LumberJocks

Routing a profile on an irregular shaped work piece.

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by dbhost posted 11-23-2009 07:07 PM 1252 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5604 posts in 2693 days


11-23-2009 07:07 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

For our upcoming (before Christmas) Anniversary present this year, I wanted to make something special for LOML… I have decided on a heart shaped candle holder to hold the wedding candles from our wedding.

The material chosen is a piece of 3/4” pine, sourced from the building we had the reception in. (It suffered damage during Ike, and has been rebuilt since).

I have the heart shape cut out, and sanded, I am planning on adding pre made turned holders sized for the candles. they will be glued into the heart and act as uprights.

I would like to route a profile around the heart, but want to make sure that I don’t have any blow out.

I want to do a simple 3/8” roundover.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com


8 replies so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3962 posts in 2625 days


#1 posted 11-23-2009 07:38 PM

Do you have any scraps or discards of the wood? Try it on that, it may not be an issue…......

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3962 posts in 2625 days


#2 posted 11-23-2009 07:40 PM

Or nibble away with a 1/4”, then increase to 3/8”.................

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View EdWood's profile

EdWood

12 posts in 2775 days


#3 posted 11-23-2009 07:55 PM

I do this all the time on my router table with a round over bit with a guide bearing. I use a gripper pad and work the piece past the bit. The bearing keep everything under control and takes a fairly light pass.

-- Edwood - http://edwoodcrafting.blogspot.com/

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16241 posts in 3679 days


#4 posted 11-23-2009 08:00 PM

Like EdWood said, this is a pretty straightforward procedure.

Will you be doing it freehand or on a router table? Either way, you may want to do it in a couple of passes to minimize tearout. If you do it on a table, just make sure to keep rotating the workpiece so that you are always feeding it as close as possible to 90 degrees to the cutting edge.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5604 posts in 2693 days


#5 posted 11-23-2009 08:03 PM

On a router table. Specifically on the router insert of my BT… And yeah, I was planning on taking a couple of passes on it, No need to dive straight into the bit, yet.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3962 posts in 2625 days


#6 posted 11-23-2009 09:23 PM

As per Charlie, on the router table, I did this recently on some oak ply, which is very subject to tear out, and had no problem. A push block with a cut out, comes to mind, which is very irregular, and no tear out anywhere. Again, using a guide bearing on a round over bit. Unless there is something crazy about that piece of wood, hence the suggestion about trying on a piece of scrap.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5604 posts in 2693 days


#7 posted 11-23-2009 10:10 PM

No problem with the bearing guided round over. Have them to spare…

I get to get busy tonight I guess…

I have a few other projects that are in the “Finished, but not photographed” status that I am pending on posting about… You know how it is on LJs, no pics, didn’t happen…

But as a primer for that, keep your eyes peeled for posts RE: Band Saw Dust collection modifications, Kitty Condo, and on a non woodworking note, truck mods including DWV Intake mod, SCT tuner and refreshing the K&N filter… Hey, the truck is a tool too! Yes I did get HP gains, but that was not my primary goal, my primary goal with MPG gains…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3962 posts in 2625 days


#8 posted 11-23-2009 11:07 PM

Oh, and while I am thinking of it, like Ed noted, use a gripper pad, or if it is too small for that, consider drilling a hole in it and attaching a temporary handle. I bet one of those bench cookies would work well too.

Got to thinking about safety on the router table when I was making my push block, seemed my fingers were getting close to that bit, so I adjusted and used a gripper of some sort, don’t remember what. And then bought a router book to study up on the safety aspect.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com