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Edge planing on a surface planer

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Forum topic by MrRon posted 09-22-2015 07:50 PM 806 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrRon

3926 posts in 2703 days


09-22-2015 07:50 PM

What is your take on planing edges of boards in a surface planer by standing the board on edge, supported by a jig. This would only be used on boards less than 6” wide (1×6, 2×6).


17 replies so far

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6565 posts in 1610 days


#1 posted 09-22-2015 07:51 PM

What’s the purpose of doing that?

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4852 posts in 2273 days


#2 posted 09-22-2015 07:57 PM

Yes, I do that routinely. Ever since I upgraded my planer to a helical cutterhead, I’ve found it mills the smoothest finish. Therefore I rip my boards slightly oversized, and remove mill marks with the boards on edge at the planer. I don’t use a jig, because I find it unnecessary, however I will gang boards together if I have several of the same width.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1769 days


#3 posted 09-22-2015 07:58 PM

If I follow you I do it all the time.

That how I size a lot of my work. Like face frames for cabinet.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4167 posts in 3202 days


#4 posted 09-22-2015 08:03 PM

no problems at all – even without a jig.

I would do this to size pieces to the same width, several at a time.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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Richard H

489 posts in 1140 days


#5 posted 09-22-2015 08:04 PM

I have done that for really thick pieces like 4X4’s and 4X6’s to good success but those pieces couldn’t be ripped in a tablesaw easily. The question is for smaller pieces is it faster/easier/safer than using a tablesaw to rip them to width? I’m not sure I would go below about 2” wide for stability sake and even than unless you have a very small tablesaw I would think you won’t gain to much.

AlaskaGuy does bring up a good point with narrow pieces like face frames it’s probably a lot more stable. I was think pieces more like 6-8” wide and if they could be keep stable only 3/4” thick though a planner.

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1769 days


#6 posted 09-22-2015 08:07 PM



I have done with for really thick pieces like 4X4 s and 4X6 s to good success but those pieces couldn t be ripped in a tablesaw easily. The question is for smaller pieces is it faster/easier/safer than using a tablesaw to rip them to width? I m not sure I would go below about 2” wide for stability sake and even than unless you have a very small tablesaw I would think you won t gain to much. For 1X stock I think it s probably more work securing the board upright safely than it s worth but that s me and if you need to do anything more than make the edge parallel to the other face you will be taking a lot of passes.

- Richard H

I do 1/2 and 3/4 stock all the time. No problem.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2703 days


#7 posted 09-23-2015 04:58 PM



What s the purpose of doing that?

- jmartel


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MrRon

3926 posts in 2703 days


#8 posted 09-23-2015 05:00 PM


What s the purpose of doing that?

- jmartel

- MrRon


For the same reasons given by the next five replies.

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Redman1

9 posts in 436 days


#9 posted 09-23-2015 05:05 PM

I have done so also. Stacking relatively narrow stock seems safer than one at a time. Be careful to get the stack flat on the platen otherwise one or more pieces may try to roll over if not flat on the platen.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3926 posts in 1953 days


#10 posted 09-23-2015 05:17 PM

I do it a lot as well, but never on any that tall and I usually gang up several and plane them together. If you’re trying to get a lot of face frame material to the same with it’s the cat arse.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6565 posts in 1610 days


#11 posted 09-23-2015 05:40 PM



For the same reasons given by the next five replies.

- MrRon

Just doesn’t strike me as something that’s worth doing. With a good setup on your tablesaw and a decent blade, you should be able to glue straight off the saw. If you want to clean it up, a quick pass on the jointer or with a hand plane will do it. And you can even put in a spring joint which is even better.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4852 posts in 2273 days


#12 posted 09-23-2015 05:52 PM

I say use the tool that gives you the best surface possible. For some that is the tablesaw. For me I like to us a 24 tooth ripping blade because it cuts quickly. However it doesn’t leave a polished finish by any means. Even before I got the helical head on my planer I found that the planer was my preferred method to clean up mill marks.

Now that I use the helical head, it makes the tablesaw cuts look like firewood and the jointer cuts look like craters on the moon. Really no mill marks to remove anymore, which is quite a treat.

I wouldn’t say I use edge planing so much for glueups, because those boards are usually wider. However for milling parts that need to be straight and clean such as door parts and face frames it’s a great technique.

Everyone has their own methods, and that’s what makes woodworking great.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

979 posts in 981 days


#13 posted 09-23-2015 06:25 PM

For boards that are too long for their thickness it’s easy to get an un-square edge, even with stacked pieces, but, if you’re careful and attentive, it’s a handy technique.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1769 days


#14 posted 09-23-2015 06:37 PM

For the same reasons given by the next five replies.

- MrRon

Just doesn t strike me as something that s worth doing. With a good setup on your tablesaw and a decent blade, you should be able to glue straight off the saw. If you want to clean it up, a quick pass on the jointer or with a hand plane will do it. And you can even put in a spring joint which is even better.

- jmartel

There’s an old saying ” don’t reject something you know nothing about or haven’t tried.

As I said in my other post I do this a lot for finial sizing face frame and other parts. It works very well and very easy as the you don’t have to hold anything against a fence. The pressure rollers on the planer do all the work.

This is how a lot of pro shop size parts. Even better yet for sizing stock is running through a stock feeder using a back fence. This is something you’ll find pro shop doing also.

This has nothing to do preparing an edge for glue ups.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Daruc's profile

Daruc

459 posts in 593 days


#15 posted 09-23-2015 06:53 PM

I’ll hand feed 3 or 4 pcs at a time or I can take 8 or 10 pcs and clamp them together (@ends) run them through my wide belt.
Never had a second thought about it.

(Glue ups come straight off the saw.)

-- -

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