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Shellac Over Gel Stain?

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Forum topic by Bonvivant1 posted 09-25-2015 07:03 PM 582 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bonvivant1

8 posts in 441 days


09-25-2015 07:03 PM

Hello!

I just discovered this site and it is AWESOME! I will definitely be wasting some work time on this site. Anyway, I have a finishing question and I hope your collective knowledge can help. I am trying to finish some cherry interior doors. I have decided that I want to use a glazing technique to even out the finish and ensure a nice result.

I am generally familiar with the glazing process. I plan on spraying a seal coat of 2 pound cut shellac and then glazing.

I want to use General Finishes Georgian Cherry gel stain. However, i want to top coat with shellac. Can I do this? I think General Finishes recommends using their gel polyurethane. However, i do not like the look of poly. I much prefer shellac and have used it throughout my home.

Can I shellac over the gel stain? Does it matter if the shellac is waxed or unwaxed? Is there some better way to achieve the color of the georgian cherry stain?

All advice is appreciated!

-- You took your first pinch like a man and you learned the two greatest things in life...Never rat on your friends and always keep your mouth shut.--Jimmy Conway


4 replies so far

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Fred Hargis

3949 posts in 1960 days


#1 posted 09-25-2015 07:24 PM

You can, it will look great. I do wonder about the durability of shellac on a door (you didn’t say what doors these were). Ammonia, found in many cleaners, will absolutely destroy shellac so something more durable may be needed. As for the waxed/unwaxed, the only concern about natural shellac (waxed) is that there is sometimes an adhesion problem with urethane finishes (and some waterborne ones as well). You can gamble, and will probably win, using natural shellac, but to be safe you may want to use dewaxed. I agree about the look of poly, and I don’t use poly anything in my shop. But you can get some alkyd resin varnishes that look much better (to my eyes). My favorite (very hard to find) is Pratt and Lambert 38, an alkyd resin/soya oil formula and has a lot less amber than linseed oil formulas. Another good one, and easier to find is Sherwin Williams Fast Dry Oil Varnish (careful, they sell urethane varnish as well). It’s an alkyd resin/linseed oil formula…more yellow than the P&L, but still a nice product.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Bonvivant1

8 posts in 441 days


#2 posted 09-25-2015 07:42 PM

Thank you so much! That is exactly the advice i was looking for. I love the look of shellac. All of the trim in my home is shellac. However, these are interior doors. They may be exposed to cleaning chemicals or water at some time. I might do the Pratt and Lambert 38. Would you say that the satin or gloss version of the varnish is closer to the shine of shellac?

-- You took your first pinch like a man and you learned the two greatest things in life...Never rat on your friends and always keep your mouth shut.--Jimmy Conway

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3949 posts in 1960 days


#3 posted 09-25-2015 08:18 PM

I would say the gloss version is closer to the sheen of shellac, and it’s the only one I’ve ever used (I’m a gloss guy) though I have 2 cans of semi gloss in my stash. If you want it to be less you could buff it down slightly with rubbing compound. Good luck finding it, I have to order it over the internet.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2280 days


#4 posted 09-25-2015 10:15 PM

Yes you can use shellac in that manner.
You might consider a 1# cut for the sealer coat. The thicker the seal coat of shellac, the lighter the stain will look. On the other hand, if you go too thin on the seal coat, the cherry will still blotch. I usually start with a 3:2 mix of denatured alcohol to Bullseye SealCoat and make some sample boards. If it solves the blotching I use that ratio. If not, I use a 1:1 ratio.

Bullseye SealCoat is dewaxed, but the topcoat can be regular waxed shellac.

Good luck

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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