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custom kitchen island pricing

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Forum topic by SwampBarn posted 09-22-2015 05:27 PM 745 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SwampBarn

2 posts in 466 days


09-22-2015 05:27 PM

Hey jocks I was hoping you could help me out with some pricing. I am about to make a custom kitchen island for a customer. It is going to be 5 feet long by 3 feet wide. Granite counter top, sliding door on the back side, shelving on the opposite side, wine bottle cabinet behind the sliding door. All he basically said is he wants it to be a WOW factor when people visit his home. We are going to go over colors and types of wood later this week. What would you guys charge the guy? Or a range of prices? Buying a kitchen island from menards can run anywhere from 800-1200 and that is just standard laminate countertops. This is completely custom for him and it will look very nice. So I need some help, what should I charge based on the size and custom aspect of the job?


6 replies so far

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2851 posts in 2693 days


#1 posted 09-22-2015 05:34 PM

Got any pics? HOUZZ has a lot of pics. Maybe you could find something similar.

What style?
Also, what material are you going to use? The dollars can add up in a hurry.

Edit: Why put in a sliding door to hide the wine rack? The goodies should be visible.

Depending on the style of wine rack you intend to put in it, the labor factor could be expensive.

A drawer or two would be really handy to store utensils and other stuff.

Price? I don’t have as clue because of the variables. Remember, it is custom and not something you buy at the store and put together with screws.

Good luck.
Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View Drew's profile

Drew

304 posts in 2562 days


#2 posted 09-22-2015 07:57 PM

Time and materials

Here is where I sound like a jerk, but it needs to be said….

If you can’t figure time and materials than maybe you should pass on the job

-- TruCraftFurniture.com

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1771 days


#3 posted 09-22-2015 08:13 PM

People who estimate work usually require plans and specs. Little things like what the finish is going to be can change the price a bunch.

That being said tell him $10,000 cause you want him to have the wow factor too.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2529 days


#4 posted 09-22-2015 08:30 PM


Hey jocks I was hoping you could help me out with some pricing. I am about to make a custom kitchen island for a customer. It is going to be 5 feet long by 3 feet wide. Granite counter top, sliding door on the back side, shelving on the opposite side, wine bottle cabinet behind the sliding door. All he basically said is he wants it to be a WOW factor when people visit his home. We are going to go over colors and types of wood later this week. What would you guys charge the guy? Or a range of prices? Buying a kitchen island from menards can run anywhere from 800-1200 and that is just standard laminate countertops. This is completely custom for him and it will look very nice. So I need some help, what should I charge based on the size and custom aspect of the job?

- SwampBarn

If you think you can get close to 1200$ for custom made that size you will make .50/hour and its not worth it.

have you desigend the piece yet? If you use sketchup and the cutlist addin you can figure bf and ply and parts such as drawer slides etc. Are there turned legs in your design? Once you figure BF/ply/hw costs add .30 fudge factor to cover those oops and forgot to figure that in.

You will need to design to hold weight of top. Price top as well. After all that’s done figure your time and how much you want to make and add in overhead i.e power gas costs etc. If you don’t know how to figure your time based on past experience, you could do what I did years ago. Took materials + overhead and doubled and that was labor.

Just some ideas good luck.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View huff's profile

huff

2828 posts in 2747 days


#5 posted 09-23-2015 01:14 PM

SwampBarn,

There should be a few questions you should ask before you can even begin to price a custom piece of furniture or cabinetry….........the first few questions, you need to ask to yourself.

1. What are my capabilities as a woodworker? Can I really build “WOW” ?
2. What are my design capabilities? Can I really design “WOW” ?
3. What are my resources for materials? Can I offer materials that has a “WOW” factor or do I just offer materials from one of the big box stores.
4. Can I offer a “WOW” finish.
5. What are my resources for Granite?
6. Have I made an appointment to go look at the clients kitchen where this island is suppose to go?

The next few questions you need to ask would be to your client.

1. Do they have a budget in mind for this project or is the sky the limit? If they give you a low ball figure like something they could buy from a big box store or Ikea, then it will be up to you to educate them on the difference of pricing from mass produced cabinetry and custom built.

2. Never give them a “ball park” estimate before you figure out what they really want.

3. Do they have any picture of different ideas they may like?

As far as pricing goes; I wrote a blog series here on LJ’s on “How to price your woodworking and sell it” that may be some help.

Good luck.

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

688 posts in 1260 days


#6 posted 09-24-2015 02:50 AM

How about this figure out the cost of materials double it .Then add 100 dollars for every 300 of the double material cost.That should get you close.

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