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Butchers block design

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Forum topic by dgray posted 11-24-2009 05:12 PM 2105 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dgray

2 posts in 2566 days


11-24-2009 05:12 PM

Hi There. I have designed an end-grain butchers block for my kitchen. I remember reading an article about butchers blocks many years ago about including a draft angle on the middle section. The middle section is made of end grain harwood, with an angle on it so that when it expands it moves upwards, instead of outwards. – does that make sense, and has anyone got any experiance in making this style of butchers block. What angle is normal??

Any tips greatly appreciated.
Cheers

chopping block design


5 replies so far

View jlsmith5963's profile

jlsmith5963

297 posts in 2809 days


#1 posted 11-24-2009 10:03 PM

dgray

I am unaware of the draft angle technique, however, I have some experience with constructing a large (60×45) end grain countertop. The picture below is of an island countertop that is now over 4 years old. The individual pieces were cut from the 50 year old wall studs that were removed for the remodel. It was very labor intensive (nail pulling, surfacing to square the edges, cutting to size, gluing up piece by piece, etc.). No fancy technique was used to control wood movement. The slab is sealed (several coats) on all sides and then attached with screws to the cabinet through slotted holes. It is holding up quite well so far.

end grain

-- criticism: the art of analyzing and evaluating the quality of an artistic work...

View childress's profile

childress

841 posts in 3002 days


#2 posted 11-25-2009 08:14 AM

Interesting pic. To me, it would only make sense if you were going to use a long grain boarder and basically let the block sit in the “frame”. If the whole block is end grain, no angle needed.

-- Childress Woodworks

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BlankMan

1488 posts in 2814 days


#3 posted 11-25-2009 09:01 AM

Norm did a butcher block table that way a while back where the butcher block floated in the frame for exactly the reason you stated. I remember he did angle cuts on the inside of the frame and on the outside of the butcher block. He used two different angles, one on the frame the other on the butcher block to reduce the surface area where the two pieces contacted each other so that they wouldn’t bind and seize together. I’ve got that episode DVR’d if I get a chance I review it and get the angles he used.

I think if it is end grain facing up an angle is needed if it is in a frame because the expansion will be on the width.

Yep. exactly like your picture shows.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

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dgray

2 posts in 2566 days


#4 posted 11-25-2009 07:14 PM

I am pretty sure that this is the way they used to be made, So I’m going to give it a go. Thanks for the comments. I like the idea that anything I design has to last 50 + years of abuse!

BlankMan,
Thanks for your comments. I’d really appreciate it if you could shed any light on the draft angle, and contact areas.

ps. sorry for massive image.
Cheers

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BlankMan

1488 posts in 2814 days


#5 posted 11-26-2009 05:22 AM

Here’s a quick crude drawing of the angles and cuts Norm used, they are not to scale though so it does not represent how far down he cut the 5, 10, & 30 degree angles.

-- -Curt, Milwaukee, WI

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