LumberJocks

Top Check, must I breadboard?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by ChefHDAN posted 09-25-2015 05:04 PM 836 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

806 posts in 2311 days


09-25-2015 05:04 PM

In the midst of building a new entertainment center, I decided to increase the dimensions for more width in the cabinets forgetting that the pieces I had for the top were close to the total length and had some end checks. The stock is air dried cherry that I was able to get for $1 bf and I’ve been dealing with a few defects but overall it has been working well. Just cut the top to the final expected dimension and all but 1 check went to the waste side. The check is 2” in to the top and goes through the piece. Top is a heavy inch thick, and I need some sage LJ advice for how to deal with it. I have to inlay 3 dutchmans in the top for knots already, and was planning to do a walnut double border inlay frame on the top but don’t think that might be possible with the bread board, but maybe inside the ends with walnut pegs???

What do you think?

!

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it


18 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3551 posts in 1229 days


#1 posted 09-25-2015 05:08 PM

Most cherry have dark lines running through them. I would use some combination of sap and dark cherry sawdust and mix the powder with glue and work it in there. It should look like one of the other natural dark lines.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

806 posts in 2311 days


#2 posted 09-25-2015 05:16 PM

Thanks Jinx!

Ever try glue & dust with epoxy? Part of me is worried about the check continuing & I’ll need to do something to arrest it…. even slightly considering a bowtie on the end grain….. but that’s crazy isn’t it???

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3551 posts in 1229 days


#3 posted 09-25-2015 05:21 PM

The problem with epoxy is that the final result will be somewhat shiny which is not a big deal if the whole thing is going to be shiny like poly. I have also used bondo a lot but you have to use color pencils to match the grain. Best bet for that is to put a coat of finish on it, sand it, used the color pencil or colored lacquer before putting the final coat or two on.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3551 posts in 1229 days


#4 posted 09-25-2015 05:25 PM

That kind of crack is not really a check. As you will notice, it is a layered separation which is again common with cherry. You may have to use a box cutter to take the top layer out so the glue can penetrate. I normally use straight glue with the help of a very, very thin wire to dampen the whole thing top to bottom before applying the sawdust dough.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 1949 days


#5 posted 09-25-2015 05:26 PM

Wood glue creates a stronger bond than the original wood has.

If you don’t believe it, glue a couple of pieces of wood together with wood glue, wait until completely cured and then try to break them apart.
Where they break won’t be at the seam, it will be somewhere in the grain on both sides.

For that crack I would suck wood glue into it and then pull it tight with a screw from the side, squeezing out the excess.

When the glue is cured, remove the screw or not as you prefer.

Good luck

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

806 posts in 2311 days


#6 posted 09-25-2015 05:33 PM

Okay, layered separation, that makes sense with the cut off, since I’m putting in the dutchmans, I’m okay with it having the character, I just don’t want to watch the crack run down the table.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7910 posts in 1842 days


#7 posted 09-25-2015 05:34 PM

Yellow glue shrinks, epoxy will look muddy, I prefer CA glue and sanding dust. Agree with Jinx to make it dark/black. I am not sure that I would trust that fix on something like an entertainment center. I don’t know if there is an accepted way to fix it but I can think of several. 1) Drill a small hole at the end of the crack and glue a dowel, that will prevent the check from spreading but then you need to hide the dowel with a dutchman. 2) You could try squirting glue inside with a syringe then clamping

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3551 posts in 1229 days


#8 posted 09-25-2015 05:39 PM

I very much doubt it will go anywhere. the end has to expand further in order for it to do that. These mostly want to bow or separate in an upward or downward directions instead of left or right. The dough should help the glue from oozing out from the bottom so, be sure you have some there as well. Two taped cauls with clamp will ensure the fiber separations are aligned and properly glued together.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

806 posts in 2311 days


#9 posted 09-25-2015 05:39 PM

Top is 63” x 23 1/2” x 1 1/8 consists of 4 pieces glued up, crack is in one of the center boards.

If not for the inlay desire, I’d go the Dutchman and screw & cover

Contemplating now doing the three Dutchmen in walnut, scraping the border, and placing some bowties over the crack… stuck between concealment and showcasing….

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7910 posts in 1842 days


#10 posted 09-25-2015 05:45 PM

How much effort to fix it if it goes wrong vs the effort to fix it right the first time, that’s what I would ask myself. Thinking about it some more, I would stick to your original plan with the inlay and use dowels or splines under the inlay to tie the crack together.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

806 posts in 2311 days


#11 posted 09-25-2015 06:11 PM

Rick, that’s where I think I’ve got to go with the breadboard, because a Dutchman on top of the crack won’ t do diddly for the end grain, so I think I must either fully hide it or flaunt it… arggh

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2279 days


#12 posted 09-25-2015 06:35 PM

I really don’t think that breadboards will help. They are used to stop wide panels from warping, not to stop checking or cracking. Since they’re pegged on rather than glued I really don’t see how it would help – they’re built to allow seasonal movement after all.
I guess it would hide the check in the end grain, though.
I could be wrong, of course…

Edit: sorry, you mean cut the part off with the check and then add breadboards to get it to the right length, right?

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7910 posts in 1842 days


#13 posted 09-25-2015 06:39 PM

The dutchman I mentioned was only to hide the repair, it is not the repair. What I’m suggesting is a spline or dowel across the crack that goes from top to bottom and prevents the wood from splitting more. Alternately a spline through the end grain would do the same but you couldn’t hide it. Then you can hide the crack with whatever concoction you choose and hide the spline or dowel with the inlay you originally planned.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

806 posts in 2311 days


#14 posted 09-25-2015 08:36 PM

jdh – very good point about stopping the check, yes my thought was to add 3” BB to cut out check

Rick – Gotcha!, I could cut the inlay dado and slip a screw in and then cover it with the inlay. glue it fill it sand it and live with it!!!! I think that’s a winner!

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2183 posts in 1487 days


#15 posted 09-26-2015 11:22 PM

If the check is parallel to the sides, you could rip the board right down through the middle of the crack, and then glue it back together.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com