 posts in 1700 days


#8 posted 1698 days ago

There were 60,000 big (3000) Healey’s made. I figure there are about 1/3 of them left. I’m amazed at the number of people I run into that owned one. Sorry if this should be happening in the Coffee Lounge or something, I’m a newbie. There’s no wood in the Mk II Healey’s, the Mk III’s had a wooden dash panel. There, I got wood into the post.

Thanks for the ideas, guys. I’ll probably try them all. I’m not good at this, just a hobbyist who likes to make things, mostly for my grandchildren and friends, and now I’m retired so I can. I’ve done more carving than lumber work but that is pretty primitive stuff as well. High school shop and some evenings spent with my watchmaker Uncle is all the training I’ve got.

-- Bill, Pennsylvania

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