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Forum topic by maeks84 posted 1607 days ago 1241 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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maeks84

21 posts in 1611 days


1607 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: joinery

Hi all,
I have a few questions that I hope I can get some advice on. I have three questions, but first some background. The picture below is what I’m working towards. This is only a portion, there are two more (simpler) parts to come. I haven’t completed the planning, so I won’t post the SketchUp file unless asked for it. My biggest hurdle is figuring out how to join the pieces together. I don’t yet have the experience to know all the possibilities. I’m trying to avoid having screws show and I don’t really want to plug any holes. I’m planning on using mostly 3/4” thick wood. Plywood and cedar.
Desk 1

1) How to attach the top to the side panels?
My thought was to use a 1”x1” piece of cedar underneath the top. Attached via screws going in from both directions. (The cylinders are supposed to be screws in the picture.) I don’t really like it since it seems like the final screws might be hard to get into the right place, being so close to the side panels. It seems like there might be a better method, so I’m wondering what you guys think?
Top Joinery

2) How to attach the front lip?
I was thinking metal. A piece of angle iron cut up with a couple holes drilled into it. Again though, if there was another option…

I did think of biscuits, but I don’t have a biscuit jointer yet. The cost of the plywood for this was enough for me and I’d rather minimize any other purchases for a while. Though maybe I could borrow one. Would putting biscuits into the side of plywood be a problem? Breaking out of the layers or something?

Front Lip

3) Is this method good enough for the side panels?
I saw this method somewhere online and thought it might work. The center portion is 1/4” plywood that is set into a 1/4” groove. The outside frame is held together with this same groove. There were no screws in this part, it was just held together with glue. My main question here is if just the groove and glue are good enough to hold it all together? Should I put a few dowels into it in addition? I hope to do most the sides this way if it seems alright.
Panel

I know this probably isn’t described real well, so please bear with me. I’ll of course try to provide any more details that might help clarify something.

Thanks,
Matthew

-- http://maeks84.wordpress.com


6 replies so far

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

3253 posts in 1694 days


#1 posted 1607 days ago

Greetings, Matthew: I try to help a little. First, you didn’t mention what power tools you have, so i’m assuming you have them. You mentioned ply and cedar. From your drawing you’re making a desk with storage shelfs behind the door? Two pull-out drawers? Will it be just setting next tothe file cabinet? If so, then we’ll start.
(1) You can attach the top in one of several ways. With figure”8’s”, and no glue, or like you said, screwing and glueing cleats underneath, or cutting rabbets on the sides and setting the top in them, if the top is going to be flush with the sides. Don’t glue the top down, cause it could cause some problems down the road.
(2) You can attach the front lip by either just glueing it on flush, bisquits, or nails filled with putty. Just glueing will work fine.
(3) The sides are rail and stiles. If they are 3/4”, cut a 1/4” groove in the rails and stiles and center stile. Not a 3/4” groove. This is best done on the table saw with a 1/4 ” dado blade, or two passes with a 1/8” saw blade.
You’ll have to make 1/4” tenons on each of the stiles to fit the groove. Stub tenons will work(about 3/4-1” long). Cut the 1/4” ply panels to fit, glue it up, and good to go.
There will be others come on and give you better advice. More experienced cabitnetmakers. They know how to do it.

From your drawing, looks like dados and rabbets will work for the joinery. Hope this helps a little.

-- " I started with nothing, and I've still got most of it left".......

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

3253 posts in 1694 days


#2 posted 1607 days ago

One other thing. I told you not to glue the top down. I meant if you used the figure 8’s. If you use the rabbet joinery, you will cut a 3/8’s x 3/4” rabbet, set the top down in it, and glue it down. Sorry.

-- " I started with nothing, and I've still got most of it left".......

View GFYS's profile

GFYS

711 posts in 1971 days


#3 posted 1607 days ago

The panels are best done with a t&g cabinet set on a router rather than some silly jig on a tablesaw.
I think the t&g is more like 3/8 on the one I use.

View jlsmith5963's profile

jlsmith5963

297 posts in 1848 days


#4 posted 1607 days ago

“some silly jig on a table saw”
mics_54 what do you against a table saw jigs, what did they ever do to you?... lol

-- criticism: the art of analyzing and evaluating the quality of an artistic work...

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maeks84

21 posts in 1611 days


#5 posted 1607 days ago

1/4” groove. Yes, that’s what I meant. Editing original post to correct that. The power tools available are a table saw, radial arm saw, router, planer, bandsaw, and a small jointer. I had a heck of a time get the jointer to work right, but it’s doing pretty good now. Haven’t messed with the bandsaw much yet. They were both purchased at an auction. I don’t have too many bits for the router, but will purchase them as needed.

Behind the door will be a safe, so it’s pretty much open behind it. Here is a pic without the filing cabinet, door, and drawers.
Part 1 minimal

This below is a picture of the entire project. It’s pretty much in three pieces and I haven’t yet completed the model. The middle part would be where the computer and chair would go.
Full Project Incomplete

On question 2, part of the worry was due to what can be seen in the photo above. In the middle portion is where the chair would be and where I was mostly worried about it breaking off. Knees hitting it or something. With it being just glued to the edge of plywood, I didn’t know how strong it would be and how much abuse it could/would take? I probably should have posted that picture earlier or explained the concern better.

On the router suggestion. I hadn’t thought of it and I like it. I don’t really like our table saw since the fence is a pain to adjust. Each time it needs moved, it stops being square to the blade and I can’t find any adjustments for that portion. It is better than our old one though, since the table is bigger and the fence locks down on both ends. The router just sounds easier to me.

-- http://maeks84.wordpress.com

View GFYS's profile

GFYS

711 posts in 1971 days


#6 posted 1607 days ago

jlsmith5963 :) I knew some one would like that! I have nothing against jigs really, it’s just much easier to make the panels with a cab set.

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