LumberJocks

P1IU-A9 for inflating tires and perhaps minor use of impact wrench

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by primuspaul posted 09-23-2015 02:37 AM 1170 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View primuspaul's profile

primuspaul

11 posts in 514 days


09-23-2015 02:37 AM

If I can get a P1IU-A9 for $250, is it good for the tasks I listed above? Would you recommend expanding the reservoir by connecting a 10-30 gal air tank between the compressor and power tool/tire inflator?


17 replies so far

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2708 days


#1 posted 09-23-2015 04:56 PM

I don’t know what P1IU-A9 is. You should specify the make, capacity, pressure, hp, etc for an answer. For an inpact wrench, you should have a compressor capable of delivering at least 4 CFM (cubic feet per minute).

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#2 posted 09-23-2015 05:35 PM


http://www.amazon.com/Ingersoll-P1IU-A9-Carry-Twinstack-Compressor/dp/B0035HYJN4

Nice job site compressor particularly suited to nail guns. Should work fine for inflating tires and occasional very light duty impact wrench use. And while you can add another tank, by that point you might as well just get a compressor that already has a larger tank – unless the ‘portable’ aspect is really required and couldn’t be accomplished with one on wheels. I see really nice used units (20 gallon tanks or larger on wheels) on CL all the time for much less than what you are looking at spending.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: With those small tanks, it’s a good thing that it’s rated at 100% duty cycle :)

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7482 posts in 1472 days


#3 posted 09-23-2015 07:48 PM

Inflating tires, yes.
CHANGING tires? No, I doubt it. With that small of capacity, you might break ONE lugnut loose then have to wait 5 or 10 minutes to break the next one loose.

And as to hooking a bigger tank to it, you’ll probably wear it out pretty fast, because it will NEVER shut off. As Mr Unix said above, if you dont want to spend much more for a bigger unit, check Craigslist and find a used one.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1186 days


#4 posted 09-24-2015 02:09 AM

You would likely extend the compressor beyond its duty cycle adding a surge tank five times larger than its factory capacity. Occasional use on easily broken loose lug nuts shouldn’t be a problem. Here in the rust belt where your tax dollars go to 2” deep salt on the road all winter play havoc on nearly anything made of metal, including the bond between lug nuts and steel as well as aluminum wheels. Ingersoll Rand has been in the business for a long time and most of what they produce is high quality. Before settling on a portable compressor, is that what you want because it’s small and portable or because it’s less expensive than a larger compressor (which sounds like it might serve you better based on what you would like to use it for). A small footprint can be achieved with a ~25 gallon vertical tank, 120V, belt drive compressor. Another benefit would be greater CFM and much quieter.

View primuspaul's profile

primuspaul

11 posts in 514 days


#5 posted 09-24-2015 02:21 AM



You would likely extend the compressor beyond its duty cycle adding a surge tank five times larger than its factory capacity. Occasional use on easily broken loose lug nuts shouldn t be a problem. Here in the rust belt where your tax dollars go to 2” deep salt on the road all winter play havoc on nearly anything made of metal, including the bond between lug nuts and steel as well as aluminum wheels. Ingersoll Rand has been in the business for a long time and most of what they produce is high quality. Before settling on a portable compressor, is that what you want because it s small and portable or because it s less expensive than a larger compressor (which sounds like it might serve you better based on what you would like to use it for). A small footprint can be achieved with a ~25 gallon vertical tank, 120V, belt drive compressor. Another benefit would be greater CFM and much quieter.

- bigblockyeti


I picked it for the low cost. I figured, given a specific price, I’d rather spend the money on a motor instead of a motor and tank. I can always just hook up a tank to enhance that part of the compressor. Can you give me a recommendation?

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1186 days


#6 posted 09-24-2015 02:46 AM

http://www.lowes.com/pd_268707-1126-VT6389_0__?productId=3824207. This is what I would recommend, the cost is certainly higher, but I’ve seen them used and looking like new for <$200 several times. You get enough portability that one person can deal with it and from a performance standpoint, it does more of what you want while making less noise. Several manufacturers make their own version, but the key point is belt drive which allows the compressor pump to spin much slower.

View primuspaul's profile

primuspaul

11 posts in 514 days


#7 posted 09-24-2015 02:54 AM

How does this brand compare to IR?

