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Forum topic by pickles posted 11-25-2009 04:33 PM 2272 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pickles

68 posts in 2063 days


11-25-2009 04:33 PM

I have been asked to make serving trays for a nice restaraunt in town. The trays are for a dish they serve called “The Rock Fillet”; it’s fantastic, I digress. Basically its a tray (12” x 18”) that recieves a 450 F flat rock, a raw steak fillet is placed off to the side of the rock and you cook your own steak at your table. They currently have some that were made 10 years ago and the company who made them is long gone. My challenge is to find a product that will hold up to the temperature and allow the diner to cut the steak on one half of the tray and cook it on the rock on the other half. I found this product, Richlite, I think it’ll work but it costs about $1000.00 for a 3/4” x 4’ x 8’ sheet. I haven’t given the owner a cost yet as I’m just doing the research now. If anyone has any ideas to help me lower my material costs I’d appreciate it.
This is roughly what the tray will look like.

tray


19 replies so far

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CaptainSkully

1190 posts in 2208 days


#1 posted 11-25-2009 05:41 PM

We use unglazed clay tiles from a big box store’s flooring section to cook our pizzas on. They’re cheap and can stand the heat in the kitchen.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

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pickles

68 posts in 2063 days


#2 posted 11-25-2009 05:56 PM

Thanks Captain, but this needs to a product that I can machine to hold 3 sauce containers and a hot rock. The server brings this thing to your table with a 450F rock on it, it can’t slide off into the customers lap.

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pickles

68 posts in 2063 days


#3 posted 11-25-2009 06:00 PM

I put a better picture in

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mynoblebear

722 posts in 1757 days


#4 posted 11-25-2009 06:05 PM

I had not seen Richlite before I will keep it in mind for materials that we have at our disposal. According to the specks this product takes a temperature of 350 and you mention 450. Because of this I might recommend lining the area that this 450 degree flat rock sites in with some unglazed tiles. The main tray I think I would go with maple impregnated with food grade mineral oil.

-- Best Regards With Personalized Rocking Chairs And Furniture On My Mind, http://mynoblebear.com

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MrsN

939 posts in 2176 days


#5 posted 11-25-2009 07:42 PM

Do the old ones offer any more hints as to what they might have been made of or finished with?

-- ----- www.KNWoodworking.com ----- --

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pickles

68 posts in 2063 days


#6 posted 11-25-2009 08:39 PM

The old ones look MDF, but much heavier and denser; also the area that holds the rock is definitely burnt. However, they’ve lasted ten years of daily use despite the burnt area, my thought was to get a sample from Richlite and set one of the rocks on it and see what happens.

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pickles

68 posts in 2063 days


#7 posted 11-25-2009 08:43 PM

The maple is not a good choice since it must be run through a commercial dishwasher. My goal is to try to find a similar product to the one they are currently made of, unfortunately no one at the restaurant knows what material it is. I’m hoping someone here has used a material similar.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14742 posts in 2326 days


#8 posted 11-26-2009 03:32 AM

Why not use solid wood and put some tile on it to hold the rock. You could machine it but not have joints ot contend with.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Derek Lyons's profile

Derek Lyons

584 posts in 2218 days


#9 posted 11-26-2009 04:18 AM

I’d test the Richlite not just to see how it responds to the rock, but also to see how it responds to being cut on daily (and whether or not it tears knives up), and to how it responds to being run through a commercial dishwasher. Three things it needs to do, and precisely none of them are in its design specs.

-- Derek, Bremerton WA --

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pickles

68 posts in 2063 days


#10 posted 11-26-2009 04:37 AM

Derek – I chose Richlite as my baseline because it is expressly made for cutting and commercial dishwashers. The company makes Epicurean brand cutting boards and Richlite Foodservice cutting surfaces. I originally linked to Richlite’s site that offers full sheets that allow me to custom cut to specified size. Sorry for the confusion. It’s also NSF certified. I think i want to use a manmade product just wondering if their are other manmade alternatives.

View Derek Lyons's profile

Derek Lyons

584 posts in 2218 days


#11 posted 11-26-2009 07:37 AM

I think where the confusion arose (on my part) is because you linked to their line of counter tops.

FWIW, I’ve owned one of those Epicurean cutting boards… It went in the goodwill donation box after about a month because it was hell on my knives.

-- Derek, Bremerton WA --

View hootr's profile

hootr

183 posts in 1996 days


#12 posted 11-26-2009 02:28 PM

maybe check out “ipe”
i’ve read here it’s suppose to have a fire rating like concrete
never used it tho

-- Ron, Missouri

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 2896 days


#13 posted 11-26-2009 02:35 PM

I used to work in a foundry and we had flat fire brick that would withstand the heat of molten iron 2800 degrees F. You may try that for the hot rock, it could be screwed to whatever material you use for the food service. No meat is going to slide off the brick. You could get firebrick in any size.

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

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pickles

68 posts in 2063 days


#14 posted 11-26-2009 04:31 PM

The restaurant already has the hot rocks. They use soap stone, it doesn’t have many internal stresses so it can be repeatably heated. As far as the dulling the knives goes, I don’t think the owner is two concerned as people tend to cut their steak on the rock itself. They use restaurant grade steak knives.

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pickles

68 posts in 2063 days


#15 posted 11-26-2009 04:32 PM

I wonder if Ipe is food safe? I know its very oily.

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