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Forum topic by bnisimov posted 09-21-2015 01:39 AM 1097 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bnisimov

12 posts in 447 days


09-21-2015 01:39 AM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw

Hi to all!

Im new to woodowrking. I have few power tools already. I used circular saw to cut my lumber to sizes i need and use various hand/power tools for tenons and mortises and other needs where you would use a table saw.

I think Im ready to get a table saw and take my work to next level both in quality and speed.

I was wondering if you can suggest a table saw for a hobbyist? I came across tow saws dewalt DWE7480 for 379 and bosch Model #: 4100-09 for 599.

let me know if you have any recommendations.

Thanks!


17 replies so far

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2699 days


#1 posted 09-21-2015 01:56 AM

If you search this forum, you will get a lot of info. Your question gets asked all the time.
Good luck.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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Ruffian998

6 posts in 622 days


#2 posted 09-21-2015 02:16 AM

For that price, if you have the room in your shop, I’d look at the Delta 36-725 sold at Lowes. I love mine and I can move it around my garage very easily.

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

877 posts in 1752 days


#3 posted 09-21-2015 12:19 PM

+1 for the Delta 36-725

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

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toolie

2025 posts in 2096 days


#4 posted 09-21-2015 01:47 PM

I’d checkout the choosing a table saw stickies @woodworkingtalk.com. Very informative for the newbie.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2535 days


#5 posted 09-21-2015 01:51 PM

Well, welcome! I’d say you could provide a bit more information it would be helpful

1) your budget $$
2) What do you want to make?
3) Can you do 220V or just 110?
4) have you had any experience with tablesaws?

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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bnisimov

12 posts in 447 days


#6 posted 09-21-2015 03:03 PM

Hi

Thank you for replies. I will look at forum and table saw stickies. It’s just I found outdated responses so far.

In terms of the following.
Budget abt 600
Plan on making tables chairs some book cases. Shoe racks.
Only 110
Used only circular saw so far

And I have very limited space .

I actually also looked at dewalt dwe7490x. Looks very nice.

Thanks

View jacquesr's profile

jacquesr

339 posts in 891 days


#7 posted 09-21-2015 03:07 PM

Delta 36-725. Way better than portable saws.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2699 days


#8 posted 09-21-2015 04:12 PM

There is a big difference in the size of table saws.

DeWalt DWE7480 sitting on top of Grizzly 1023

The DeWalt has a short arbor. Stacked dado not suggested by manufacturer.

It weighs less than 50# and can store on a wide shelf, or fold up and store against a wall if you mount it on a stand.

With the small table surface, some additional support for infeed/outfeed would make for a safer cutting experience.

Note: I bought the DeWalt specifically to take to the house where I am remodeling a kitchen. I will be cutting trim and other small stuff. For anything large, I use a track saw.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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rwe2156

2200 posts in 949 days


#9 posted 09-21-2015 11:41 PM

Doing your own due diligence rather than asking this question is a much better way to go.
My only advice is with your budget you should be able to find a good quality contractor saw.
I would hit Craigslist and look for the good brands like Delta Rockwell, Jet or Powermatic.

Stay away from the benchtop or jobsite type saws they are woefully underpowered.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View crank49's profile

crank49

3981 posts in 2439 days


#10 posted 09-22-2015 03:00 AM

All jobsite saws are not underpowered or crappy.
The Bosch you pointed out is a very nice saw with a good reputation.
You can be just as disapointed by a poor quality hybrid or contractor saw as a poor quality portable or job site saw.

Bottom line, don’t look for the least expensive example of any class of saw. You will only find inferior equipment there.

Having said that, there is a huge difference in portable saws with universal motors and plastic and aluminum frames and tables and their cabinet saw opposites with cast iron frames and tables and heavy arbors belt driven from induction motors. Two totally different worlds really. And at least $1000 difference in price.

The hybrids try to hit the ground some where in between those two extremes. Be very careful here.
Some companies, like Ridgid for instance, have tried to built saws that look like cabinet saws and have belt drive and induction motor and a cast iron top, and sell for the $500 to $600 price point. To accomplish this trick they cheapened the structure and built in China with poor quality control. A case where you would be better off with a good top end portable like the Bosch than the low ball hybrid el cheapo Ridgid. It appears to me that the
“Delta 36-725” at about $100 more than the Ridgid might have succeded in finding the sweet balance of decent quality at a reasonable price. Grizzly makes some good equipment for a few dollars more also.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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bnisimov

12 posts in 447 days


#11 posted 09-24-2015 01:59 AM

Thank you for your responses. Im actually now looking into Delta 36-775.

View jonah's profile

jonah

687 posts in 2767 days


#12 posted 09-24-2015 02:31 AM

The Delta 36-725 is pretty similar to the Ridgid R4512 – assuming you get a 4512 without the alignment issues (accounts differ as to whether the problems have been definitively solved yet).

Similar setup, similar table, similar motor, similar dust collection, similar fence. There’s not much to separate the the two, really.

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

1988 posts in 1313 days


#13 posted 09-24-2015 03:04 AM



The Delta 36-725 is pretty similar to the Ridgid R4512 – assuming you get a 4512 without the alignment issues (accounts differ as to whether the problems have been definitively solved yet).

Similar setup, similar table, similar motor, similar dust collection, similar fence. There s not much to separate the the two, really.

- jonah

I have to disagree, as a former R4512 owner I can say the fence, rails, and dust collection are not the same.

The R4512 has crappy 2 piece rounded rails and the fence would often move a little when you locked it in position, the dust port was on the very bottom and was quite good, the 36-725 looks like it has dust collection out the back and moves when the blade is tilted. it looks like a single piece rectangular tube. Even if it is 2 pieces, clamping them to a reference would be much easier than strange oval shaped tubes.

I don’t believe the motor was bad at all, mine could pass the nickle test easily. The alignment issue and the rails were the problem with the R4512. I ended donating mine to Habitat for Humanity.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 954 days


#14 posted 09-24-2015 03:29 AM

Just me. Delta all the way.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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knotscott

7226 posts in 2843 days


#15 posted 09-24-2015 10:23 AM


Thank you for your responses. Im actually now looking into Delta 36-775.

- bnisimov

I think you’re smart to consider a full size saw like the Delta, which I happen to think is the best of the new entry level fulls size saws due to a clean track record and a very good steel Delta T fence. The actual area they take up isn’t really much more than a portable, and you gain a bunch of advantages. You do lose the ability to store it on a shelf, but you can device a custom fit plywood top so that it at least doubles as a work table. Sometimes, going the portable route is unavoidable, but if you can make it work the stationary saws offer a lot of great features, function, and growth. The ABCs of Table Saws

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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