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1186 days


#8 posted 09-24-2015 12:10 PM

Kobalt doesn’t make their own compressors, much like Husky (Home Depot’s house brand) doesn’t either, they rebrand what they specify from some other manufacturer. As far as how they compare, with the same format of compressor (small portable, high speed motor, oil lubed pump, etc.) I would say they would be fairly comparable. As far as overall fit and finish, life of the product & customer service, Ingersoll Rand has been in the business for quite a while as a result these aspects should be better. I cannot attest to their customer service as I have no experience with them outside of impact wrenches. The exact make isn’t as important as the tank size and belt drive compressor, many different brands exist (IR makes one like this too) and if they have good reviews it’s probably a safe bet that you shouldn’t have any problems.

View WoodNSawdust's profile

WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 641 days


#9 posted 09-24-2015 12:39 PM

Depending on how much you use it consider Harbor Freight. You could get the same item a lot cheaper or a more powerful unit for the same price. Harbor Freight is a lower quality unit but it is also lower price. Plus there is the always available 20% off coupon.

Don’t buy their rubber air hoses! I have one and every time I go to use it there is another crack in it.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6572 posts in 1615 days


#10 posted 09-24-2015 02:45 PM

For what it’s worth, 2 days ago I bought a 20 gallon 3hp horizontal compressor on Craigslist for $125. Works just fine, and has twice the CFM ratings as that IR does. There’s plenty of them out there as well. I looked for like 2 days before finding a couple that were worth contacting about.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View primuspaul's profile

primuspaul

11 posts in 514 days


#11 posted 09-24-2015 09:54 PM



Depending on how much you use it consider Harbor Freight. You could get the same item a lot cheaper or a more powerful unit for the same price. Harbor Freight is a lower quality unit but it is also lower price. Plus there is the always available 20% off coupon.

Don t buy their rubber air hoses! I have one and every time I go to use it there is another crack in it.

- WoodNSawdust

I read bad things about Central Pneumatic compressors (the ones at Harbor Freight). In addition to low quality and durability, they simply don’t live up to the posted ratings. In other words, they and IR are giving different numbers calculated in different ways. It looks like the unit would be $180 there (coupon not available for it I believe), but it looks like some people bought it for $125 and are still complaining. IR tends to get good reviews all around.

The Kobalt was a bit better reviews-wise, but still looks like the new units need mechanical work as if it’s used.

View primuspaul's profile

primuspaul

11 posts in 514 days


#12 posted 09-24-2015 09:55 PM

By the way, what is the belt drive benefit people are talking about? The IR unit does not have this benefit I assume, right? Can someone elaborate?

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1186 days


#13 posted 09-25-2015 02:30 AM

The benefit of the drive belt is allowing the pump to spin much slower, resulting in quieter operation (much quieter if driving an all cast iron pump), longer bearing life and vibration isolation between the pump and motor. The IR unit in question has a unitized, single cylinder pump/motor assembly in which neither can operate without the other as this method incorporates the drive side of the pump as the front of the motor. This results in a lighter, less expensive and more compact design. The downside is almost all such unitized designs run at 3450rpm which can make them quite noisy. A few are on the market that run at ~1725rpm which requires a piston of double the surface area to product the same air volume, but brings piston and valve speeds down to half cutting the noise substantially. Belt drive models employ a drive reduction system bringing a two cylinder pump down to a running speed of roughly 600-700rpm, coupled with the heavier design construction, this results even slower piston and valve speeds making the compressor pump that much quieter.

View primuspaul's profile

primuspaul

11 posts in 514 days


#14 posted 09-25-2015 11:27 PM



The benefit of the drive belt is allowing the pump to spin much slower, resulting in quieter operation (much quieter if driving an all cast iron pump), longer bearing life and vibration isolation between the pump and motor. The IR unit in question has a unitized, single cylinder pump/motor assembly in which neither can operate without the other as this method incorporates the drive side of the pump as the front of the motor. This results in a lighter, less expensive and more compact design. The downside is almost all such unitized designs run at 3450rpm which can make them quite noisy. A few are on the market that run at ~1725rpm which requires a piston of double the surface area to product the same air volume, but brings piston and valve speeds down to half cutting the noise substantially. Belt drive models employ a drive reduction system bringing a two cylinder pump down to a running speed of roughly 600-700rpm, coupled with the heavier design construction, this results even slower piston and valve speeds making the compressor pump that much quieter.

- bigblockyeti


Well the noise is not much of a concern for me, but how much longer would the pump last? The 700 RPM belt drive would arguably last 5 times as long as the 3450 RPM IR?

View primuspaul's profile

primuspaul

11 posts in 514 days


#15 posted 09-25-2015 11:33 PM

showing 1 through 15 of 17 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com