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How are these legs cut?

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Forum topic by missesalot posted 09-21-2015 05:54 PM 1393 views 0 times favorited 33 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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missesalot

102 posts in 1062 days


09-21-2015 05:54 PM

Can someone explain to me how the legs on this are done? This pic is an extreme example, but figured the feature is obvious in this pic (is this called reverse taper?) how would these be cut? Could it be done with hand tools? Is there a particular style this is indicative of?


33 replies so far

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ChefHDAN

808 posts in 2313 days


#1 posted 09-21-2015 06:15 PM

no pic

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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CharlesA

3022 posts in 1261 days


#2 posted 09-21-2015 07:10 PM

Scroll saw and a dead blow mallet.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1772 days


#3 posted 09-21-2015 07:26 PM

No picture

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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JayT

4778 posts in 1674 days


#4 posted 09-21-2015 07:31 PM

I’d cut those with a super light “Airweight” hand saw—the kerf is so thin you can’t even see it. This looks like one of those projects that doing it with hand tools is just as fast as power tools and gives identical results. :-)

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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Ocelot

1470 posts in 2101 days


#5 posted 09-21-2015 07:33 PM

missesalot? Hmm nice name! :-)

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missesalot

102 posts in 1062 days


#6 posted 09-21-2015 07:35 PM

yup, i deserved all that:-) pic added

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Shadowrider

183 posts in 672 days


#7 posted 09-21-2015 07:43 PM

Large commercial planer with a sled of some sort?

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ShaneA

6472 posts in 2062 days


#8 posted 09-21-2015 07:47 PM

It could be done with a band saw for sure. There would be some cleanup, but that would be my first choice. I am sure you could get there with hand tools, and maybe a table saw too…depending on the thickness of the legs.

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CharlesA

3022 posts in 1261 days


#9 posted 09-21-2015 07:48 PM

You could adapt Chuck Bender's method tapered legs on a jointer. The other method would be on a bandsaw—you would need to tape on the cut off to make it square for at least one side. You’d have more clean up to do on the bandsaw.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

1917 posts in 1779 days


#10 posted 09-21-2015 07:54 PM

Same as putting a taper on a smaller leg, Taper the two insides and leave the outsides straight.
You can use a taper jig or draw a line and run it through the band saw and clean up on the jointer.
If you look at them they are the same legs you’ve made hundreds of times and installed up side down.

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

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Daruc

459 posts in 596 days


#11 posted 09-21-2015 08:03 PM

Cut 4 pcs, taper them, then bevel the 2 sides and glue together like a box.

-- -

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bearkatwood

1202 posts in 475 days


#12 posted 09-21-2015 08:19 PM

Woodust has a good way if you are to laminate them, if you are using solid lumber mill up a square board and then make your tenon on the top smaller than the taper will go to. It is then just a simple four sided taper using a taper jig on a table saw and cauls to hold the work after the first sections have been cut away. This table has no skirt like a usual table, but has a picture style frame around it so the legs tenon would attach there. You can have a solid top and have the tenon come through the top for visible joinery work if you like. The style has an oriental feel to it. Here is a table we did with similar joinery, but a bit different leg and top with no frame.

-- Brian Noel

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JayT

4778 posts in 1674 days


#13 posted 09-21-2015 08:35 PM

I agree with GrumpyMike about just the insides being tapered and with bearkat about doing the tenons before tapering. Many ways to taper legs that have been mentioned—table saw, band saw, jointer. I tapered the legs on my last project with a hand plane. Pick the method you feel most comfortable with.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4854 posts in 2277 days


#14 posted 09-21-2015 10:00 PM

1+ Woodust if hollow legs. Like that but with a locking miter bit at the router table.

If solid legs, then it depends on the capacity of your machinery. My first choice would be a taper sled at the tablesaw (save your offcuts!). With a 10” blade you are limited to 3” depth of cut.

Second choice would be bandsaw sled, then clean up the rough cuts with a light pass on the jointer.

I have seen jointer techniques to taper legs, but personally they give me the chills.

If you taper only the outside two edges, you will still have a vertical leg surface to make typical joinery such as horizontal rails.

Good luck with it. Stay safe.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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cabmaker

1507 posts in 2272 days


#15 posted 09-22-2015 02:26 AM

Jointer would be my first choice. Very quick and efficient

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